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    aol games help

    Daily games and puzzles to sharpen your skills. AARP has new free games online such as Mahjongg, Sudoku, Crossword Puzzles, Solitaire, Word games and. Quantum Space, the first fully automated play-by-mail game (1989–1991). 1991–2006: Internet age, Time Warner merger. First AOL logo as "America Online. The best brain training apps and games It supports Google, Yahoo, AOL, and iCloud accounts, and it features native push notifications, groups.
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    Neverwinter Nights (AOL)

    This game is unplayable.Unplayable.

    This game is unplayable. While game features will be described on this page, actual gameplay assistance will not be supplied. This game is covered here for historical reference.

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    Box artwork for Neverwinter Nights.
    Designer(s)Don Daglow
    Release date(s)
    Genre(s)RPG
    PlayersMMOG
    For the BioWare game, see Neverwinter Nights.

    Neverwinter Nights was the first MMORPG to display graphics, and ran from 1991 to 1997 on AOL (then called Quantum Computer Services). The genre had previously been pioneered by the all-text Islands of Kesmai series created by Kelton Flinn at Kesmai.

    In addition to being the first graphics-based MMORPG, the game also marked the first appearance of online Clans and Player versus player combat in multiplayer RPGs.

    Neverwinter Nights was followed by a series of progressively more successful graphical MMORPGs, including Shadow of Yserbius (1992–1996), Ultima Online (1997–present) and EverQuest (1999–present). By 2000 the category was well-established and multiple titles began to appear in North America and in Asia.

    NWN is the predecessor to BioWare's 2002 game Neverwinter Nights.

    History[edit]

    Screenshot of Neverwinter Nights on AOL.

    Neverwinter Nights was a co-development of AOL, Stormfront Studios, SSI, and TSR (which was acquired by Wizards of the Coast in 1997).

    Don Daglow and the Stormfront game design team began working with AOL on original online games in 1987, in both text-based and graphical formats. At the time AOL was a Commodore 64-only online service, known as Quantum Computer Services, with just a few thousand subscribers, and was called Quantum Link. Online graphics in the late 1980s were severely restricted by the need to support modem data transfer rates as slow as 300 bits per second (bit/s).

    In 1989 the Stormfront team started working with SSI on Dungeons & Dragons games using the Gold Box engine that had debuted with Pool of Radiance in 1988. Within months they realized that it was technically feasible to combine the Dungeons & Dragons Gold Box engine with the community-focused gameplay of online titles to create an online RPG with graphics. Although the multiplayer graphical flight combat game Air Warrior (also from Kesmai) had been online since 1987 [1], all prior online RPGs had been based on text.

    In a series of meetings in San Francisco and Las Vegas with AOL's Steve Case and Kathi McHugh, TSR's Jim Ward and SSI's Chuck Kroegel, Daglow and programmer Cathryn Mataga convinced the other three partners that the project was indeed possible. Case approved funding for NWN and work began, with the game going live 18 months later in March of 1991.

    Daglow chose Neverwinter as the game's location because of its magical features (a river of warm water that flowed from a snowy forest into a northern sea), and its location near a wide variety of terrain types. The area also was close enough to the settings of the other Gold Box games to allow subplots to intertwine between the online and the disk-based titles.

    Cost and playerbase[edit]

    The game originally cost USD$6.00 per hour to play. Some users bragged about monthly game bills of $500 or more. As the years progressed, Internet connection costs dropped, AOL and NWN membership grew, the servers became faster and the hourly player charge declined. As a result of these upgrades, the capacity of each server grew from 50 players in 1991 to 500 players by 1995.[2] Ultimately the game became a free part of the AOL subscriber service.

    Near the end of its run in 1997 the game had 115,000 players and typically hosted 2,000 adventurers during prime evening hours, a 4000% increase over 1991.[3]

    Expansion and popularity[edit]

    The original Neverwinter Nights was expanded once, in 1992 [4]. At about this time AOL’s subscriber growth started to expand exponentially, as the adoption of e-mail by everyday Americans drove new sign-ups. AOL diverted all its efforts into keeping up with the exploding demand for modem connections and online capacity. All game development at AOL other than NWN was suspended, and the game's player capacity was enhanced through server-side improvements but not through the addition of new playable areas. Nevertheless, the original game remained one of AOL's most active areas until a disagreement arose between AOL and TSR over future rights to the game. Thousands of dedicated NWN players rose in protest, some in national media, but to no avail. [5] The gates of Neverwinter were closed in July 1997. [6]

    Much of the game's popularity was based on the presence of active and creative player guilds, who staged many special gaming events online for their members. It is this committed fan base that BioWare sought when they licensed the rights to Neverwinter Nights from AOL and TSR as the basis for the modern game. [7]

    NWN gained incidental media attention from AOL tech and marketing staff by appearing in the Don't Copy That Floppy campaign by the Software Publishers Association.

    Gameplay[edit]

    Player vs Player combat was very popular but not necessary. Singles and Doubles Ladders contained over one hundred competitors. Many guilds participated in the Great Wars which pitted three quad teams from a guild vs another guild. A quad team would play each quad team from the other guild and the winning guild was the best of 9. The guilds progressed through an NCAA-like tournament to reach the final champion. One of the major drivers for PvP's popularity was the amazingly balanced combat system that provided a chess like turn based combat system which incorporated NPC (non player character) manipulation and a limited number of power spells . There were innumerable strategies based on trying to maximize the effectiveness of when to use the power spells (such as a Globe - protection from spells under level 3, mirror image - which could not be cast if you were globed but when cast created between 1 and 4 duplicate copies of yourself which could shield against any non-area effect spell, or cause critical wounds which would knock between 5-30% of the hitpoints from the enemy if you didn't hit a duplicate copy of the enemy). The iterations of these and many other spells made NWN PvP arguably the most skill-based strategic PvP engine ever created in the online world to this day.

    Differences between versions of Neverwinter Nights[edit]

    There is one known version of that game for MS-DOS:

    OS Version Language
    MS-DOS V2.20 Turbo Pascal 6.0 (exepacked)

    Posthumous re-builds[edit]

    Some fans re-created the Neverwinter Nights Online experience using Forgotten Realms: Unlimited Adventures:

    Almost a decade after the game's run ended at AOL, online sites allow players to experience the original NWN:

    References[edit]

    External links[edit]

    Источник: https://strategywiki.org/wiki/Neverwinter_Nights_(AOL)
    AOL Sign in

    To ensure an effective way of formal communication, most of the people still prefer emailing. This gives them an opportunity to ensure that the flow of communication takes place without any hurdle. For this purpose, most of the users prefer using AOL emailing platform because without having an email account, this flow of communication is not possible. AOL is loved by people a lot because it allows you to enjoy free emailing services on the go.

    Hence, in this article, we shall learn the basic steps to create an AOL account which will be followed by the AOL mail loginprocess. But before that, we shall learn about some advantages of having an AOL account.

    Benefits of having an AOL email login account

    You are entitled to get the following advantages when you use AOL email services.

    (Note: you can use the same login details for AOL games login and AOL desktop gold)

    1. The emailing service is absolutely free on this platform.

    2. You don’t need to create another account for using the AOL app on your mobile.

    3. The platform allows you to have different usernames. You might need to have these usernames in case you wish to use the same account for client emails, supplier's email, and so on.

