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    Login to your Fifth Third Member Banking account to manage finances online. Visit this page to access your accounts with Fifth Third Bank. Browse photos and price history of this 5 bed, 11 bath, 6003 Sq. Ft. recently sold home at 53 Boulder Rdg, Breckenridge, CO 80424 that sold on October 12. First Third Bank is one of America's most trusted financial service provider. This article will show you how to access the login portal.

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    The Eagles made a flurry of roster moves Saturday afternoon in advance of their wild-card playoff game against the Bucs in Tampa on Sunday.

    With Tyree Jackson on Injured Reserve with a torn ACL, veteran tight end Richard Rodgers was signed from the practice squad to the 53-man roster. Rodgers, 29, has spent parts of the last four seasons with the Eagles. He has 147 career receptions for 1,529 yards and 15 touchdowns, including 24-for-345 last year. Rodgers is the Eagles’ most experienced playoff player with 10 career games. He has 13 catches for 138 yards and two TDs in the postseason, all with the Packers. Rodgers has played in three games this year and has two catches for 11 yards.

    The Eagles placed rookie sixth-round defensive tackle Marlon Tuipulotu on the Reserve/COVID-19 list. Tuipuilotu played in five games this year and had five tackles. He played 55 defensive snaps, 26 of them in the meaningless loss to the Cowboys last weekend.

    With Tuipulotu’s roster spot, the Eagles activated undrafted rookie offensive lineman Kayode Awosika from the practice squad. Awoskia, Jackson’s college teammate at Buffalo, made his NFL debut in the Dallas game Sunday and played 43 snaps.

    The Eagles elevated defensive end Cameron Malveaux as a game-day practice squad elevation. Malveaux has played 66 snaps in the last three games. With Josh Sweat’s status up in the air -- he didn’t practice all week because of abdominal pain -- Malveaux becomes the fourth active edge rusher after Derek Barnett, Ryan Kerrigan and Tarron Jackson. Malveaux has previously played with the Browns, Cards, Dolphins, 49ers, Chiefs and Washington.

    The Eagles also elevated wide receiver KeeSean Johnson from the practice squad. Johnson, a former sixth-round pick of the Cards, caught 36 passes for 360 yards and one TD in 18 games for the Cards in 2019 and 2020. Johnson has been on the Eagles’ practice squad all year.

    Источник: https://www.nbcsports.com/philadelphia/eagles/eagles-vs-bucs-richard-rodgers-signed-53-three-others-added-roster

    FIFTH THIRD BANCORP

    Fifth Third Bank today announced changes to its retirement planning site - Retire.53.com - designed to enhance the overall experience of its visitors - those individuals who are participating in a 401K plan managed by Fifth Third Bank.

    Fifth Third updated the website in response to feedback it collected through surveys, focus groups and other interactions with its 401K clients. The redesigned website will provide a more personalized experience offering Fifth Third Bank clients the tools and information they need to help them take control of their retirement.

    "These enhancements are part of our ongoing effort to improve the experience of our 401K participants," said Melissa Hooker, senior vice president and director of Fifth Third Bank's retirement business. "This is much more than a cosmetic redesign. It's a comprehensive renovation that will help empower our clients to prepare for their better tomorrows."

    The new site, which is scheduled to be available in early October, offers the following enhancements:

    • A cleaner, more user-friendly design which makes navigation simpler and access to information easier to find.
    • A projected retirement income tool which allows participants to see exactly how they are progressing toward their retirement savings goal.
    • Planning ideas to help clients close potential gaps between what they need at retirement and their current savings rate.
    • Additional calculators, planning tools and robust investment information to aid site plan participants to make more informed decisions.

    Fifth Third Bancorp is a diversified financial services company headquartered in Cincinnati, Ohio. The Company has $111 billion in assets and operates 15 affiliates with 1,314 full-service Banking Centers, including 103 Bank Mart® locations open seven days a week inside select grocery stores and 2,434 ATMs in Ohio, Kentucky, Indiana, Michigan, Illinois, Florida, Tennessee, West Virginia, Pennsylvania, Missouri, Georgia and North Carolina. Fifth Third operates four main businesses: Commercial Banking, Branch Banking, Consumer Lending, and Investment Advisors. Fifth Third also has a 49% interest in Vantiv, LLC, formerly Fifth Third Processing Solutions, LLC. Fifth Third is among the largest money managers in the Midwest and, as of June 30, 2011, had $276 billion in assets under care, of which it managed $25 billion for individuals, corporations and not-for-profit organizations. Investor information and press releases can be viewed at www.53.com. Fifth Third's common stock is traded on the NASDAQ® Global Select Market under the symbol "FITB."

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    Источник: https://www.marketscreener.com/quote/stock/FIFTH-THIRD-BANCORP-9308/news/5TH-3RD-BANCO-New-Changes-Ahead-for-Retire-53-com-13792390/

    Investment company Yacktman Focused Fund (Current Portfolio) buys Reliance Steel & Aluminum Co, Samsung C&T Corp, Hyundai Motor Co, Yuasa Trading Co, Hyundai Motor Co, sells Brenntag SE, The Walt Disney Co, Macy's Inc, First Hawaiian Inc during the 3-months ended 2021Q4, according to the most recent filings of the investment company, Yacktman Focused Fund. As of 2021Q4, Yacktman Focused Fund owns 53 stocks with a total value of $3.8 billion. These are the details of the buys and sells.

    • New Purchases: RS, 028260,

    • Added Positions: 005935, ABF, 005385, 8074, 005387, CNQ, 057050,

    • Reduced Positions: BNR, DIS, SYY, M, GOOG, FHB, HUN, WFRD,


    For the details of Yacktman Focused Fund's stock buys and sells,
    go to https://www.gurufocus.com/guru/yacktman+focused+fund/current-portfolio/portfolioThese are the top 5 holdings of Yacktman Focused Fund

    1. Samsung Electronics Co Ltd (005935) - 7,250,000 shares, 11.38% of the total portfolio. Shares added by 9.02%

    2. Bollore SA (BOL) - 51,746,528 shares, 7.60% of the total portfolio.

    3. PepsiCo Inc (PEP) - 1,270,000 shares, 5.79% of the total portfolio.

    4. Microsoft Corp (MSFT) - 650,000 shares, 5.74% of the total portfolio.

    5. Canadian Natural Resources Ltd (CNQ) - 4,550,000 shares, 5.05% of the total portfolio. Shares added by 3.41%

    New Purchase: Reliance Steel & Aluminum Co (RS)

    Yacktman Focused Fund initiated holding in Reliance Steel & Aluminum Co. The purchase prices were between $141.18 and $166.83, with an estimated average price of $154.94. The stock is now traded at around $166.330000. The impact to a portfolio due to this purchase was 1.32%. The holding were 310,000 shares as of 2021-12-31. New Purchase: Samsung C&T Corp (028260)

    Yacktman Focused Fund initiated holding in Samsung C&T Corp. The purchase prices were between $105500 and $122500, with an estimated average price of $116484. The stock is now traded at around $115000.000000. The impact to a portfolio due to this purchase was 0.96%. The holding were 364,913 shares as of 2021-12-31. Added: Yuasa Trading Co Ltd (8074)
    Yacktman Focused Fund added to a holding in Yuasa Trading Co Ltd by 81.62%. The purchase prices were between $2797 and $3135, with an estimated average price of $2956.56. The stock is now traded at around $2964.000000. The impact to a portfolio due to this purchase was 0.22%. The holding were 708,500 shares as of 2021-12-31. Added: Hyundai Motor Co (005385)
    Yacktman Focused Fund added to a holding in Hyundai Motor Co by 25.00%. The purchase prices were between $90800 and $103000, with an estimated average price of $97971. The stock is now traded at around $100500.000000. The impact to a portfolio due to this purchase was 0.22%. The holding were 500,000 shares as of 2021-12-31. Added: Hyundai Motor Co (005387)
    Yacktman Focused Fund added to a holding in Hyundai Motor Co by 42.86%. The purchase prices were between $91500 and $105000, with an estimated average price of $99535.5. The stock is now traded at around $103500.000000. The impact to a portfolio due to this purchase was 0.2%. The holding were 300,000 shares as of 2021-12-31. Reduced: Brenntag SE (BNR)
    Yacktman Focused Fund reduced to a holding in Brenntag SE by 21.21%. The sale prices were between $75.02 and $84.8, with an estimated average price of $79.58. The stock is now traded at around $77.780000. The impact to a portfolio due to this sale was -0.92%. Yacktman Focused Fund still held 1,300,000 shares as of 2021-12-31. Reduced: The Walt Disney Co (DIS)
    Yacktman Focused Fund reduced to a holding in The Walt Disney Co by 25%. The sale prices were between $142.15 and $177.71, with an estimated average price of $161. The stock is now traded at around $151.940000. The impact to a portfolio due to this sale was -0.48%. Yacktman Focused Fund still held 300,000 shares as of 2021-12-31. Reduced: Macy's Inc (M)
    Yacktman Focused Fund reduced to a holding in Macy's Inc by 57.14%. The sale prices were between $22.21 and $37.37, with an estimated average price of $27.38. The stock is now traded at around $26.050000. The impact to a portfolio due to this sale was -0.38%. Yacktman Focused Fund still held 450,000 shares as of 2021-12-31. Reduced: First Hawaiian Inc (FHB)
    Yacktman Focused Fund reduced to a holding in First Hawaiian Inc by 42.53%. The sale prices were between $25.76 and $29.64, with an estimated average price of $27.87. The stock is now traded at around $30.950000. The impact to a portfolio due to this sale was -0.25%. Yacktman Focused Fund still held 400,000 shares as of 2021-12-31.