    4. When it comes to storage, AOL offers you unlimited storage space for incoming as well as outgoing emails.

    5. There is also a spam blocking feature that blocks suspicious emails before it reaches your inbox.

    6. For managing your contacts, you can use the online address book feature.

    To create an AOL account, you need to follow these instructions carefully.

    1. To initiate the process, go to the www.mail.AOL.com website.

    2. After this, click on the register/sign-up link.

    3. On the resulting page, you will see a sign-up form.

    4. Here, you need to enter your fits name and last name.

    5. Next, enter the phone number in the given field.

    6. In the next space, enter your date of birth.

    7. Next up, choose the desired email address/username.

    8. Complete the account verification process and you are done.

    Now, you are all set to send and receive emails.

    Easy steps to log in at www.AOL.com

    To log in to your account, you need to follow the steps given below:

    1. To begin the process, visit https://login.AOL.com/

    2. After this, go to the account login page.

    3. Here, enter the account username/ email address.

    4. Then, provide the password of your account.

    5. Click on the ‘Sign in’ button.

    This is how you do AOL sign in. But sometimes, you may forget the account login credentials. In this situation, you may recover the account without having to do much.

    Easy way to recover your AOL account

    In case you have forgotten your password, then follow the instructions given below:

    1. Initially, you need to go to the AOL mail login site i.e. www.mail.AOL.com/webmail

    2. Here, you need to provide the email address of your account.

    3. After this, click on the “Forgot Password” option.

    4. Here, you can easily create a new password.

    5. Now, complete the identity verification process.

    6. Ensure that you have the access to account recovery option.

    7. Complete some more prompts to recover your account.

    The residents of the USA or UK can use these login credentials for the AOL gold login. To learn more about what you can do with your account, you may navigate to the official website of AOL.

    AOL Mail - Common Question Answers

    How do I log into my AOL email?

    Using the search bar of your device, navigate to the AOL mail login webpage. Here, click on the ‘Login’ link to visit the AOL login page. After this, you need to enter the username of your account and click on the ‘Next’ button. In the end, you just need to provide the password of your account and then finally log in.

    To find the AOL sign-in page, you need to navigate to www.mail.AOL.com. Here, you need to look carefully at the extreme left side of the page. In this corner, the sign-in/Join option will be visible. This option is just below the search option. Click on this option to land to the AOL sign-in page.

    How do I fix an AOL email problem?

    To fix an AOL email problem, you may try using the basic mail version of AOL or reset your web browser’s settings. If that doesn’t work, use the pop-up blocking software or clear your browser’s cache. Disabling the firewall temporarily may also help in this situation.

    Can I have two AOL email accounts?

    In case you wish to have different AOL email accounts, then AOL allows you to have up to seven usernames per master account. Those users who are using a free version of AOL email can have as many email accounts as they want.

    How do I update my AOL account?

    To update the account information of your AOL account, you need to sign in to your account and then go to the ‘Settings and Information’ page. Here, click on the ‘Edit’ option and enter the information you wish to update. Once you are done, click on the ‘Save’ option.

    How do I check my AOL email?

    From your web browser, go to the AOL.com page and click on the ‘mail’ icon. After this, go to the sign-in page and enter your account login details. After signing in successfully, you can check the ‘Inbox’ of your account to get your hands on the new emails.

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    Источник: https://sites.google.com/mailloginn.com/aolmailloginn/home

    Common Provider Settings

    This page provides common settings usable in K-9 for the major e-mail providers:

    AOL Mail

    AOL Mail supports both IMAP and POP. K-9 can use either (IMAP is recommended)

    IMAP

    For a secure connection, check the SSL option for IMAP/POP and TLS for SMTP in your mail program.

    POP

    Gmail (Google Mail)

    Gmail supports IMAP. Note that Google also prefers a more secure authentication protocol called XOAuth 2.0 which is currently not supported by K-9.

    To configure access to Gmail in K-9, just follow the steps below:

    Hotmail / MSN / Outlook Live

    Hotmail supports IMAP, POP3 and Exchange ActiveSync. Unfortunately, we do not yet support Exchange Active Sync in K-9.

    IMAP

    POP3

    To use POP3 first enable it in your e-mail settings:

    • Sign in to your Outlook.com account.
    • Click the Options icon Options icon, and then click More mail settings or Options.
    • Under Managing your account, click Connect devices and apps with POP.
    • Under POP, select Enable.
    • Click Save.

    SMTP

    Web.DE

    Web.DE supports both IMAP and POP3.

    IMAP

    POP3

    Steht für die englische Abkürzung “Post Office Protocol Version 3”. Per POP3 werden E-Mails von einem Server in ein E-Mail-Programm übertragen und gleichzeitig vom jeweiligen Server gelöscht.

    (Steht in einem Programm “SSL” nicht zur Verfügung, genügt es, die Option “Verschlüsselung” zu aktivieren.)

    (Steht in einem Programm “STARTTLS” nicht zur Verfügung, nutzen Sie bitte das Protokoll “TLS”. Existiert auch hierfür keine Option, genügt es, die Option “Verschlüsselung” zu aktivieren.)

    Yahoo

    Yahoo supports IMAP only for fetching e-mail:

    IMAP

    SMTP

    Источник: https://k9mail.app/documentation/accounts/providerSettings.html

    AOL mail login- www.mail.aol.com
    CHAPTER ONE

    AOL.COM
    How Steve Case Beat Bill Gates, Nailed the Netheads, and Made Millions in the War for the Web


    By KARA SWISHER
    Times Business

    Read the Review

    the canary in the coal mine

        The truth is: nobody knows.

        And, because most often they do not know that they do not know, no one will ever tell you that truth.

        Some people don't know because they are too hopeful and sometimes because they are very greedy. Some are profoundly stupid or are a little too smart.

        But in the spanking new world of the Internet, nobody knows because everyone and everything has just been born.

        Which is why Steve Case found himself on May 8, 1997 cruising on the calm waters of Lake Washington in Seattle on a boat carrying him and more than 100 other chief executives toward the 20,000-square-foot, $40 million home of Bill Gates.

        Case was definitely not supposed to be there--if you had paid heed over the years to a variety of learned Wall Street pundits, savvy journalists, pontificating technology consultants, and waspish naysayers in Silicon Valley. And the computer online service, America Online Inc., which he had built into the world's largest, was just one tiny step away from falling right over the precipice.

        The dirge had been endless: AOL was nothing. AOL was history. AOL was dead.

        Yet there Case stood--perhaps the liveliest corporate corpse one might ever meet--chatting with American Airlines head Robert Crandall, kibitzing with a cadre of Microsoft's top executives, and joking with Vice President Al Gore.

        In the near distance, in Bellevue, Case could just make out the outlines of Gates's glass-and-wood palace, still being built on the lakeshore, where an elaborate dinner awaited them. Getting to see the famed technological Xanadu that Gates was constructing for himself was the highlight of a flashy, two-day CEO "technology summit" Microsoft had organized. There had been speeches all day. Now a dinner of spring salmon, fiddlehead fern bisque, and tortes with Rainier huckleberries awaited them.

        As the boat wended its way from its launching point on Lake Union, surrounded by a flotilla of security boats to protect this small ship carrying very powerful people, to the place Case jokingly was calling "Bill's San Simeon" (after William Randolph Hearst's egotistical monument to himself), the man from AOL thought it was all just a little too bizarre.

        He was happy to have been invited, of course, but felt decidedly out of place. He had quipped to Microsoft finance chief Greg Maffei and other executives from the company that he felt like a spy deep in enemy territory. He ribbed them, asking playfully if he should be taking notes on any stray Microsoft secrets he could glean, and sending them off in a bottle over the side of the ship. But inside his head, he wondered seriously: Should he even be here at all, still standing? Had it only been four years ago that Case had been told by Gates that it was probably the end for AOL?

        Gates--whose leadership of Microsoft and ensuing vast wealth had made him into an American business icon on the level of John D. Rockefeller--had been spectacularly wrong.

        After the talks between them in 1993 had led nowhere, Gates had created his own online service as he had promised. But, in two years of trying and after hundreds of millions of dollars were spent, Gates's Microsoft Network had not bested AOL. With AOL now four times as large, it had not even come close.

        No one had--yet.

        This much was true: in the last decade of the twentieth century, an entirely new medium--online communications via the personal computer--had been born. It was being hailed as the next great technological innovation, in the same league as the telephone, the radio, and television.

        Few times in American business history has an entire industry been created from almost nothing and captured the attention and imagination of millions of consumers, setting off a titanic clash for money, power, and dominance among some of America's greatest businesses. But such has been the case with the Internet and the online services industry since its mainstream emergence at the start of the 1990s. And of the many companies vying to create empires in cyberspace, there was now none better known than AOL.

        In much the same way that Coca-Cola had become the name most people associated with sugared soda, the brand of this emerging new medium had turned out to be AOL. Since its founding only ten years before, the company had grown from a dinky computer games service aimed at teenage boys into a huge business with more than $1 billion in revenue. It had become, in the process, the way most Americans reached the Internet. With nearly ten millions subscribers worldwide, its "circulation" was much larger than that of any of the major newspapers in the United States.

        Yet it was also a company in constant danger. Innumerable challenges had given AOL a heart-rending roller coaster ride all along the way, and many observers had long predicted AOL's imminent demise. In 1993, they claimed that AOL was too small to compete with CompuServe and Prodigy (online services backed by big bucks from major U.S. corporations). AOL was too glitchy and simplistic to catch on with consumers, they opined in 1994. AOL was vulnerable to a withering frontal attack from Microsoft, they declared in 1995. AOL was going to really get knocked flat by the growing popularity of the Internet's World Wide Web, they announced in 1996. And finally, in 1997, they could say with absolute assurance, AOL was going to be its own executioner, shooting itself dead with a dizzying series of corporate missteps.

        And there were so many other AOL killers: the telephone companies, with their advantage in all things wired; the media conglomerates, with their abundant content; the scrappier Internet service providers, with their low prices.

        Beginning in the spring of 1996, the punches came hard: a precipitous stock drop that had cut AOL's market value by two-thirds; the increase of an online trend called "churn" that signaled dangerously restless customers; the embarrassing departure, after only four months, of a top executive brought in to discipline AOL's freewheeling culture; another drastic restructuring of the corporate body and business plan; a restating of financial results that wiped out all the profits AOL had ever claimed it made; a shift in pricing that caused subscriptions to surge, but resulted in seriously blocked access for users; and one lawsuit after another over pricing, access, and stock value.

        Case, who had come to personify the company, had been called sleazy, a soap salesman, a liar, a fool.

        But he was still there. Case, in fact, had turned out to be the Rasputin of the Internet, with no one able to deliver the long-expected deathblow. All the nicknames AOL had acquired over the years had the exact same theme: the cockroach of cyberspace, the digital Dracula, the Lazarus of the online world.

        "Someday, the history of cyberspace will be written as a chronicle of the predictions of AOL's demise," Wired Magazine had written once. "From claims that America Online would fail because it wasn't 'open' to charges that it was inherently unreliable, the service has been a canary in the coal mine of cyberspace."

        By the spring of 1997, AOL's stock was up again to double its price during the summer and fall doldrums. Member numbers were moving slowly toward the golden 10 million mark, and the company had reported a small profit--a development that had taken off some of the pressure from Wall Street.

        But, as always, new rumblings were beginning to surface. With a new flat-rate pricing offering, AOL would not be able to attract advertisers who would yield the sustained profits needed to pay for its burgeoning costs. AOL would not be able to grow as fast as it needed to, because new consumers were becoming harder to find. AOL's proprietary design language would hinder its ability to attract much needed popular content that was flocking to the Web. And even this: AOL's new service head, MTV founder Bob Pittman, whom Case had recruited, was going to stage a corporate coup and displace Case at the top.

        AOL was nothing. AOL was history. AOL was dead.

        At the CEO conference that day, Bill Gates had talked of the importance of ensuring the excellence of a corporation's "digital nervous system."

        "The meetings, the paperwork, the way information workers are organized, the way information is stored--it's my thesis that, with the incredible advances in technology, it's now possible to have a dramatically more responsive nervous system," Gates had opined.

        If that was true, if you listened to all the noise, AOL's nervous system was suffering from an acute case of hypertension. But you couldn't tell that from Steve Case, a man whom his employees had taken to calling "The Wall" because of his ability to exude an otherworldly calm and have virtually no reaction to a wide variety of pressures. He was, in fact, a deeply shy man, not given to small talk and schmoozing--unusual traits, given that he was squarely at the forefront of the newest communications revolution. But his nonchalant style had given Case a reputation of aloofness and of haughty arrogance in the online world.

        But in Case's own head, another mantra had been playing for more than a decade, masking out all the cacophony of complaints.

        Over and over again; it said: AOL would be everywhere.

        Someday, somehow, Case dreamed, his service would be in America's dens, living rooms, kitchens, offices, and malls. And the elitists who ran most Internet companies--the doubters of this singular vision, the ones who told him he was going down so many times--they always had been wrong and they would be wrong once again.

        How did Case know all this?

        He didn't.

        Nobody did.

        But as he floated along on that sunny Pacific Northwest evening, the imperturbable Steve Case knew one thing for certain.

        The ride had just begun.

    CHAPTER TWO

    they came from nowhere

    death and birth

        Bill Von Meister's mourners had no idea what Steve Case was talking about.

        Case had come to Great Falls, Virginia, on May 20, 1995, to pay his respects at an informal memorial service for Von Meister, who had died just six months after being diagnosed with a swift and vicious melanoma that had finally managed to bridle his unruly spirit.

        Von Meister's friends and family had invited anyone with a memory of him to speak. There were many memories to choose from because, in his half-century of hard living, Bill Von Meister had cut a capacious and kaleidoscopic swath through the world.

        Some talked of Von Meister's fondness for fast cars, fine wines, pretty women, and good times.

        Some recalled how his jovial personality never seemed to wane even as the cancer sucked the life out of his beefy frame.

        Some recalled his fervent zeal for starting new businesses, and the way his mind percolated with ideas for new technology and communications companies.

        And others could not help but refer to the darker side of Von Meister--the relentless drinking problem that had forced him into a rehab program years earlier and had never really been cured; the nagging restlessness of his life as he jumped from one project to the next; his inability to follow through in both his business and personal life.

        "He was the most human of human beings I ever knew," said Stu Segal, one of his business associates. "His flaws were never disguised--it was all there in full glory for everyone to see."

        The small crowd in the backyard of Von Meister's elaborate home nodded in agreement. That was the Bill they remembered and would probably never forget.

        Then Steve Case began to speak, stating something that few gathered there seemed to know. Without Bill Von Meister, there would have been no America Online.

        America Online? The very idea seemed bizarre to Von Meister's family, who thought that most of Bill's many business forays had ended in utter failure. Wasn't AOL now the world's biggest consumer online service, worth billions of dollars?