    Here is the complete portfolio of Yacktman Focused Fund. Also check out:

    1. Yacktman Focused Fund's Undervalued Stocks

    2. Yacktman Focused Fund's Top Growth Companies, and

    3. Yacktman Focused Fund's High Yield stocks

    4. Stocks that Yacktman Focused Fund keeps buyingThis article first appeared on GuruFocus.

    Источник: https://www.yahoo.com/now/yacktman-focused-fund-buys-reliance-193801109.html

    The Uyghur Forced Labor Prevention Act Goes Into Effect in the United States

    January 14, 2022

    Click for PDF

    On December 23, 2021, President Biden signed the Uyghur Forced Labor Prevention Act (the “UFLPA” or “Act”) into law.[1] The UFLPA, which received widespread bipartisan support in Congress, is the latest in a line of U.S. efforts to address the plight of Uyghurs and other persecuted minority groups in China’s Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region (the “XUAR”).

    A key feature of the Act is the creation of a rebuttable presumption that all goods manufactured even partially in the XUAR are the product of forced labor and therefore not entitled to entry at U.S. ports. The Act also builds on prior legislation, such as 2020’s Uyghur Human Rights Policy Act,[2] by expanding that Act’s authorization of sanctions to cover foreign individuals responsible for human rights abuses related to forced labor.

    I. Background

    In recent years, both the executive and legislative branches have demonstrated an increased interest in “lead[ing] the international community in ending forced labor practices wherever such practices occur,”[3] with a particular focus on the XUAR.

    2020 saw a boom in efforts across agencies and the houses of Congress, beginning with the Department of Homeland Security’s January publication of a Department-wide strategy to combat forced labor in supply chains.[4] Later that year, DHS joined the U.S. Departments of State, Treasury and Commerce to issue a joint advisory warning of heightened risks of forced labor for businesses with supply chain exposure to the XUAR.[5]

    The U.S. also emphasized eliminating forced labor in supply chains through its international obligations at this time. The 2020 United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement (“USMCA”) required each party to this free trade agreement to “prohibit the importation of goods into its territory from other sources produced in whole or in part by forced or compulsory labor.”[6] To carry out this obligation, President Trump issued an executive order in May 2020 establishing the Forced Labor Enforcement Task Force (“FLETF”), chaired by the Secretary of Homeland Security and including representatives from the Departments of State, Treasury, Justice, Labor, and the Office of the U.S. Trade Representative.[7] The implementing bill of the USMCA requires the FLETF to serve as the central hub for the U.S. government’s enforcement of the prohibition on imports made through forced labor.[8]

    In Congress, Rep. James McGovern (D) and Sen. Marco Rubio (R) — co-chairs of the Congressional-Executive Commission on China — introduced the first versions of the UFLPA in the House of Representatives[9] and the Senate[10] in March 2020. The bill received unusual, wide bipartisan support, with co-sponsors among Congress’s most conservative and most liberal members.[11] Each bill passed in its respective house in early 2021, and a compromise bill — reconciling differences of timing and reporting processes between the two versions — was sent to the President in mid-December[12] before being signed into law.

    II. Presumptive Ban on Imports from the XUAR

    The UFLPA’s trade provisions are notable both for their expansive scope and the heightened evidentiary standard required to rebut the Act’s presumptive prohibition on all imports from the XUAR.

    a. Scope of the Import Ban

    The UFLPA’s scope is broad, instructing U.S. Customs and Border Protection (“CBP”) to presume that “any goods, wares, articles, and merchandise mined, produced, or manufactured wholly or in part in” the XUAR were made with forced labor and are therefore unfit for entry at any U.S. ports.[13]

    This presumption extends also to goods, wares, articles, and merchandise produced by a variety of entities identified by the FLETF in its strategy to implement the Act. This includes entities that work with the XUAR government to recruit, transport, or receive forced labor from the XUAR,[14] as well as entities that participate in “poverty alleviation” and “pairing-assistance” programs[15] in the XUAR.[16]

    CBP has traditionally had the authority to prevent the importation of “[a]ll goods, wares, articles, and merchandise mined, produced, or manufactured wholly or in part in any foreign country by . . . forced labor” through the issuance of Withhold Release Orders (“WROs”).[17] The UFLPA broadens this power by creating a rebuttable presumption that all articles produced in whole or in part in the XUAR or by entities that source material from persons involved in XUAR government forced labor schemes are automatically barred from entry into the United States, even absent a WRO or any specific showing of forced labor in the supply chain.

    b. Exceptions to the Import Ban

    Despite this broad prohibition, importers of goods covered by the UFLPA may still be able to rebut the presumption against importation. The Act specifies that the presumption will not be applied if the Commissioner of CBP determines that:

    1. The importer of record has:
      • Fully complied with all due diligence and evidentiary guidance established by the FLETF pursuant to the Act, along with any associated implementing regulations; and
      • Completely and substantively responded to all CBP inquiries seeking to ascertain whether the goods were produced with forced labor; and
    2. “Clear and convincing” evidence shows that the goods were not produced wholly or in part with forced labor.[18]

    Each time the Commissioner determines that an exception to the import ban is warranted under the criteria above, the Commissioner must submit a report to Congress within 30 days, identifying the goods subject to the exception and the evidence upon which the determination is based.[19] The Commissioner must make all such reports available to the public.[20]

    III. High-Priority Enforcement Sectors

    As part of its enforcement strategy, the UFLPA instructs the Forced Labor Enforcement Task Force to prepare both a list of high-priority sectors subject to CBP enforcement, and a sector-specific enforcement plan for each of these high-priority sectors.[21] The Act mandates that cotton, tomatoes, and polysilicon must be among the high-priority sectors, building upon CBP’s existing WRO against all cotton and tomato products produced in the XUAR.[22]

    The addition of polysilicon on this list of high-priority sectors directly impacts the U.S. solar energy industry: nearly half of the world’s polysilicon — a key material for the manufacture of solar panels — is produced in the XUAR.[23] Despite the dominance of Chinese polysilicon, however, solar industry groups have embraced the passage of the UFLPA and are encouraging solar companies to move their supply chains out of the XUAR.[24] Corporate responsibility concerns surrounding the sourcing of polysilicon from the XUAR have been circulating for at least a year, and the solar industry groups have acted proactively to create standards and procedures to trace and audit supply chains of this important resource. To further this industry-wide goal of eradicating forced labor from solar supply chains,[25] these industry groups recently published a “Solar Supply Chain Traceability Protocol.”[26]

    IV. Sanctions

    The UFLPA also amends the Uyghur Human Rights Policy Act of 2020 to underscore that sanctions may be imposed due to “[s]erious human rights abuses in connection with forced labor” related to the XUAR. Within 180 days of enactment, the President is required to submit an initial report to Congress identifying non-U.S. persons subject to sanctions under this new provision.[27] The sanctioned individuals will be subject to asset blocking, as provided under the International Emergency Economic Powers Act,[28] as well as the revocation or denial of visas to enter the United States. The President must submit additional reports at least annually identifying non-U.S. persons responsible for human rights violations in the XUAR, including with respect to forced labor, as provided under the Uyghur Human Rights Policy Act.[29]

    V. Compliance Takeaways

    a. Establishing “Clear and Convincing” Evidence

    The Act does not specify what types of evidence might suffice to establish by clear and convincing evidence that goods are not the product of forced labor. Instead, the Act charges the FLETF with publishing an enforcement strategy containing, among other things, “[g]uidance to importers with respect to . . . the type, nature, and extent of evidence that demonstrates that goods originating in the People’s Republic of China . . . were not mined, produced, or manufactured wholly or in part with forced labor.”[30]

    While the Act does not clarify what evidence would be necessary to meet the “clear and convincing” standard, CBP has issued guidance regarding the detailed evidence importers may need to provide to obtain the release of goods detained pursuant to certain WROs. A similar high bar of documentation — if not higher — will likely be required under the UFLPA. In addition to the required Certificate of Origin and importer’s detailed statement,[31] CBP has highlighted the following forms of evidence as helpful to importers seeking the release of shipments detained pursuant to a WRO:

    • An affidavit from the provider of the product;
    • Purchase orders, invoices, and proof of payment;
    • A list of production steps and records for the imported merchandise;
    • Transportation documents;
    • Daily manufacturing process reports;
    • Evidence regarding the importer’s anti-forced labor compliance program; and
    • Any other relevant information that the importer believes may show that the shipments are not subject to the import ban.[32]

    The exact contours of any guidance to be issued by the Forced Labor Enforcement Task Force remains uncertain. However, companies with supply chain exposure to the XUAR should expect compliance with the UFLPA to require significant supply chain diligence and documentation obligations. These obligations may exceed the already high benchmarks on diligence established by the FLETF and CBP through years of sustained engagement with non-governmental organizations and other standard-setting stakeholders who are focused on eradicating forced labor from supply chains globally.

    b. Due Diligence

    The Act instructs the FLETF to issue guidance on “due diligence, effective supply chain tracing, and supply chain management measures” aimed at avoiding the importation of goods produced with forced labor in the XUAR within 180 days of the UFLPA’s enactment.[33]

    Until the FLETF issues this guidance, companies importing goods into the U.S. should look to recognized international standards to conduct due diligence of their supply chains to identify potential ties to the XUAR. For example, the “Xinjiang Supply Chain Business Advisory” identifies the following standards as providing useful guidance on best practices for this due diligence:[34] the UN Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights,[35] the OECD Guidelines on Multinational Enterprises,[36] and the ILO Tripartite Declaration of Principles Concerning Multinational Enterprises and Social Policy.[37] The Advisory warns, however, that third-party audits alone cannot guarantee credible information for due diligence purposes, both because of official harassment of auditors and because of workers’ fear of reprisals for speaking to these auditors.[38] To combat this information gap, the Advisory encourages businesses to collaborate within industry groups to share information and build relationships with Chinese suppliers.[39]

    The unique circumstances of the forced labor crisis in the XUAR may render due diligence efforts insufficient, however. In 2020, the Congressional-Executive Commission on China warned that “due diligence in Xinjiang is not possible” because of official repression and harsh reprisals against whistle blowers, which is made possible by extensive state surveillance in the XUAR.[40] (Notably, this warning coincided with the introduction of the first versions of the bills that would later become the UFLPA.) Moreover, China enacted a series of “blocking statutes” in 2021 authorizing, inter alia, countersanctions and civil liability for Chinese nationals who comply with attempts to enforce foreign laws extraterritorially in China.[41] This threat of liability, coupled with the already-existing reprisals, limits the ability of companies to obtain reliable information about their supply chain activity in the XUAR.

    VI. Timeline for Enforcement

    The Act’s rebuttable presumption against the importation of goods produced in the XUAR or by entities identified by the FLETF is set to take effect 180 days after the UFLPA’s enactment, on June 21, 2022.

    The Act provides that the process for developing the enforcement strategy will proceed as follows:

    1. Within 30 days of enactment (by Jan. 22, 2022): The FLETF will publish a notice soliciting public comment on how best to ensure that goods mined or produced with forced labor in China — and particularly in the XUAR — are not imported into the United States.[42]
    2. No less than 45 days after notice is given (by Mar. 8, 2022): The public, including private sector businesses and non-governmental organizations, will submit comments in response to the FLETF’s notice.[43]
    3. Within 45 days of the public comment period closing (by Apr. 22, 2022): The FLETF will hold a public hearing, inviting witnesses to testify regarding measures that can be taken to trace supply chains for goods mined or produced in whole or in part with forced labor in China and to ensure that goods made with forced labor do not enter the United States.[44]
    4. No later than 180 days after enactment (June 21, 2022): The FLETF, in consultation with the Secretary of Commerce and the Director of National Intelligence, must submit to Congress a strategy for supporting CBP’s processes for enforcing the Act. This strategy must include guidance to importers regarding due diligence and supply chain tracing, as well as the nature and extent of evidence required to show that goods originating in China were not mined or produced with forced labor.The Forced Labor Enforcement Task Force must thereafter submit an updated strategy to Congress annually.[45]

    Notably, the FLETF’s enforcement strategy need only be submitted by the day the Act’s rebuttable presumption takes effect. Therefore, importers may have little or no advance notice as to what evidence they must submit to rebut the presumption against importation.

    VII. Global Efforts to Address Forced Labor in the XUAR

    The U.S. is far from the only country targeting forced labor through new executive and legislative actions. In the past year, jurisdictions around the globe have developed a variety of new strategies for eliminating the importation of goods produced with forced labor in the XUAR. These global efforts vary in scope, and many have not yet taken effect. Companies with supply chain exposure to the XUAR should, however, prepare for an increasingly complex international regulatory landscape in coming years.

    a. The European Union (“EU”)

    On September 15, 2021, the European Commission (“EC”) President Ursula von der Leyen announced plans for a ban on products made by forced labor to be proposed in 2022.[46] While the XUAR was not named, the proposed measure has been viewed to directly target forced labor in this region.[47] Recent reports, however, have highlighted disagreements within the EC as to which department is to spearhead the proposal due to trade sensitivities.[48] Therefore, little progress has been made. Most recently, in December 2021, the EU Executive Vice-President for Trade, Valdis Dombrovskis, warned the EC of the risks of a ban targeting only forced labor in the XUAR being deemed as “discriminatory”. He further noted that the UFLPA “cannot be automatically replicated in the EU,”[49] and argued instead that including the ban within the EU’s proposed Sustainable Corporate Governance Directive (“SCG Directive”) would be more effective.[50]

    The EU has sought to address forced labor more generally via its proposal — in the form of the SCG Directive — for EU-based companies to undertake mandatory human rights due diligence to increase their accountability for human rights and environmental abuses in their supply chains. After lengthy delays, the EC’s proposal for the SCG Directive is now due in early 2022.[51]

    At the moment, it remains unclear whether the EU will follow the U.S. in imposing a stand-alone ban on imports from the XUAR, or whether the proposed measures will be weakened by incorporating them into the SCG Directive proposal.

    b. United Kingdom

    The U.K. does not currently have legislation equivalent to the UFLPA. However, officials within the Foreign Office and the Department for International Trade have suggested that similar efforts to address imports made with forced labor in the XUAR may be imminent.[52] These efforts would build on the U.K.’s ongoing “review of export controls as they apply to Xinjiang . . . to prevent the exports of goods that may contribute to human rights abuses in the region.”[53]

    c. Canada

    In coordination with the United Kingdom and other international partners, the Canadian government released a statement in January 2021 addressing its concerns with the situation in the XUAR. The government announced that it would adopt a number of measures to combat the alleged human rights violations in the XUAR, including:[54]

    1. Prohibition on Imports of Goods Produced by Forced Labor: On November 24, 2021, Sen. Housakos introduced Bill S-204, an act to amend the “Customs Tariff (goods from Xinjiang).”[55] Currently at the second reading stage in the Canadian Senate, this bill is intended to prevent the importation of goods believed to be produced through forced labor.[56] Consistent with Canada’s obligations under the USMCA, this prohibition would prevent the importation of goods believed to be produced using forced labor in the XUAR.
    2. Xinjiang Integrity Declaration for Canadian Companies: Following the amendments made to the Customs Tariff, the Canadian Government established an Integrity Declaration on Doing Business with Xinjiang Entities to guide Canadian companies’ business practices in the region. The Integrity Declaration is mandatory for all Canadian companies that (i) source goods, directly or indirectly, from the XUAR or from entities that rely on Uyghur, (ii) are established in the XUAR, or (iii) seek to engage in the XUAR market. If any such company fails to sign the Integrity Declaration, they will be ineligible to receive support from the Trade Commissioner Service.[57]
    3. Export Controls: The Canadian government stated that it will deny export licenses for the exportation of goods or technologies if it determines that there is a substantial risk that the export would result in a serious violation of human rights under the Export and Import Permits Act 1985.[58]

    d. Australia

    In June 2021, Sen. Patrick introduced the Customs Amendment (Banning Goods Produced by Forced Labour) Bill 2021 to the Australian Senate. The introduction of this bill follows the growing concerns in Australia that the Australian Modern Slavery Act 2018 does not adequately address the issue of state-sanctioned forced labor. Rather limited in its scope, the Modern Slavery Act 2018 requires certain companies to submit annual statements reporting on the risks of modern slavery in their operations and supply chains, as well as any steps they are taking to address such risks. Other entities based or operating in Australia may report this information voluntarily.[59]

    Sen. Patrick’s bill would go a step further in combatting state-sanctioned forced labor by amending the Customs Act 1901 to prohibit the importation into Australia of goods that are produced in whole or in part by forced labor.[60] Although the bill makes no specific reference to China, human rights abuses in the XUAR were repeatedly cited as the proposal’s impetus during the Senate debate. Moreover, if passed, the bill would have the effect of banning the importation of goods made with Uyghur forced labor.[61] The bill was passed through the Australian Senate with cross-party support and the endorsement of the Australian Council of Trade Unions. The bill must now pass the House of Representatives to become law.[62]

    e. New Zealand

    New Zealand has taken a notably softer stance than the U.S. Although New Zealand’s parliament unanimously declared in May 2021 that severe human rights abuses against the Uyghur ethnic minority group were taking place in the XUAR, the motion merely expressed the parliament’s ‘grave concern’[63] over these human rights abuses. The Uyghur community in New Zealand have requested for parliament to take stronger action, such as declaring the oppression of Uyghurs in China a ‘genocide’ and placing a ban on the importation of products made by forced labor in the XUAR.[64]

    _________________________

       [1]   Pub. L. 117-78 (2021).

       [2]   Pub. L. 116-145 (2020).

       [3]   Pub. L. 117-78, § 1(2) (2021).

       [4]   Department of Homeland Security Strategy to Combat Human Trafficking, the Importation of Goods Produced with Forced Labor, and Child Sexual Exploitation (Jan. 2020), U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY, https://www.dhs.gov/sites/default/files/publications/20_0115_plcy_human-trafficking-forced-labor-child-exploit-strategy.pdf.

       [5]   Xinjiang Supply Chain Business Advisory (Jul. 2, 2020, updated Jul. 13, 2021), U.S. Department of the Treasury, https://home.treasury.gov/system/files/126/20210713_xinjiang_advisory_0.pdf.

       [6]   United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement art. 23.6, Jul. 1, 2020, available at https://ustr.gov/trade-agreements/free-trade-agreements/united-states-mexico-canada-agreement.

       [7]   Exec. Order No. 13923, 85 Fed. Reg. 30587 (2020).

       [8]   19 U.S.C. § 4681 (2020).

       [9]   Uyghur Forced Labor Prevention Act, H.R. 6210, 116th Cong. (2019–2020).

      [10]   Uyghur Forced Labor Prevention Act, S. 3471, 116th Cong. (2019–2020).

      [11]   Id. (House bill’s co-sponsors included Dan Crenshaw, Rashida Tlaib, and Ilhan Omar.). Uyghur Forced Labor Prevention Act, S. 3471, 116th Cong. (2019–2020). (Senate bill’s co-sponsors included Tom Cotton, Marsha Blackburn, Dick Durbin, and Elizabeth Warren.).

      [12]   Zachary Basu, House unanimously passes Uyghur forced labor bill, Axios (Dec. 15, 2021), https://www.axios.com/congress-uyghur-forced-labor-bill-d4699c95-16ea-4b42-bda4-eb5baa29326a.html.

      [13]   Pub. L. 117-78 § 3(a) (2021).

      [14]   Id. at § 2(d)(2)(B)(ii).