        But Bill Von Meister had died broke, with huge debts, including hefty medical bills and burgeoning mortgage demands, and very little to show for his itinerant journey from one hopeful start-up venture to the next.

        Indeed, his obituary that very day in The Washington Post, the local newspaper, had placed his notice fourth--buried on page four of the Metro section--behind death notices for a prominent doctor, a gallery owner, and a church leader.

        "William F. Von Meister, 53, a local communications entrepreneur, who had been founder and chief executive officer of a number of high-tech and consulting firms, died of cancer on May 18th at his home in Great Falls," it read in part.

        But not anywhere was there a mention of AOL.

        And so, Bill Von Meister was passing unnoticed into obscurity, except for the words of those gathered in a large circle in the garden on this sunny Saturday afternoon.

        The idea of it made Marc Seriff sad. He had also come to the service because, like Case, Seriff's life was inexorably changed because of Von Meister. He had brought them both to a company called Control Video Corporation (CVC) in the early 1980s. And CVC was the initial spark--after many iterations, a series of neardeaths, and more close calls than Seriff could count--from which AOL was ignited.

        But Seriff--who had become AOL's chief technologist--hadn't seen Bill for a long time. He lost touch after his mentor was forced out of CVC by its investors, whose fortunes had turned sour. Major market changes were surely to blame, but Von Meister shared the blame for nearly scuttling the whole enterprise with his pie-in-the-sky dreams, profligate spending, and characteristic disregard for the detail work that is the foundation of any long-lasting business.

        Von Meister had moved onto new projects--as usual, optimistic as ever. And, though both Seriff and Case became multimillionaires many times over from the company that had sprung out of the ashes of CVC, Von Meister had never said anything negative about not benefiting from the riches AOL threw off to his proteges in time. Von Meister had always played the start-up game for the sake of the fun, and CVC was just another stop on his trip.

        Seriff had heard that Von Meister was sick several months before, but he thought it was just another obstacle that Bill was likely to overcome with a smile. There would be another idea, another fast car, and another long laugh. So, the swiftness of Bill's demise surprised Seriff.

        While others memorialized Von Meister's effects on their lives, Seriff found himself deeply upset because the service made him realize the depth of gratitude he owed the man. Von Meister had saved him from losing himself inside a big company and had taught him that he didn't have to choose between enjoying what he did for a living and being successful.

        Although Von Meister had left long before AOL grew large, Seriff saw that the path to glory--not just the technical evolution, but the core team that had managed AOL for so many years--led directly from companies started by Von Meister.

        Did anyone assembled here, aside from himself and Steve Case, realize that?

        Not far away, even as the memorial service was taking place, AOL was holding an annual picnic for its 1,800 employees, who were now working for a company with almost three million customers across the United States. And Seriff--who had stopped going to the gatherings because the company had grown so large--knew that few there even knew the name of the person he considered the "spiritual father" of AOL.

        He declared this at the memorial service, echoing Case's sentiments. But Seriff expected that if he were to say Von Meister's name to the average AOL employee now attending the picnic, he would be greeted mostly with blank and uncomprehending stares.

        Indeed, Bill Von Meister was almost like a doppelganger--the ghostly double of all those who were now living and breathing AOL, the invisible spirit who could never be seen.

        This much was certain: it was in a tiny ember of the soul of Bill Von Meister that AOL was born.

    billy's beginnings

        His father, F. W. Von Meister, was the godson of Kaiser Wilhelm II, and his mother, Eleanora Colloredo-Mannsfeld, was a countess. And--in a delicious irony for some, since Bill Von Meister later presided over a lot of business disasters--one of his father's first jobs in the United States was as a representative of the German company that built the ill-fated Hindenburg zeppelin.

        "Billy," the eldest of his family, was born in New York on February 21, 1942. His father became an entrepreneur of sorts; when his job with the zeppelin company literally blew up with the crash of the Hindenburg in the late 1930s, F. W. Von Meister moved from project to project and finally founded a chemicals company.

        The business proved a success and allowed F. W. to raise his growing family in modest wealth in the leafy suburbs of New Jersey. Billy was an indulged child who displayed an early interest in tinkering. In high school, he formulated the name for a company he would continue to operate throughout his life: Creative Associates.

        And Billy seemed to be very creative.

        One Christmas, for example, he devised a complex system of strings and pulleys that would result in the opening of his bedroom door if triggered by the arrival of Santa Claus through the front door.

        Another electronic device, called "Papa's Tea Tutor," sat atop the refrigerator in the Von Meisters' kitchen. A signaling unit placed in F. W. Von Meister's car would set off a red light and a bell as he neared home, giving the household a warning to prepare the tea service in time for the patriarch's arrival.

        In contrast to his father's stiffer European demeanor, Billy was known as the family's Peter Pan--a boy who delighted in toys and gadgets and fun. Early on, he got hooked on racecars and adventure sports. But tragedy came during the early teens of Billy's life, with the death of his mother from breast cancer. "It hit Billy harder than he let on," recalled his sister Nora. "I think sometimes his very upbeat personality was a reaction to the pain--acting like nothing was ever wrong and everything was great--in order to mask a lot of hurt caused by mother's death."

        After high school at Middlesex Academy in Massachusetts and a post-boarding-school stint at a finishing school in Switzerland, where he spent much of his time racing cars and skiing, Von Meister attended Georgetown University in Washington, DC. Once again known for his pranks and party image, he didn't ever finish at Georgetown, though he persuaded nearby American University to enroll him in its master's program for business. He told his younger brother Peter that he was onto big things.

        "I'm going to make a mark," said Billy Von Meister. "Just you watch."

    (C) 1998 Kara Swisher All rights reserved. ISBN: 0-8129-2896-2

    Источник: https://www.nytimes.com/books/first/s/swisher-aol.html

    About 10 years ago, when you had AOL

    Post a Reply

    chobopeonProfileBlogJoined May 2003

    United States7339 Posts

    maybe most people are too young for this here, or maybe most people from it have moved on but i am feeling nostaligic and want to look for people:

    so about 10 years ago, when you all had aol, did anyone ever go an AOL gaming thing - had big sections for psx, 64, etc. big rivalries between the systems.

    the keyword was ANT. it had a big forum community.

    does anyone have any idea what i'm talking about?

    HaemonculusProfileBlogJoined November 2004

    United States6360 Posts

    Oh man, I was using aol way back in the day. I don't think I ever used aol games though. I remember dialing into aol, then playing old school zergling blood though.

    Nostalgia attacks are common: I just recently went out on a mad search to get Command and Conquer 1.

    I admire your commitment to being *very* oily

    brianProfileBlogJoined August 2004

    United States9383 Posts

    no but i remember playing some weird lingo yingo or wingo or something that sounded like that. i was pretty addicted.

    Hot_BidProfileBlogJoined October 2003

    Braavos36187 Posts

    chibi you make it too easy

    @Hot_Bid on Twitter - ESPORTS life since 2010 - http://i.imgur.com/U2psw.png

    small boobs, really tight pussy, and a high pitched little kid..

    I mean sure, some of them are cute, but enough to fuck? -_______-

    errr...what's so good about that anyways...I'll never understand pedophilia -_-;

    Chibi enlighten me with your values.