      [15]   The PRC government has established large-scale “mutual pairing assistance” programs, wherein companies from other provinces of China are incentivized to open satellite factories in the XUAR. See Xinjiang Supply Chain Business Advisory, supra note 5 at 6. The State Department has raised concerns that pairing-assistance programs and other poverty alleviation measures have served as a cover for forced labor and the transfer of Uyghurs and other persecuted minorities to other parts of the country. Forced Labor in China’s Xinjiang Region: Fact Sheet, U.S. Department of State (Jul. 1, 2020), available at https://www.state.gov/forced-labor-in-chinas-xinjiang-region/.

      [16]   Pub. L. 117-78 § 2(d)(2)(B)(v) (2021).

      [17]   19 U.S.C. § 1307.

      [18]   Pub. L. 117-78 § 3(b) (2021).

      [19]   Id. at § 3(c).

      [20]   Id.

      [21]   Id. at § 2(d)(2)(B)(viii)–(ix).

      [22]   CBP Issues Region-Wide Withhold Release Order on Products Made by Slave Labor in Xinjiang, U.S. Customs and Border Protection (Jan. 13, 2021), https://www.cbp.gov/newsroom/national-media-release/cbp-issues-region-wide-withhold-release-order-products-made-slave.

      [23]   China Renewables: The Stretched Ethics of Solar Panels from Xinjiang, The Financial Times (Jan. 9, 2022), available at https://on.ft.com/3ndq1NE.

      [24]   Press Release, Solar Industry Statement on the Passage of the Uyghur Forced Labor Prevention Act, Solar Energy Industries Association (Dec. 16, 2021), available at https://www.seia.org/news/solar-industry-statement-passage-uyghur-forced-labor-prevention-act.

      [25]   Solar Industry Forced Labor Prevention Pledge, Solar Energy Industries Association (Nov. 23, 2021), available at https://www.seia.org/sites/default/files/Solar%20Industry%20Forced%20Labor%20Prevention%20Pledge%20Signatories.pdf.

      [26]   Solar Supply Chain Traceability Protocol 1.0: Industry Guidance, Solar Energy Industries Association (Apr. 2021), available at https://www.seia.org/sites/default/files/2021-04/SEIA-Supply-Chain-Traceability-Protocol-v1.0-April2021.pdf.

      [27]   Pub. L. 116-145 § 6(a)(1) (2020).

      [28]   50 U.S.C. 1701 § 5(c)(1)(A) (1977).

      [29]   Pub. L. 116-145 § 6(a)(1) (2020).

      [30]   Pub. L. 117-78 § 2(d)(6) (2021).

      [31]   19 C.F.R. § 12.43 (2017).

      [32]   See Hoshine Silicon Industry Co. Ltd Withhold Release Order Frequently Asked Questions, U.S. Customs and Border Protection (Nov. 10, 2021), https://www.cbp.gov/trade/programs-administration/forced-labor/hoshine-silicon-industry-co-ltd-withhold-release-order-frequently-asked-questions.

      [33]   Pub. L. 117-78 § 2(d)(6)(a) (2021).

      [34]   Xinjiang Supply Chain Business Advisory, supra note 5 at 7–8.

      [35]   Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights, Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights (2011), available at https://www.ohchr.org/Documents/Publications/GuidingPrinciplesBusinessHR_EN.pdf.

      [36]   OECD Guidelines for Multinational Enterprises, Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (2011), available at https://www.oecd.org/daf/inv/mne/48004323.pdf.

      [37]   Tripartite Declaration of Principles Concerning Multinational Enterprises and Social Policy, International Labour Organization (2017), available at https://www.ilo.org/wcmsp5/groups/public/—ed_emp/—emp_ent/—multi/documents/publication/wcms_094386.pdf.

      [38]   Xinjiang Supply Chain Business Advisory, supra note 5 at 9.

      [39]   Id.

      [40]   Staff of Cong.-Exec. Comm’n on China, Global Supply Chains, Forced Labor, and the Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region (2020), https://www.cecc.gov/sites/chinacommission.house.gov/files/documents/CECC%20Staff%20Report%20March%202020%20-%20Global%20Supply%20Chains%2C%20Forced%20Labor%2C%20and%20the%20Xinjiang%20Uyghur%20Autonomous%20Region.pdf.

      [41]   See MOFCOM Order No. 1 of 2021 on Rules on Counteracting Unjustified Extra-territorial Application of Foreign Legislation and Other Measures, People’s Republic of China Ministry of Commerce (Jan. 9, 2021), available at http://english.mofcom.gov.cn/article/policyrelease/announcement/202101/20210103029708.shtml.

      [42]   Pub. L. 117-78 § 2(a)(1) (2021).

      [43]   Id. at § 2(a)(2).

      [44]   Id. at § 2(b)(1).

      [45]   Id. at § 2(c)–(e).

      [46]   2021 State of the Union Address by President von der Leyen, European Commission (Sep. 15, 2021), available at https://ec.europa.eu/commission/presscorner/detail/en/SPEECH_21_4701.

      [47]   Coalition Statement on European Commission’s Proposed Ban on Products Made with Forced Labour, End Uyghur Forced Labour (Sep. 21, 2021), available at https://enduyghurforcedlabour.org/news/coalition-statement-on-european-commissions-proposed-ban-on-products-made-with-forced-labour/.

      [48]   Sarah Anne Aarup, Ban on Uyghur imports becomes EU’s hot potato, Politico (Oct. 15, 2021), https://www.politico.eu/article/uyghur-china-europe-ban-imports-europe-trade-hot-potato-forced-labor/; Mehreen Kahn, EU urges caution on any ban on imports made with forced labour, The Financial Times (Dec. 23, 2021), https://www.ft.com/content/748a837b-ac51-4f2e-9a5d-3af780ec8444.

      [49]   EU urges caution on any forced labor import ban, The Washington City Times (Dec. 23, 2021), https://thewashingtoncitytimes.com/2021/12/23/eu-urges-caution-on-any-forced-labor-import-ban/.

      [50]   Id.

      [51]   Legislative Proposal on Sustainable Corporate Governance, European Parliament, Legislative Train (Dec. 17, 2021), https://www.europarl.europa.eu/legislative-train/theme-an-economy-that-works-for-people/file-legislative-proposal-on-sustainable-corporate-governance; see also Sustainable Corporate Governance, About this initiative, European Commission, available at https://ec.europa.eu/info/law/better-regulation/have-your-say/initiatives/12548-Sustainable-corporate-governance_en.

      [52]   See Emilia Casalicchio, UK hints at banning Chinese imports with forced labor links, Politico (Dec. 20, 2021), https://www.politico.eu/article/uk-could-impose-chinese-forced-labor-import-ban/.

      [53]   Press Release, UK Government announces business measures over Xinjiang human rights abuses, U.K. Government (Jan. 12, 2021) (U.K.), https://www.gov.uk/government/news/uk-government-announces-business-measures-over-xinjiang-human-rights-abuses; see also Fifth Special Report, Never Again: The UK’s Responsibility to Act on Atrocities in Xinjiang and Beyond: Government’s Response to the Committee’s Second Report, U.K. Parliament (Nov. 1, 2021) (U.K.), available at https://publications.parliament.uk/pa/cm5802/cmselect/cmfaff/840/84002.htm.

    [54]  Canada Announces New Measures to Address Human Rights Abuses in Xinjiang, China, Government of Canada (2021) (Can.), available at https://www.canada.ca/en/global-affairs/news/2021/01/canada-announces-new-measures-to-address-human-rights-abuses-in-xinjiang-china.html.

    [55]See s-204 An Act to amend the Customs Tariff (goods from Xinjiang), Parliament of Canada (Can.) (2021) https://www.parl.ca/legisinfo/en/bill/44-1/s-204.

    [56]  Integrity Declaration on Doing Business with Xinjiang Entities, Government of Canada (2021) (Can.), available at https://www.international.gc.ca/global-affairs-affaires-mondiales/news-nouvelles/2021/2021-01-12-xinjiang-declaration.aspx?lang=eng.

    [57]Id.

    [58]  Global Affairs Canada advisory on doing business with Xinjiang-related entities, Government of Canada (2021) (Can.), available at https://www.international.gc.ca/global-affairs-affaires-mondiales/news-nouvelles/2021/2021-01-12-xinjiang-advisory-avis.aspx?lang=eng.

    [59]See Modern Slavery Act 2018, Federal Register of Legislation (Austl.), https://www.legislation.gov.au/Details/C2018A00153.

    [60]See Customs Amendment (Banning Goods Produced by Forced Labour) Bill 2021 (Austl.), https://www.aph.gov.au/Parliamentary_Business/Bills_Legislation/Bills_Search_Results/Result?bId=s1307

    [61]  Daniel Hurst, Australia Senate passes bill banning Imports made using Forced Labour, The Guardian, (Aug. 23, 2021), https://www.theguardian.com/australia-news/2021/aug/23/australian-senate-poised-to-pass-bill-banning-imports-made-using-forced-labour.

    [62]  Australian Senate Passes Forced Labour Bill, Freedom United (Aug. 23, 2021), https://www.freedomunited.org/news/australian-senate-passes-forced-labor-bill/.

    [63]  China slams New Zealand parliament’s motion on Uighur abuses, Al Jazeera (May 6, 2021), https://www.aljazeera.com/news/2021/5/6/china-slams-new-zealand-parliaments-uighur-concerns.

    [64]  Julia Hollingsworth, New Zealand is a Five Eyes outlier on China. It may have to pick a side, CNN (June 4, 2021), https://edition.cnn.com/2021/06/03/asia/new-zealand-xinjiang-china-intl-hnk-dst/index.html.

     


    The following Gibson Dunn lawyers assisted in preparing this client update: Judith Alison Lee, Selina Sagayam, Susanne Bullock, Michael Murphy and Christopher Timura, with Sean Brennan, Ruby Taylor, Natalie Harris, and Freddie Batho, recent law graduates working in the firm’s London and Washington, D.C. offices who are not yet admitted to practice law.

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    Источник: https://www.gibsondunn.com/the-uyghur-forced-labor-prevention-act-goes-into-effect-in-the-united-states/
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    Golden State Warriors suffer 'humiliating' 53-point loss to Toronto Raptors

    Apr 2, 2021
    • Nick FriedellESPN Staff Writer

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        Nick Friedell is the Chicago Bulls beat reporter for ESPN Chicago. Friedell is a graduate of the S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications at Syracuse University and joined ESPNChicago.com for its launch in April 2009.

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    The Golden State Warriors suffered one of the most "humiliating" losses in franchise history Friday night during a 53-point defeat at the hands of the Toronto Raptors -- a team that came into the game having lost 13 of its past 14 games.

    "You saw it," Warriors coach Steve Kerr said after the 130-77 loss. "We just got destroyed. Not a whole lot to be said. Humiliating for everybody involved."

    The Warriors, who trailed by as many as 61 points in the second half, set some dubious marks in a game in which both Stephen Curry (tailbone soreness) and Draymond Green (left finger sprain) sat out.

    The Raptors outscored the Warriors by 51 points in the second and third quarters, the largest point differential over a two-quarter span within a game in NBA history, according to Elias Sports Bureau research. The Warriors became the fourth team in the past 25 seasons to trail by at least 60 points in a game, according to ESPN Stats & Information research. The Raptors' 53-point margin of victory is also tied for the third largest in league history by a team that is 10 or more games below .500.

    "I just think the game went south on us quickly and we got demoralized," Kerr said. "I think without Steph and Draymond out there I think we were a little bit rudderless when things went south. We didn't have the internal fight that we needed to kind of get over the hump."

    That was evident in a variety of different areas, but offensively, the stat that might be most jarring for the Warriors is the fact that they became the only team in the past 25 years to lose a game by at least 50 points and not score a fast-break point. They had only one fast-break attempt the whole game and missed it. It's a huge reason Kerr was so frustrated with his team's lack of ball movement.

    "Our team has www 53 co0m built on sharing the ball," Kerr said. "When you move the ball in this game, that's when the magic happens, when you build an energy, a karma, the shots tend to go in if you move the ball and you share it. And I just saw one possession after another tonight that was one pass and a shot. We've got to play for each other, and I didn't think we did that tonight."

    The Warriors, now 23-26, sit in 10th place in the Western Conference and have struggled all season to find consistency. Last week, veteran Kevon Looney acknowledged that Curry and Green shared messages for their teammates about looking within and trying to play better. After Friday's embarrassing performance, veteran Kent Bazemore said injured former All-Star Klay Thompson shared some thoughts with several teammates after the game.

    "It's a hard pill for them to swallow," Bazemore said of the Warriors' missing three core players. "We're talking about -- and Klay is back there as well, these guys [have] five straight Finals appearances. This is by any means not acceptable by them at all. This hurts them more than anything. Klay was fired up after the game. And this has been the toughest two years watching his guys out there, and him not being able to help. So I think it's lit a fire up under him, and Steph and Draymond, they know how important they are to us."

    For Thompson, the loss was even tougher to watch given that he is currently rehabbing an Achilles injury that has forced him to miss his second straight season. Bazemore said Thompson's message to a few teammates was simple in its point.

    "He was just kind of going off about how he missed the game and how it's just not acceptable to lose this way," Bazemore said. "He's fired up, man. It's hard watching, regardless if you're playing or not playing."

    The good news for the Warriors is that Curry is expected to be back Sunday against the Atlanta Hawks. Green's status remains unclear given that he was initially expected to play on Friday, but after trying to warm up he told the coaching staff that he couldn't catch the ball with his left hand because of the finger injury. Green told Kerr he could play, but the veteran coach made the decision for Green to sit.

    As the Warriors wait for their stars to heal, they've got a looming issue with the young center they were hoping would help them this season. Big man James Wiseman, 20, had another rough night against the Raptors, struggling on both ends of the floor, which has been an ongoing theme since the All-Star break. Kerr said the Warriors want to simplify parts of the game plan for Wiseman so that he can build his confidence back up.

    "As a young player, a lot of guys try to do too much," Kerr said. "I think that's what's happening with James right now. I think he's such a gifted guy, and he's always been able to do whatever he wanted on the floor, but the NBA, the game happens so fast that you just have to sort of strip it down to 'let's be good at the things that I can be good at right now and then my game will expand as we go forward.' And that's what we're trying to share with James and teach him.

    "But the only way to learn that is to feel it, and he's feeling it. So he will grow from here and we'll stay positive with him, we'll try to peel things back and keep things really simple and help him build his confidence over the last quarter of the season."

    As the Warriors www comerica com businessconnect to see more development down the stretch from the No. 2 overall pick in the 2020 draft, they do so with a group that hit the low point of its season Friday night. Kerr is hopeful his team will bounce back after two straight defeats, but he also understands that each individual player has to find his own motivation to get things back on track before it's too late.

    "As a coach, you try to navigate the season with your team as best www 53 co0m can," Kerr said. "So there's times for humor, there's times for joy, there's times for serious discussion and soul-searching. This is a time for soul-searching for sure."

    © ESPN Enterprises, Inc. All rights reserved.
    Источник: https://www.espn.com/nba/story/_/id/31185643/golden-state-warriors-suffer-humiliating-53-point-loss-toronto-raptors

    The Uyghur Forced Labor Prevention Act Goes Into Effect in the United States

    January 14, 2022

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    On December 23, 2021, President Biden signed the Uyghur Forced Labor Prevention Act (the “UFLPA” or “Act”) into law.[1] The UFLPA, which received widespread bipartisan support in Congress, is the latest in a line of U.S. efforts to address the plight of Uyghurs and other persecuted minority groups in China’s Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region (the “XUAR”).

    A key feature of the Act is the creation of a rebuttable presumption that all goods manufactured even partially in the XUAR are the product of forced labor and therefore not entitled to entry at U.S. ports. The Act also builds on prior legislation, such as 2020’s Uyghur Human Rights Policy Activate your us bank credit card by expanding that Act’s authorization of sanctions to cover foreign individuals responsible for human rights abuses related to forced labor.

    I. Background

    In recent years, both the executive and legislative branches have demonstrated an increased interest in “lead[ing] the international community in ending forced labor practices wherever such practices occur,”[3] with a particular focus on the XUAR.

    2020 saw a boom in efforts across agencies and the houses of Congress, beginning with the Department of Homeland Security’s January publication of a Department-wide strategy to combat forced labor in supply chains.[4] Later that year, DHS joined the U.S. Departments of State, Treasury and Commerce to issue a joint advisory warning of heightened risks of forced labor for businesses with supply chain exposure to the XUAR.[5]

    The U.S. also emphasized eliminating forced labor in supply chains through its international obligations at this time. The 2020 United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement (“USMCA”) required each party to this free trade agreement to “prohibit the importation of goods into its territory from other sources produced in whole or in part by forced or compulsory labor.”[6] To carry out this obligation, President Trump issued an executive order in May 2020 establishing the Forced Labor Enforcement Task Force (“FLETF”), chaired by the Secretary of Homeland Security and including representatives from the Departments of State, Treasury, Justice, Labor, and the Office of the U.S. Trade Representative.[7] The implementing bill of the USMCA requires the FLETF to serve as the central hub for the U.S. government’s enforcement of the prohibition on imports made through forced labor.[8]

    In Congress, Rep. James McGovern (D) and Sen. Marco Rubio (R) — co-chairs of the Congressional-Executive Commission on China — introduced the first versions of the UFLPA in the House of Representatives[9] and the Senate[10] in March 2020. The bill received unusual, wide bipartisan support, with co-sponsors among Congress’s most conservative and most liberal members.[11] Each bill passed in its respective house in early 2021, and a compromise bill — reconciling differences of timing and reporting processes between the two versions — was sent to the President in mid-December[12] before being signed into law.

    II. Presumptive Ban on Imports from the XUAR

    The UFLPA’s trade provisions are notable both for their expansive scope and the heightened evidentiary standard required to rebut the Act’s presumptive prohibition on all imports from the XUAR.

    a. Scope of the Import Ban

    The UFLPA’s scope is broad, instructing U.S. Customs and Border Protection (“CBP”) to presume that “any goods, wares, articles, and merchandise mined, jose altuve injury, or manufactured wholly or in part in” the XUAR were made with forced labor and are therefore unfit for entry at any U.S. ports.[13]

    This presumption extends also to goods, wares, articles, and merchandise produced by a variety of entities identified by the FLETF in its strategy to implement the Act. This includes entities that work with the XUAR government to recruit, transport, or receive forced labor from the XUAR,[14] as well as entities that participate in “poverty alleviation” and “pairing-assistance” programs[15] in the XUAR.[16]

    CBP has traditionally had the authority to prevent the importation of “[a]ll goods, wares, articles, and merchandise mined, produced, or manufactured wholly or in part in any foreign country by. . forced labor” through the issuance of Withhold Release Orders (“WROs”).[17] The UFLPA broadens this power by creating a rebuttable presumption that all articles produced in whole bank of america full site on iphone in part in the XUAR or by entities that source material from persons involved in XUAR government forced labor schemes are automatically barred from entry into the United States, even absent a WRO or any specific showing of forced labor in the supply chain.

    b. Exceptions to the Import Ban

    Despite this broad prohibition, importers of goods covered by the UFLPA may still be able to rebut the presumption against importation. Www 53 co0m Act specifies that the presumption will not be applied if the Commissioner of CBP determines that:

    1. The importer of record has:
      • Fully complied with all due diligence and evidentiary guidance established by the FLETF pursuant to the Act, along with any associated implementing regulations; and
      • Completely and substantively responded to all CBP inquiries seeking to ascertain whether the goods were produced with forced labor; and
    2. “Clear and convincing” evidence shows that the goods were not produced wholly or in part with forced labor.[18]