    Hot_BidProfileBlogJoined October 2003

    Braavos36187 Posts

    QI aren't you like 15, "pedophilia" is just dating within your age bracket for you

    @Hot_Bid on Twitter - ESPORTS life since 2010 - http://i.imgur.com/U2psw.png

    brianProfileBlogJoined August 2004

    United States9383 Posts

    he's turning 18 in a couple of months, if you look in Website feedback. just three months younger than me.
    O SORRY FOR GOING OFF TOPIC

    Best thing I remember about aol was the Warcraft 2 online pay service. Sure did have fun using cheats in-game ;0

    @hot_bid: oh so it's just dating? I thought it was an unlawful offense on some sexual grounds -_-; Forgive my ignorance.

    KaotuProfileBlogJoined October 2004

    United States986 Posts

    YEAH I REMEMBER ANT

    I remember some tank game you go around blowing up the town

    Got it off of ANT it was amazing

    PanoRaMaProfileBlogJoined June 2003

    United States5064 Posts

    I used to play some starship trooper 8-bit looking game where you control some ship and go around kicking ass. Then they made it only available to those who paid extra for the game and I was like wtf?

    That was my first experience with "micro" and at the tender age of 9 i was ruining everyone's shit ez.

    MyxomatosisProfileBlogJoined July 2006

    United States2392 Posts

    when i had aol i used to play microsoft ants on zone.com omfg fucking amazing game. did anyone else play it?

    chobopeonProfileBlogJoined May 2003

    United States7339 Posts

    On September 05 2006 14:02 PanoRaMa wrote:
    I used to play some starship trooper 8-bit looking game where you control some ship and go around kicking ass. Then they made it only available to those who paid extra for the game and I was like wtf?

    That was my first experience with "micro" and at the tender age of 9 i was ruining everyone's shit ez.



    STARSHIP TROOPERS!

    that game was fucking awesome.

    its a shame they started to charge.

    hopsProfileJoined April 2004

    United States100 Posts

    yeah...i remember ant. if you typed in n64 as a keyword, it brought you there. it had some cool things on there

    On September 05 2006 13:53 QuietIdiot wrote:
    small boobs, really tight pussy, and a high pitched little kid..
    .


    that turned me on
    Источник: https://tl.net/forum/general/43607-about-10-years-ago-when-you-had-aol

    Thematic video

    Early AOL Commercial (1995)
    aol games help

    Forum Speak

    The jargon used to describe Internet fora and online discussions such as Blogs. While some concepts overlap with tropes, on TV Tropes we do not usually catalogue this terminology in the form of individual articles but only as a large glossary. For TV Tropes-specific terminology, see TV Tropes Glossary. Some concepts discussed here are also mentioned by Flame Warriors.

    Forum terms with their own pages:


        open/close all folders 
        Banned 
    A user is banned when the authorities of a website or social media platform prohibit them from contributing, usually by software means. This is usually due to breaking the rules or being an unpleasant person to be around, but in some places, users can be banned on a whim, for rules they weren't aware of, or even based on a false accusation. Some moderators just have an itchy trigger finger. Others are paranoid of Sock Puppets and will ban anyone who resembles a particularly nasty user. Still others say it's much easier to deal with problematic users preemptively than to wait until they make a mess and clean up after them. Not everyone who is banned will automatically know why their account was suspended, and many will assume it was someone else's mistake.

    Regardless of whether or not the ban was justified, the best way to handle the situation is usually to step back, look at the rules, look at your behaviour, and then find one of the site's managers and politely ask what you did wrong. Maybe it was a genuine misunderstanding. Maybe your lack of experience unwittingly made you look like a previous rule-breaker. Maybe you can convince them that you understand what you did wrong and you won't do it again. Even though real spammers, trolls, and scoundrels usually protest their innocence, talking it out is still the best way to resolve the problem.

    Indeed, right here on This Very Wiki, if you find yourself banned or suspended, we have a designated place to talk it out with the staff: the Edit Banned thread. First, though, check out What to Do If You Are Suspended.
        Browser Narcotic 
    https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/rsz_3_1454.jpg

    A browser narcotic is a website that uses up hours of your time with little effort. Like This Very Wiki, which is well known for its capacity to ruin your life. Unlike an Archive Binge, which is linear in nature, a browser narcotic allows you to go in any number of directions, often ending up on a Wiki Walk. The defining feature of a browser narcotic is the tab explosion, a browser with Eleventy Zillion tabs open at once.

    The name comes from xkcd, specifically the Alt Text of this comic, which explicitly describes TV Tropes as an example.

    Here are some other offenders aside from TV tropes:

    • Wikipedia
    • 4chan
    • reddit
    • Any porn site. Admit it, you know it to be true.
    • Cracked.com. Brazilians have a humorous blog that's just like Cracked.
    • Dark Roasted Blend
    • DeviantArt
    • Pixiv, thanks to its recommendation feature being a little too good, tends to induce Wiki Walks. Heaven help you if you start to browse for fanart of one of the more popular series, like Touhou Project, Hetalia, Pokémon, Vocaloid, or Inazuma Eleven, each of which will get you over 150,000 hits. Though the effect is lessened somewhat, as a large part of the website is in Japanese.
    • Digg
    • Everything2
    • Facebook
    • Tumblr
    • FanFiction.Net. The good ones at least. and badfic too, arguably. This also applies to most well organized fanfic sites like, say, Archive of Our Own.
    • Fark
    • Oobject
    • Damn Interesting
    • Forums can end up as these if there are enough interesting threads.
    • The Polish site Wyhacz.plis was a news service devoted mainly to various instances of citizens being screwed over by bureaucratic incompetence or corporate dishonesty. It's surprisingly fascinating.
    • The Let's Play Archive: Oh, you've just discovered the Let's Play phenomenon and spent several hours following an LP of your favorite game? No worries, we can recommend LP's from the same genre / author that are sure to interest you. And once you're done with those, we have more recommendations.
    • The Cheezburger Network
    • The SCP Foundation can do this, as some of the most popular articles include experiment logs involving other SCPs. The site is trying to minimize this, however. Just watch your step, because you're walking through a minefield of really terrifying stuff.
    • Snopes
    • StumbleUpon
    • Twitter
    • Orion's Arm, hoooo boooy.
    • Uncyclopedia
    • Yahoo!.com (the main page that features news articles).
    • YouTube
    • AniDB
    • Most estate agent/real estate websites tend to provoke this. If you've come to one looking for property to buy, you'll no doubt be opening plenty of tabs to compare different listings, and if you're not. you're probably opening loads of tabs to dream.
    • Hardcore Gaming 101
    • Everything Is Terrible
    • WeKnowMemes
    • Imgur: That is, of course, if we are to believeaol games help Daily Derp.
    • BuzzFeed, particularly the list pages, and similar clickbait sites
    • Sports fans can have this on Bleacher Report and Page 2 \ Grantland.
    • MapCrunch takes you to a random location on Google StreetView. You can navigate on it as usual, or press a button that takes you to another random location. Now try to stop exploring the world.
    • Not Always Right. The effect is lessened due to only adding 5 or 6 anecdotes a day (easily read in 15 minutes), but increased due to its massive archive and eight sister sites, Not Always Working/Romantic/Related/Learning/Friendly/ Hopeless/Healthy and Legal.
    • The Polish equivalent of Not Always Right, piekielni.pl .
    • Uberfacts, with a Website, twoapps, and severalTwitteraccounts.
    • Any good webcomic with a big enough archive.
    • Fundies Say the Darndest Things i.e. an immense archive of all the insane things fundamentalists have said in this contemporary age. It even has an article on RationalWiki.
    • Most .io Games can easily waste large amounts of one's time due to the ease of joining a game and playing a few rounds. and another.

        The Database Hates You 
    "The database hates you right now. The entry might exist or it might not exist. We would clear up this mystery for you, if we could get to the database. We tried to look it up, but the database puked up an error."

    Sometimes, you make an effort to write something great and put it on the Internet, but when you actually try to post it, something goes wrong. The connection between your computer and the database was disrupted in some way. If you're lucky, the data you sent was just held up and will pop up after everything resolves itself. If you were unlucky, your post was eaten by Data Vampires.

    Importantly, the database is not the same thing as the Data Vampires, although one may feed your post to the other. The best way to avoid losing your beautiful, well-written, unreproducible post is to copy-paste it to a text editor of some sort (something as simple as Notepad or TextEdit will work), so you can just copy-paste it back when everything starts working again. If the database didn't feed your post to the Data Vampires, doing this is a great way to accidentally doublepost.

    On TV Tropes, if the database hates you, you might see the quoted message when you refresh the page.
        Derailing 
    Derailing is when a discussion goes off on a tangent, a subject irrelevant to the main point of the discussion. Sometimes it's done by accident; other times, it's done deliberately by a Troll. Like a train leaving its tracks, it's difficult to get back on track again. That's why forums tend to have strict rules about staying on topic.

    Not every change in topic is a derail; conversations do drift naturally. Consider, for instance, a conversation about pit bulls, in which someone brings up the perception that they're dangerous animals. A shift to a discussion about animal fights in general is natural. A post of a graphic image of a pit bull mating with a Chihuahua is a derail; it's abrupt, not a natural outgrowth of the prior conversation, and only serves to change the subject. However, the stricter forums might consider both instances against the rules, just to ensure that everyone can follow the conversation.

    Trolls will often derail a conversation by attacking someone or something, forcing the other users to defend themselves or their ideas. They like to rely on Misplaced Nationalism, Ad Hominem attacks, Victim-Blaming, and whataboutism, which usually require a response unrelated to the topic at hand. Nazi comparisons are akin to blowing up the railway bridge, dropping the train into the sea, and then pissing on it. Threats are also an effective way to derail a thread, shifting the discussion to dealing with the threat; many forums take a hard line on threats and will issue an immediate ban for them, and if they seem credible they may even contact local law enforcement. A less inflammatory but no less effective way to derail a thread would be to become a Left Fielder.

    Here on this wiki, we deal with derailment by thumping, our method of removing a post. The post is still there, but its content is replaced with a message that the post was thumped. It's usually self-explanatory (and you're free to ask a mod about it in case it's not). Users whose posts are thumped are given a PM about it, and accumulating several thumps can lead to a suspension.

    See also Change the Uncomfortable Subject, which is an attempt to do this in a real life conversation, usually without the sheer disruption of the Internet equivalent.
        Doublepost 
    A doublepost is a comment that's accidentally been added twice in succession. It's usually a result of a software bug; often, a new post is slow to show up due to server lag, so the user thinks it didn't go through and makes it onb italy. Or maybe there's a bug when the user clicks "Add Post" a few times too many. This kind of thing is especially common on Usenet, where the nature of NNTP sometimes causes a substantial lag in the propagation of new posts.

    In some cases, forums will allow users to delete the last post they made, specifically to combat the doublepost. In most others, the common response is to edit the second post to read something along the lines of "doublepost, mods plz delete". Even if it's not deleted, veteran forumgoers can mentally skip over posts like this, and the conversation can continue as normal. At most places, you won't get into trouble for doubleposting, but if you do it too often, you might be mistaken for a Spammer.

    In some cases, doubleposting is done deliberately. For instance, some places don't allow you to edit your post (or may require you to be a prolific user before you can do it), meaning that if you wanted to correct something, you have to post again with your correction. The less savvy forumgoers will also do it just to add something to their previous comment. In other cases, there's a long period of time between the two posts, and the last post is repeated by someone wishing to "bump" the thread to the top of the list. Forums with strict limits on the number of characters or images per post might also see "doubleposting" with a single long comment spread out over multiple posts.
        Doublepost 
    A doublepost is a comment that's accidentally been added twice in succession. It's usually a result of a software bug; often, a new post is slow to show up due to server lag, so the user thinks it didn't go through and makes it again. Or maybe there's a bug when the user clicks "Add Post" a few times too many. This kind of thing is especially common on Usenet, where the nature of NNTP sometimes causes a substantial lag in the propagation of new posts.

    In some cases, forums will allow users to delete the last post they made, specifically to combat the doublepost. In most others, the common response is to edit the second post to read something along the lines of "doublepost, mods plz delete". Even if it's not deleted, veteran forumgoers can mentally skip over posts like this, and the conversation can continue as normal. At most places, you won't get into trouble for doubleposting, but if you do it too often, you might be mistaken for a Spammer.

    In some cases, doubleposting is done deliberately. For instance, some places don't allow you to edit your post (or may require you to be a prolific user before you can do it), meaning that if you wanted to correct something, you have to post again with your correction. The less savvy forumgoers will also do it just to add something to their previous comment. In other cases, there's a long period of time between the two posts, and the last post is repeated by someone wishing to "bump" the thread to the top of the list. Forums with strict limits on the number of characters or images per post might also see "doubleposting" with a single long comment spread out over multiple posts.
        Fannage 
    "You got to love an encyclopedia that has a longer article for the lightsaber than they do for the printing press."

    Fannage is a wiki phenomenon where things relating to pop culture get more attention than mundane topics, even if the more mundane topics are more relevant to real life. It gives generalised wikis like Wikipedia a poor reputation by making their userbase look like a bunch of hopeless nerds who prioritise fiction over reality.

    But this generally isn't considered a bad thing in itself. First, you can always ignore wiki pages that don't interest you. Second, every topic will benefit from having contributors who know the subject extremely well. Third, having fun stuff on the wiki will attract more people and encourage them to work on the more mundane stuff. But the danger occurs when topics with high amounts of Fannage attract a large pool of unskilled editors. These guys have bad habits of obsessive editing, promoting Fanon, poor writing style employing lots of Weasel Words, and an obsession with categorisation — every episode and character needs to have their own page. To the extent that these guys edit the pages on mundane stuff, they take their bad habits with them.

    Wikipedia's extensive fannage is famous, what with its ridiculously detailed television synopses (even the ones with Negative Continuity). Although it's frowned upon there, it's tolerated through the sheer persistence of the editors. People will complain that the $12,000 funding drives seem to be going mostly to rewriting the Star Wars Expanded Universe in encyclopedia form. Fannage also overlaps extensively with what Wikipedia calls Fancruft, where articles for mundane things are injected with the subject's appearances in popular culture; Wikipedia is less tolerant of this and will boot such users to the myriad of other wikis that exist for documenting those things.

    TV Tropes itself mostly runs on fannage, but even here, we get our own version of it with specific works being massively overrepresented compared to others. We've catalogued some of them in Trope Overdosed.
        First Post 
    First!!

    On large platforms, there is often a race to be the first to post a comment in a new thread, article, or video, even if you don't have anything to contribute to the topic at all. The only thing you have to say is that you were the first to say something.

    This has now become an Internet tradition, even though it can get annoying real quickly. Many places discourage it and will just delete such posts on sight, including here at TV Tropes. Fortunately, they're easy to spot, and accordingly easy to zap. Some places even do it automatically, with software.