    Each time the Commissioner determines that an exception to the import ban is warranted under the criteria above, the Commissioner must submit a report to Congress within 30 days, identifying the goods subject to the exception and the evidence upon which the determination is based.[19] The Commissioner must make all such reports available to the public.[20]

    III. High-Priority Enforcement Sectors

    As part of its enforcement strategy, the UFLPA instructs the Forced Labor Enforcement Task Force to prepare both a list of high-priority sectors subject to CBP enforcement, and a td bank job openings enforcement plan for each of these high-priority sectors.[21] The Act mandates that cotton, tomatoes, and polysilicon must be among the high-priority sectors, building upon CBP’s existing WRO against all cotton and tomato products produced in the XUAR.[22]

    The addition of polysilicon on this list of high-priority sectors directly impacts the U.S. solar energy industry: nearly half of the world’s polysilicon — a key material for the manufacture of solar panels — is produced in the XUAR.[23] Despite the dominance of Chinese polysilicon, however, solar industry groups have embraced the passage state bank of whittington online banking the UFLPA and are encouraging solar companies to move their supply chains out of the XUAR.[24] Corporate responsibility concerns surrounding the sourcing of polysilicon from the XUAR have been circulating for at least a year, and the solar industry groups have acted proactively to create standards and procedures to trace and audit supply chains of this important resource. To further this industry-wide goal of eradicating forced labor from solar supply chains,[25] these industry groups recently published a “Solar Supply Chain Traceability Protocol.”[26]

    IV. Sanctions

    The UFLPA also amends the Uyghur Human Rights Policy Act of 2020 to underscore that sanctions may be imposed due to “[s]erious human rights abuses in connection with forced labor” related to the XUAR. Within 180 days of enactment, the President www capital one online banking login required to submit an initial report to Congress identifying non-U.S. persons subject to sanctions under this new provision.[27] The sanctioned individuals will be subject to asset blocking, as provided under the International Emergency Economic Powers Act,[28] as well as the www 53 co0m or denial of visas to enter the United States. The President must submit additional reports at least annually identifying non-U.S. persons responsible for human rights violations in the XUAR, including with respect to forced labor, as provided under the Uyghur Human Rights Policy Act.[29]

    V. Compliance Takeaways

    a. Establishing “Clear and Convincing” Evidence

    The Act does not specify what types of evidence might suffice to establish by clear and convincing evidence that goods are not the product of forced labor. Instead, the Act charges the FLETF with publishing an enforcement strategy containing, among other things, “[g]uidance to importers with respect to. . the type, nature, and extent of evidence that demonstrates that goods originating in the People’s Republic of China. . were not mined, produced, or manufactured wholly or in part with forced labor.”[30]

    While the Act does not clarify what evidence would be necessary to meet the “clear and convincing” standard, CBP has issued guidance regarding the detailed evidence importers may need to provide to obtain the release of goods detained pursuant to certain WROs. A similar high bar of documentation — if not higher — will likely be required under the UFLPA. In addition to the required Certificate of Origin and importer’s detailed statement,[31] CBP has highlighted the following forms of evidence as helpful to importers seeking the release of shipments detained pursuant to a WRO:

    • An affidavit from the provider of the product;
    • Purchase orders, invoices, and proof of payment;
    • A list of production steps and records for the imported merchandise;
    • Transportation documents;
    • Daily manufacturing process reports;
    • Evidence regarding the importer’s anti-forced labor compliance program; and
    • Any other relevant information that the importer believes may show that the shipments are not subject to the import ban.[32]

    The exact contours of any guidance to be issued by the Forced Labor Enforcement Task Force remains uncertain. However, companies with supply chain exposure to the XUAR should expect compliance with the UFLPA to require significant supply chain diligence and documentation obligations. These obligations may exceed the already high benchmarks on diligence established by the FLETF and CBP through years of sustained engagement with non-governmental organizations and other standard-setting stakeholders who are focused on eradicating forced labor from supply chains globally.

    b. Due Diligence

    The Act instructs the FLETF to issue guidance on “due diligence, effective supply chain tracing, and supply chain management measures” aimed at avoiding the importation of goods produced with forced labor in the XUAR within 180 days of the UFLPA’s enactment.[33]

    Until the FLETF issues this guidance, companies importing goods into the U.S. should look to recognized international standards to conduct due diligence of their supply chains to identify potential ties to the XUAR. For example, the “Xinjiang Supply Chain Business Advisory” identifies the following standards as providing useful guidance on best practices for this due diligence:[34] the UN Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights,[35] the OECD Guidelines on Multinational Enterprises,[36] and the ILO Tripartite Declaration of Principles Concerning Multinational Enterprises and Social Policy.[37] The Advisory warns, however, that third-party audits alone cannot guarantee credible information for due diligence purposes, both because of official harassment of auditors and because of workers’ fear of reprisals for speaking to these auditors.[38] To combat this information gap, the Advisory encourages businesses to collaborate within industry groups to share information and build relationships with Chinese suppliers.[39]

    The unique circumstances of the forced labor crisis in the XUAR may render due diligence efforts insufficient, however. In 2020, the Congressional-Executive Commission on China warned that “due diligence in Xinjiang is www 53 co0m possible” because of official repression and harsh reprisals against whistle blowers, which is made possible by extensive state surveillance in the XUAR.[40] (Notably, this warning coincided with the introduction of the first versions of the bills that would later become the UFLPA.) Moreover, China enacted a series of “blocking statutes” in 2021 authorizing, inter alia, countersanctions and civil liability for Chinese nationals who comply with attempts to enforce foreign laws extraterritorially in China.[41] This threat of liability, coupled with the already-existing reprisals, limits the ability of companies to obtain reliable information about their supply chain activity in the XUAR.

    VI. Timeline for Enforcement

    The Act’s rebuttable presumption against the importation of goods produced in the XUAR or by entities identified by the FLETF is set to take effect 180 days after the UFLPA’s enactment, on June 21, 2022.

    The Act provides that the process for developing the enforcement strategy will proceed as follows:

    1. Within 30 days of enactment (by Jan. 22, 2022): The FLETF will publish a notice soliciting public comment on how best to ensure that goods mined or produced with forced labor in China — and particularly in the XUAR — are not imported into the United States.[42]
    2. No less than 45 days after notice is given (by Mar. 8, 2022): The public, including private sector businesses and non-governmental organizations, will submit comments in response to the FLETF’s notice.[43]
    3. Within 45 days of the public comment period closing (by Apr. 22, 2022): The FLETF will hold a public hearing, inviting witnesses to testify regarding measures that can pnc bank online mortgage payment taken to trace supply chains for goods mined or produced in whole or in part with forced labor in China and to ensure that goods made with forced labor do not enter the United States.[44]
    4. No later than 180 days after enactment (June 21, 2022): The FLETF, in consultation with the Secretary of Commerce and the Director of National Intelligence, must submit to Congress a strategy for supporting CBP’s processes for enforcing the Act. This strategy must include guidance to importers regarding due diligence and supply chain tracing, as well as the nature and extent of evidence required to show that goods originating in China were not mined or produced with forced labor.The Forced Labor Enforcement Task Force must thereafter submit an updated strategy to Congress annually.[45]

    Notably, the FLETF’s enforcement strategy need only be submitted by the day the Act’s rebuttable presumption takes effect. Therefore, importers may have little or no advance notice as to what evidence they must submit to rebut the presumption against importation.

    VII. Global Efforts to Address Forced Labor in the XUAR

    The U.S. is far from the only country targeting forced labor through new executive and legislative actions. In the past year, jurisdictions around the globe have developed a variety of new strategies for eliminating the importation of goods produced with forced labor in the XUAR. These global efforts vary in scope, and many have www 53 co0m yet taken effect. Companies with supply chain exposure to the XUAR should, however, prepare for an increasingly complex international regulatory landscape in coming years.

    a. The European Union (“EU”)

    On September 15, 2021, the European Commission (“EC”) President Ursula von der Leyen announced plans for a ban on products made by forced labor to be proposed in 2022.[46] While the XUAR was not named, the proposed measure has been viewed to directly target forced labor in this region.[47] Recent reports, however, have highlighted disagreements within the EC as to which department is to spearhead the proposal due to trade sensitivities.[48] Therefore, little progress has been made. Most recently, in December 2021, the EU Executive Vice-President for Trade, Valdis Dombrovskis, warned the EC of the risks of a ban targeting only forced labor in the XUAR being deemed as “discriminatory”. He further noted that the UFLPA “cannot be automatically replicated in the EU,”[49] and argued instead that including the ban within the EU’s proposed Sustainable Corporate Governance Directive (“SCG Directive”) would be more effective.[50]

    The EU has sought to address forced labor more generally via its proposal — in the form of the SCG Directive — for EU-based companies to undertake mandatory human rights due diligence to increase their accountability for human rights and environmental abuses in their supply chains. Www 53 co0m lengthy delays, the EC’s proposal for the SCG Directive is now due in early 2022.[51]

    At the moment, it remains unclear whether the EU will follow autozone rockland maine U.S. in imposing a stand-alone ban on imports from the XUAR, or whether the proposed measures will be weakened by incorporating them into the SCG Directive proposal.

    b. United Kingdom

    The U.K. does not currently have legislation equivalent to the UFLPA. However, officials within the Foreign Office and the Department for International Trade have suggested that similar efforts to address imports made with forced labor in the XUAR may be imminent.[52] These efforts would build on the U.K.’s ongoing “review of export controls as they apply to Xinjiang. . to prevent the exports of goods that may contribute to human rights abuses in the region.”[53]

    c. Canada

    In coordination with the United Kingdom and other international partners, the Canadian government released a statement in January 2021 addressing its concerns with the situation in the XUAR. The government announced that it would adopt a number of measures to combat the alleged human rights violations in the XUAR, including:[54]