    Other places have some fun with the phenomenon, such as the Daily Kitten's use of the term "Pounce!" Places like 4chan, never particularly content with "rules" and "moderation", will have long tangents based simply on the response to the contentless first post. Fark is probably the most prolific at having fun with it, employing a word filter to change "first post" to "Boobies" and "first comment" to "Weener", which has the added benefit of causing some ribbing if you actually use the word "boobies". If Fark detects these terms in the actual first post of a given thread, it will also move the timestamp to 12 hours into the future, which for many threads means it will be the last post in the thread.

    Parodied in this video. See also Me Too! and IBTL.
        Garbage Post Kid 
    "Today, I could take a photo of my butt and put it online within five seconds, and while this is objectively a good thing (at least in my case, because I have a sweet butt), it comes with the side effect of making trolls lazier. Most raids now involve flooding sites with gore, porn, or various combinations of both. While you can't argue with the effectiveness of this method, there's zero effort there. Where's the love for the craft? What amusing story did you get out of this experience that you'll tell your grandchildren eventually?"

    The Garbage Post Kid is a kind of Troll who delights in posting offensive and inflammatory text and punctuating them with vomit-inducing pictures and links to Shock Sites. They usually have a personal beef with a specific group member or community and will flood their topics with all the filth the 'Net can offer. If their beef is with a single person, they usually don't care about ruining the day (or constitution) of the many other innocent posters on the board, so long as that one guy knows they can't run or hide.

    Naturally, the GPK is one of the most egregious Internet personalities. They're known for their persistence, posting voluminous amounts of bile and being very hard to shake. Sometimes it can take hours for the mods to clean up the sewage they leave behind; in extreme cases, the entire forum may need to be temporarily shut down.

    The name comes from the Garbage Pail Kids, a 1980s gross-out trading-card parody of the Cabbage Patch Kids toyline that depicted some truly disturbing imagery.
        G.I.F.T. 
    https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/dickwad_0.png
    Just an average day out on the Internet.

    The Greater Internet Fuckwad Theory, or "GIFT"note It kinda should be an Internet Law, like Godwin's Law, but it's called a theory to keep the acronym, is an explanation of why people who are quite "normal" in person become anti-social Internet Jerks when they're online. The "GIFT equation" was first formulated by Penny Arcade and goes like this:


    This phenomenon has been studied academically, and by all accounts, the comic's satirical analysis is spot-on; normal people become more aggressive when they think their behavior carries no real-world social consequences. They think that The Internet makes them anonymous, and they can thus behave as shamelessly and self-servingly as they always wanted, because they'll never have to answer their parents, spouses, teachers, employers, or challengers. (This isn't always true, by the way.)note To elaborate, most Internet users' data and metadata are quite accessible. IP addresses and other identifying information can be found using relatively basic tools. And many active users on social media platforms will happily reveal information about themselves without thinking. All this means that someone who really wants to know the identity of an "anonymous" user can often find it out. It's related to the phenomenon of Bathroom Stall Graffiti; they'd never do it in their own bathroom, but they'll happily do it in a public place when they think no one is looking and they don't have to clean it up. The whole phenomenon was identified by Plato in The Republic, where he recounts the myth of the the Ring of Gyges, one of the original Invisible Jerkass stories.

    Sadly, this leads to a culture of cyberbullying on the Internet. Without any real consequences, people realise they can say anything they want, and as such, they revel in saying the most hurtful and disgusting things, regardless of whether they even believe those things (much less whether they're true or false), probably for the thrill of seeing the damage they can do when people take their words seriously. At least one psychology paper posited that anonymity makes the Internet particularly attractive to narcissists, sociopaths, and sadists, who enjoy seeing others suffer. And since there are a lot of children and teenagers on the Internet, who are particularly vulnerable to cyberbullying, the Internet becomes a playground for these people.

    The rise of social media networks like Facebook and Twitter is forcing some reevaluation of this theory, though. People have been found to be just as obnoxious, rude, bigoted, and abusive while posting under their real identity as they would be if they were anonymous. This means it's not really the anonymity that drives the phenomenon; it's the lack of consequences. Turns out people will rarely get thrown off a social media site for noxious behaviour, nor will most people's teachers or employers scour their social media accounts. The only real threat in this case is the Internet Detective, who will trawl basically anyone's social media history to look for something even slightly objectionable, and the prevalence of GIFT provides them with some positive reinforcement.

    See also Invisible Jerkass, Jerkass Dissonance, Loss of Inhibitions and Mask of Confidence.
        Hit-and-Run Poster 
    The hit-and-run poster is the least dedicated breed of Troll. They'll make a single provocative comment and then leave, never to be seen again. Sometimes they lose interest, sometimes they're content with just knowing someone is likely pissed off, but often they're smugly watching the backlash from the safety of their own computer, refusing to give the other party the satisfaction of a response.

    On wikis, the term refers to someone who makes a single edit to the wiki and never responds to requests for clarification of what they did. The Other Wiki has a whole article on the phenomenon. Here on TV Tropes, though, we call this a Drive-By Updater.
        Hotlink 
    A hotlink is a link to a file, usually an image, which is hosted outside the web service that's requesting it. This contrasts with a link to a file hosted on the same website.

    It's generally considered a bad idea to hotlink things on the Internet. First, it uses up a lot of bandwidth, so it's impolite. Second, and more importantly, the forum has no control over what the host does with it. The image can be deleted or changed to something else. The host may be undergoing performance issues. The host may change its linking policy and disallow the link. The host may cease to exist entirely. There's a whole slew of things that can go wrong.

    Hotlinking still happens all the time, though. Even just linking to a YouTube video counts as a hotlink. And it's a perfect example of the risks of hotlinking, because YouTube videos are prone to being deleted.

    On This Very Wiki, we discourage hotlinking where once can help it and have provided the Media Uploader for Tropers to upload images directly onto the wiki.
        I.B.T.L. 
    Short for "In Before the Lock", a contentless post (like First! or Me Too!) made for two purposes: to predict that the thread will soon be locked, and to inflate one's post count. It's usually seen in a very contentious thread that's either devolved into such bickering that it's unsalvageable, or is relatively new but can't reasonably go anywhere other than unsalvageable bickering.

    It's a relatively useless post for pretty much every purpose. If they're right, the thread is about to be locked anyway, so no one's going to read the comment. If the thread is deleted, "IBTL" doesn't even count for their post tally. And since it's not seen very often, it's not a great way to signal that the thread is headed for lockable territory, as a sizeable number of readers aren't going to get it. It's usually frowned upon in much the same way as "First!", but since most threads that get this treatment are doomed anyway, it's less likely any action will be taken.
        Implonkus 
    Implonkus is that feeling you get when you make an effort to write a good post — correct spelling, correct grammar, actual organisation of thoughts, perhaps even writing a draft and working on it — only for the first response to be festooned with Rouge Angles of Satin, Emoticons, and Leet Lingo. It's quite a letdown to realise that you're the only one who actually cares enough about the topic to make an effort to have an intelligent conversation about it.

    First coined on HBO's forum for The Sopranos, the term is a Portmanteau of "impetus" and "plonk", the latter a Usenet onomatopoeia for the notional sound made when someone is "killfiled", a reference to a Usenet-era ignore list.
        Internet Cold Reader 
    "What proof is there that [Hitler] is an atheist? In Mein Kampf, he actually seems to be a believer."
    "I'm sure you are against classroom prayer and homeschooling as well, just like Hitler."
    — Two editors of Conservapedia have a reasoned exchange of opinions

    The Internet Cold Reader is a particularly annoying online persona who subjects other users to Cold Reading. He'll read a four-sentence post and use it to deduce your life story, psychology, politics, and religious views, and then use that as a basis for their argument. Sometimes they'll invite you to correct them; more often than not, they won't.