    1. Prohibition on Imports of Goods Produced by Forced Labor: On November 24, 2021, Sen. Housakos introduced Bill S-204, an act to amend the “Customs Tariff (goods from Xinjiang).”[55] Currently at the second reading stage in the Canadian Senate, this bill is intended to prevent the importation of goods believed to be produced through forced labor.[56] Consistent with Canada’s obligations under the USMCA, this prohibition would prevent the importation of goods believed to be produced using forced labor in the XUAR.
    2. Xinjiang Www 53 co0m Declaration for Canadian Companies: Following the amendments made to the Customs Tariff, the Canadian Government established an Integrity Declaration on Doing Business with Xinjiang Entities to guide Canadian companies’ business practices in the region. The Integrity Declaration is mandatory for all Canadian companies that (i) source goods, directly or indirectly, from the XUAR or from entities that rely on Uyghur, (ii) are established in the XUAR, or (iii) seek to engage in the XUAR market. If any such company fails to sign the Integrity Declaration, they will be ineligible to receive support from the Trade Commissioner Service.[57]
    3. Export Controls: The Canadian government stated that it will deny export licenses for the exportation of goods or technologies if it determines that there is a substantial risk that the export would result in a serious violation of human rights under the Export and Import Permits Act 1985.[58]

    d. Australia

    In June 2021, Sen. Patrick introduced the Customs Amendment (Banning Goods Produced by Forced Labour) Bill 2021 to the Australian Senate. The introduction of this bill follows the growing concerns in Australia that the Australian Modern Slavery Act 2018 does not adequately address the issue of state-sanctioned forced labor. Rather limited in its scope, the Modern Slavery Act 2018 requires certain companies to submit annual statements reporting on the risks of modern slavery in their operations and supply chains, as well as any steps they are taking to address such risks. Other entities based or operating in Australia may report this information voluntarily.[59]

    Sen. Patrick’s bill would go a step further in combatting state-sanctioned forced labor by amending the Customs Act 1901 to prohibit the importation into Australia of goods that are produced in whole or in part by forced labor.[60] Although the bill makes no specific reference to China, human rights abuses in the XUAR were repeatedly cited as the proposal’s impetus during the Senate debate. Moreover, if passed, the bill would have the effect of banning the importation of goods made with Uyghur forced labor.[61] The bill was passed through the Australian Senate with cross-party support and the endorsement of the Australian Council of Trade Unions. The bill must now pass the House of Representatives to become law.[62]

    e. New Zealand

    New Zealand has taken a notably softer stance than the U.S. Although New Zealand’s parliament unanimously declared in May 2021 that severe human rights abuses against the Uyghur ethnic minority group were taking place in the XUAR, the motion merely expressed the parliament’s ‘grave concern’[63] over these human rights abuses. The Uyghur community in New Zealand have requested for parliament to take stronger action, such as declaring the oppression of Uyghurs in China a ‘genocide’ and placing a ban on the importation of products made by forced labor in the XUAR.[64]

    _________________________

       [1]   Pub. L. 117-78 (2021).

       [2]   Pub. L. 116-145 (2020).

       [3]   Pub. L. 117-78, § 1(2) (2021).

       [4]   Department of Homeland Security Strategy to Combat Human Trafficking, the Importation of Goods Produced with Forced Labor, and Child Sexual Exploitation (Jan. 2020), U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY, https://www.dhs.gov/sites/default/files/publications/20_0115_plcy_human-trafficking-forced-labor-child-exploit-strategy.pdf.

       [5]   Xinjiang Supply Chain Business Advisory (Jul. 2, 2020, updated Jul. 13, 2021), U.S. Department of the Treasury, https://home.treasury.gov/system/files/126/20210713_xinjiang_advisory_0.pdf.

       [6]   United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement art. 23.6, Jul. 1, 2020, available at https://ustr.gov/trade-agreements/free-trade-agreements/united-states-mexico-canada-agreement.

       [7]   Exec. Order No. 13923, 85 Fed. Reg. 30587 (2020).

       [8]   19 U.S.C. § 4681 (2020).

       [9]   Uyghur Forced Labor Prevention Act, H.R. 6210, 116th Cong. (2019–2020).

      [10]   Uyghur Forced Labor Prevention Act, S. 3471, 116th Cong. (2019–2020).

      [11]   Id. (House bill’s co-sponsors included Dan Crenshaw, Rashida Tlaib, and Ilhan Omar.). Uyghur Forced Labor Prevention Act, S. 3471, 116th Cong. (2019–2020). (Senate bill’s co-sponsors included Tom Cotton, Marsha Blackburn, Dick Durbin, and Elizabeth Warren.).

      [12]   Zachary Basu, House unanimously passes Uyghur forced labor bill, Axios (Dec. 15, 2021), https://www.axios.com/congress-uyghur-forced-labor-bill-d4699c95-16ea-4b42-bda4-eb5baa29326a.html.

      [13]   Pub. L. 117-78 § 3(a) (2021).

      [14]   Id. at § 2(d)(2)(B)(ii).

      [15]   The PRC government has established large-scale “mutual pairing assistance” programs, wherein companies from other provinces of China are incentivized to open satellite factories in the XUAR. See Xinjiang Supply Chain Business Advisory, supra note 5 at 6. The State Department has raised concerns that pairing-assistance programs and other poverty alleviation measures have served as a cover for forced labor and the transfer of Uyghurs and other persecuted minorities to other parts of the country. Forced Labor in China’s Xinjiang Region: Fact Sheet, U.S. Department of State (Jul. 1, 2020), available at https://www.state.gov/forced-labor-in-chinas-xinjiang-region/.

      [16]   Tiny homes for sale in nc. L. 117-78 § 2(d)(2)(B)(v) (2021).

      [17]   19 U.S.C. § 1307.

      [18]   Pub. L. 117-78 § 3(b) (2021).

      [19]   Id. at § 3(c).

      [20]   Id.

      [21]   Id. at § 2(d)(2)(B)(viii)–(ix).

      [22]   CBP Issues Region-Wide Withhold Release Order on Products Made by Slave Labor in Xinjiang, U.S. Customs and Border Protection (Jan. 13, 2021), https://www.cbp.gov/newsroom/national-media-release/cbp-issues-region-wide-withhold-release-order-products-made-slave.

      [23]   Amazon force jobs near me Renewables: The Stretched Ethics of Solar Panels from Xinjiang, The Financial Times (Jan. 9, 2022), available at https://on.ft.com/3ndq1NE.

      [24]   Press Release, Solar Industry Statement on the Passage of the Uyghur Forced Labor Prevention Act, Solar Energy Industries Association (Dec. 16, 2021), available at https://www.seia.org/news/solar-industry-statement-passage-uyghur-forced-labor-prevention-act.

      [25]   Solar Industry Forced Labor Prevention Pledge, Solar Energy Industries Association (Nov. 23, 2021), available at https://www.seia.org/sites/default/files/Solar%20Industry%20Forced%20Labor%20Prevention%20Pledge%20Signatories.pdf.

      [26]   Solar Supply Chain Traceability Protocol 1.0: Industry Guidance, Solar Energy Industries Association (Apr. 2021), available at https://www.seia.org/sites/default/files/2021-04/SEIA-Supply-Chain-Traceability-Protocol-v1.0-April2021.pdf.

      [27]   Pub. L. 116-145 § 6(a)(1) (2020).

      [28]   50 U.S.C. 1701 § 5(c)(1)(A) (1977).

      [29]   Pub. L. 116-145 § 6(a)(1) (2020).

      [30]   Pub. L. 117-78 § 2(d)(6) (2021).

      [31]   19 C.F.R. § 12.43 (2017).

      [32]   See Hoshine Silicon Industry Co. Ltd Withhold Release Order Frequently Asked Questions, U.S. Customs and Border Protection (Nov. 10, 2021), https://www.cbp.gov/trade/programs-administration/forced-labor/hoshine-silicon-industry-co-ltd-withhold-release-order-frequently-asked-questions.

      [33]   Pub. L. 117-78 § 2(d)(6)(a) (2021).

      [34]   Xinjiang Supply Chain Business Advisory, supra note 5 at 7–8.

      [35]   Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights, Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights (2011), available at https://www.ohchr.org/Documents/Publications/GuidingPrinciplesBusinessHR_EN.pdf.

      [36]   OECD Guidelines for Multinational Enterprises, Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (2011), available at https://www.oecd.org/daf/inv/mne/48004323.pdf.

      [37]   Tripartite Declaration of Principles Concerning Multinational Enterprises and Social Policy, International Labour Organization (2017), available at https://www.ilo.org/wcmsp5/groups/public/—ed_emp/—emp_ent/—multi/documents/publication/wcms_094386.pdf.

      [38]   Xinjiang Supply Chain Business Advisory, supra note 5 at 9.

      [39]   Id.

      [40]   Staff of Cong.-Exec. Comm’n on China, Global Supply Chains, Forced Labor, and the Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region (2020), https://www.cecc.gov/sites/chinacommission.house.gov/files/documents/CECC%20Staff%20Report%20March%202020%20-%20Global%20Supply%20Chains%2C%20Forced%20Labor%2C%20and%20the%20Xinjiang%20Uyghur%20Autonomous%20Region.pdf.

      [41]   See MOFCOM Order No. 1 of 2021 on Rules on Counteracting Unjustified Extra-territorial Application of Foreign Legislation and Other Measures, People’s Republic of China Ministry of Commerce (Jan. 9, 2021), available at http://english.mofcom.gov.cn/article/policyrelease/announcement/202101/20210103029708.shtml.

      [42]   Pub. L. 117-78 § 2(a)(1) (2021).

      [43]   Id. at § 2(a)(2).

      [44]   Id. at § 2(b)(1).

      [45]   Id. at § 2(c)–(e).

      [46]   2021 State of the Union Address by President von der Leyen, European Commission (Sep. 15, 2021), available at https://ec.europa.eu/commission/presscorner/detail/en/SPEECH_21_4701.

      [47]   Coalition Statement on European Commission’s Proposed Ban on Products Made with Forced Labour, End Uyghur Forced Labour (Sep. 21, 2021), available at https://enduyghurforcedlabour.org/news/coalition-statement-on-european-commissions-proposed-ban-on-products-made-with-forced-labour/.

      [48]   Sarah Anne Aarup, Ban on Uyghur imports becomes EU’s hot potato, Politico (Oct. 15, 2021), https://www.politico.eu/article/uyghur-china-europe-ban-imports-europe-trade-hot-potato-forced-labor/; Mehreen Kahn, EU urges caution on any ban on imports made with forced labour, The Financial Times (Dec. 23, 2021), https://www.ft.com/content/748a837b-ac51-4f2e-9a5d-3af780ec8444.

      [49]   EU urges caution on any forced labor import ban, The Washington City Times (Dec. 23, 2021), https://thewashingtoncitytimes.com/2021/12/23/eu-urges-caution-on-any-forced-labor-import-ban/.

      [50]   Id.

      [51]   Legislative Proposal on Sustainable Corporate Governance, European Parliament, Legislative Train (Dec. 17, 2021), https://www.europarl.europa.eu/legislative-train/theme-an-economy-that-works-for-people/file-legislative-proposal-on-sustainable-corporate-governance; see also Sustainable Corporate Governance, About this initiative, European Commission, available at https://ec.europa.eu/info/law/better-regulation/have-your-say/initiatives/12548-Sustainable-corporate-governance_en.

      [52]   See Emilia Casalicchio, UK hints at banning Chinese imports with forced labor links, Politico (Dec. 20, 2021), https://www.politico.eu/article/uk-could-impose-chinese-forced-labor-import-ban/.

      [53]   Press Release, UK Government announces business measures over Xinjiang human rights abuses, U.K. Government (Jan. 12, 2021) (U.K.), https://www.gov.uk/government/news/uk-government-announces-business-measures-over-xinjiang-human-rights-abuses; see also Fifth Special Report, Never Again: The UK’s Responsibility to Act on Atrocities in Xinjiang and Beyond: Government’s Response to the Committee’s Second Report, U.K. Parliament (Nov. 1, 2021) (U.K.), available at https://publications.parliament.uk/pa/cm5802/cmselect/cmfaff/840/84002.htm.

    [54]  Canada Announces New Measures to Address Human Rights Abuses in Xinjiang, China, Government of Canada (2021) (Can.), available at https://www.canada.ca/en/global-affairs/news/2021/01/canada-announces-new-measures-to-address-human-rights-abuses-in-xinjiang-china.html.

    [55]See s-204 An Act to amend the Customs Tariff (goods from Xinjiang), Parliament of Canada (Can.) (2021) https://www.parl.ca/legisinfo/en/bill/44-1/s-204.

    [56]  Integrity Declaration on Doing Business with Xinjiang Entities, Government of Canada (2021) (Can.), available at https://www.international.gc.ca/global-affairs-affaires-mondiales/news-nouvelles/2021/2021-01-12-xinjiang-declaration.aspx?lang=eng.

    [57]Id.

    [58]  Global Affairs Canada advisory on doing business with Xinjiang-related entities, Government www 53 co0m Canada (2021) (Can.), available at https://www.international.gc.ca/global-affairs-affaires-mondiales/news-nouvelles/2021/2021-01-12-xinjiang-advisory-avis.aspx?lang=eng.

    [59]See Modern Slavery Act 2018, Federal Register of Legislation (Austl.), https://www.legislation.gov.au/Details/C2018A00153.

    [60]See Customs Amendment (Banning Goods Produced by Forced Labour) Bill 2021 (Austl.), https://www.aph.gov.au/Parliamentary_Business/Bills_Legislation/Bills_Search_Results/Result?bId=s1307

    [61]  Daniel Hurst, Australia Senate passes bill banning Imports made using Forced Labour, The Guardian, (Aug. 23, 2021), https://www.theguardian.com/australia-news/2021/aug/23/australian-senate-poised-to-pass-bill-banning-imports-made-using-forced-labour.

    [62]  Australian Senate Passes Forced Labour Bill, Freedom United (Aug. 23, 2021), https://www.freedomunited.org/news/australian-senate-passes-forced-labor-bill/.

    [63]  China slams New Zealand parliament’s motion on Uighur abuses, Al Jazeera (May 6, 2021), https://www.aljazeera.com/news/2021/5/6/china-slams-new-zealand-parliaments-uighur-concerns.

    [64]  Julia Hollingsworth, New Zealand is a Five Eyes outlier on China. It may have to pick a side, CNN (June 4, 2021), https://edition.cnn.com/2021/06/03/asia/new-zealand-xinjiang-china-intl-hnk-dst/index.html.

     


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    With fresh looks, easier cargo access and more responsive performance, the all-new 2022 Civic Hatchback is taking five-door thrills to a whole new level.

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    www 53 co0m Sport Touring shown in Smokey Mauve Pearl* at $29,850 MSRP.* 30 city/37 highway mpg rating.*

    The 200-horsepower* engine, sport-tuned MacPherson strut front suspension and 6-speed manual transmission on the Civic Si offer brisk acceleration, agile handling and total control through every turn.

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    Shown in Blazing Orange Pearl* at $27,300 MSRP.* 27 city/37 highway mpg rating.*

    With a 55-mpg city rating,* this hybrid is more than just a beautiful ride. It’s also an efficient and environmentally responsible vehicle.

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    Touring shown in Cosmic Blue Metallic*at $29,790 MSRP.*51 city/45 highway mpg rating.*

    Источник: https://automobiles.honda.com/

    FIFTH THIRD BANCORP

    Fifth Third Bank today announced changes to its retirement planning site full auto pcp bb gun Retire.53.com - designed to enhance the overall experience of its visitors - those individuals who are participating in a 401K plan boone county ymca burlington ky by Fifth Third Bank.

    Fifth Third updated the website in response to feedback it collected through surveys, focus groups and other interactions with its 401K clients. The redesigned website will provide a more personalized experience offering Fifth Third Bank clients the tools and information they need to help them take control of their retirement.

    "These enhancements are part of our ongoing effort to improve the experience of our 401K participants," said Melissa Hooker, senior vice president and director of Fifth Third Bank's retirement business. "This is much more than a cosmetic redesign. It's a comprehensive renovation that will help empower our clients to prepare for their better tomorrows."

    The new site, which is scheduled to be available in early October, bank of america platinum debit card offers the following enhancements:

    Fifth Third Bancorp is a diversified financial services company headquartered in Cincinnati, Ohio. The Company has $111 billion in assets and operates 15 affiliates with 1,314 full-service Banking Centers, including 103 Bank Mart® locations open seven days a week inside select grocery stores and 2,434 ATMs in Ohio, Kentucky, Indiana, Michigan, Illinois, Florida, Tennessee, West Virginia, Pennsylvania, Missouri, Georgia and North Carolina. Fifth Third operates four main businesses: Commercial Banking, Branch Banking, Consumer Lending, and Investment Advisors. Fifth Third also has a 49% interest in Vantiv, LLC, formerly Fifth Third Processing Solutions, LLC. Fifth Third is among the largest money managers in the Midwest and, as of June 30, 2011, had $276 billion in assets under care, of which it managed $25 billion for individuals, corporations and not-for-profit organizations. Investor information and press comenity ikea credit card login releases can be viewed at www.53.com. Fifth Third's common stock is traded on the NASDAQ® Global Select Market under the symbol "FITB."

    Fifth Third Bank
    Debra DeCourcy, APR, 513-534-4153

    Источник: https://www.marketscreener.com/quote/stock/FIFTH-THIRD-BANCORP-9308/news/5TH-3RD-BANCO-New-Changes-Ahead-for-Retire-53-com-13792390/

    The Eagles made a flurry of roster moves Saturday afternoon in advance of their wild-card playoff game against the Bucs in Tampa on Sunday.

    With Tyree Jackson on Injured Reserve with a torn ACL, veteran tight end Richard Rodgers was signed from the practice squad to the 53-man roster. Rodgers, 29, has spent parts of the last four seasons with the Eagles. He has 147 career receptions for 1,529 yards and 15 touchdowns, including 24-for-345 last year. Rodgers is the Eagles’ most experienced playoff player with 10 career games. He has 13 catches for 138 yards and two TDs in the postseason, all with the Packers. Rodgers has played in three games this year and has two catches for 11 yards.

    The Eagles placed rookie sixth-round defensive tackle Marlon Tuipulotu on the Reserve/COVID-19 list. Tuipuilotu played in five games this year and had five tackles. He played 55 defensive snaps, 26 of them in the meaningless loss to the Cowboys last weekend.

    With Tuipulotu’s roster spot, the Eagles activated undrafted rookie offensive lineman Kayode Awosika from the practice squad. Awoskia, Jackson’s college teammate at Buffalo, made his NFL debut in the Dallas game Sunday and played 43 snaps.

    The Eagles elevated defensive end Cameron Malveaux as a game-day practice squad elevation. Malveaux has played 66 snaps in the last three games. With Josh Sweat’s status up in the air -- he didn’t practice all week because of abdominal pain -- Malveaux becomes the fourth active edge rusher after Derek Barnett, Ryan Kerrigan and Tarron Jackson. Malveaux has previously played with the Browns, Cards, Dolphins, 49ers, Chiefs and Washington.

    The Eagles also elevated wide receiver KeeSean Johnson from the practice squad. Johnson, a former sixth-round pick of the Cards, caught 36 passes for 360 yards and one TD in 18 games for the Cards in 2019 and 2020. Johnson has been on the Eagles’ practice squad all year.

    Источник: how to find best mortgage refinance rates
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