    To give a hypothetical example:
    You: I didn't think Twilight was too bad, if you don't think too hard about it.
    Internet Cold Reader: Ah! Obviously, you are a closet misogynist who thinks that every woman needs to find a perfect, godlike, sparkling man to obey absolutely! Also, you probably also have anti-intellectual leanings and feel threatened by the idea that there might be such a thing as quality literature outside of your little bubble.

    Most Internet Cold Readers don't actually sound like armchair psychologists, but the ones who do are hilarious. Some actually do it on purpose.

    Arguing with an Internet Cold Reader is generally believed to be a useless proposition, because anything you may say in your defence is just further proof of your deep-seated insecurities. It's a similar mindset to the Conspiracy Theorist, who thinks that all evidence to the contrary is actually evidence of a cover-up. The fact that most people on the Internet really are insecure, won't ever admit to being wrong, and prefer to dig in their heels over conceding a point means that Internet Cold Readers can rely on a grain of truth from which to spin their bizarre personality profile. But in the end, it's an Ad Hominem form of argument, focusing on the other party's obvious desires and misconceptions over the topic at hand.
        Internet Detective 
    The Internet Detective fancies himself to be the ultimate diviner of truth from lies, a righteous warrior fighting against falsehood on the Internet.

    Accordingly, the Detective will trawl the Internet for any information they can find about an individual from any period of time, looking for something they did wrong, which will then stand for all time and mean they can never be right about anything, ever. These guys can be extremely obsessive, going through old threads, social media profiles, even Real Life public records. They employ heavy use of the Wayback Machine and might even engage in Social Engineering, like posing as someone else to the subject or their friends. Anything they find will be subject to intense examination, taken in the worst possible context (if not removed from its original context outright), and painted in the most embarrassing possible light.

    Accordingly, the Internet Detective's obsessive, stalker-like stance and tendency to jump to conclusions makes it an attractive disguise for a Single-Issue Wonk, who wants so desperately to be right about something that they'll scour their opponent's Internet history looking for anything they can use against them. In the worst cases, someone who wants to defend a false claim will become an Internet Detective looking to make a show of force and convince their opponents to back down, which works more often than it really should.

    The Internet Detective is described on Mike Reed's Flame Warriors Guide as the Archivist.
        Internet Tough Guy 
    https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/internettoughguy_8754.png

    The Internet Tough Guy is someone who will threaten anyone who annoys them online with physical or legal harm. These threats are always empty; Internet Tough Guys couldn't fulfill most of them even if they wanted to. They probably wouldn't even be able to figure out your IP address, much less your real aol games help.

    The most common threat is one of violence, evoking the image of a weakling who fancies himself to be a tough guy but could never convince anyone of that in Real Life. The second most common threat is of a lawsuit, which would be immediately thrown out of court if they ever tried it for real. Those threats often invoke the U.S. Constitution in places where it doesn't apply, especially where the forum isn't even owned by Americans. But there are other, more subtle variants, like the user who claims to be close to the forum moderators and threatens to get their adversary banned, or the user who notices that their opponent is a minor and threatens to call their parents.

    Trollslove dealing with Internet Premier bank com Guys, because they're incredibly easy to provoke into rants, anger, and ineffectual threats — the kind of thing trolls live on.

    See also the Navy Seal Copypasta, an example of an Internet Tough Guy whose threats and claims of military experience are so outlandish that it became a meme.

        Left Fielder 
    https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/350Thump_1978.png
    The Left Fielder is a user who will enter a discussion already under way and start talking about something only vaguely related, or even completely unrelated. When done deliberately, it's a form of derailing a thread, but usually couching the derailment in something not really inflammatory, just horrendously off-topic.

    Imagine, for instance, a thread about whales in which someone asks the question, "Have you ever noticed that a lot of rock stars from The '70s look like Jesus?" Most forum users can't resist the temptation to answer the question. A skilled Left Fielder will throw out something that requires a lot of discussion to aol games help in this case, the users will discuss whether The Beatles look like Jesus and transition to arguing whether the Beatles really even count as a "70s band". Eventually, someone will remind everyone that the thread was originally about "whales in the time of Jesus or something", and the other users will sheepishly go back to talking about whales, but with a few rogue comments sprinkled in about whether the Beatles were better than Led Zeppelin. This is why many forums have strict rules against "off-topic" posts.

    Some Left Fielders are Trolls, but others are Single Issue Wonks who just have to talk about their personal obsession, and still others are Noobs who don't know how forums work. Even seasoned users can't resist throwing something out of left field on occasion, and smart moderators will usually establish a new thread for the topic.

    The term comes chase visa southwest credit card Baseball and is part of more general slang for something strange or unexpected. The exact link to left field (either the area of the field or the player who plays the position) is uncertain, but a commonly-cited origin is from the Chicago Cubs' old stadium at the West Side Grounds, where beyond the left field stands sat Cook County Hospital, a mental institutionnote now it's the University of Illinois Phone number to citibank customer service Center; fans could occasionally hear, coming out of left field, the patients screaming crazy things.

    See also Weird Aside, for when it happens offline.
        Lurker 
    A lurker is someone who reads a forum but doesn't participate. They may simply read the conversations without even signing up, or they might register an account but rarely post, if at all.

    Unlike in Real Life, where a "lurker" would be that creepy guy at the party whom no one remembers inviting and who stands in the corner all night listening to other people's conversations, on the Internet, no one notices a lurker. In fact, lurking is highly encouraged on many corners of the Internet (hence the phrase "Lurk moar"). The idea is that a new user shouldn't just jump in and start posting without a sense of the forum's rules, style, and culture. If you take the time to read the forum and learn how it works, then when you're ready, you can jump in and be less of a Noob.

    However, lurking wasn't always a good thing. The term was coined in The '80s, when the Internet barely existed and was confined to governments and universities. People would connect their Commodore 64s and IBM compatible computers to bulletin board systems via modem. These were often hosted by fellow geeks in their own homes, and usually used a modem connected to a single phone line, meaning only one user could be on at a time — and many a BBS wasn't even online all day long. Thus, a lurker was someone who tied up the phone line without contributing to the community.

    Not all lurkers nowadays are prospective users, either. Sometimes they might lurk but not like what they see and decide to stay out of the conversation. Sometimes it's an old forum and nobody's using it anymore, but someone still wants to see an old conversation. In other cases, the forum may be free to read but charge money to register an account, and lurkers are the ones who don't want to pay for it.

    If walmart money card balance espanol join a forum and admit to being a former lurker, the registered users might be creeped out that someone was reading their conversations, even though they were posted on a publicly viewable forum.

    Not related to the advanced/evolved form of a Zerg Hydralisk, nor the homeless people on Babylon 5, nor the enemy monsters in Jak and Daxter: The Precursor Legacy.
        Mediator 
    A Mediator is the opposite of a Troll — they respond to most arguments online, particularly the ones that don't directly involve them, by posting comments intended to defuse the debate (or at least admonish the other parties for "fighting"). Unfortunately, they're incapable of doing this without a heaping dose of condescension.

    As such, this is very grating to people who were simply having a spirited but reasoned argument. In the worst cases, the Mediator will derail the thread and shift discussion to themselves and how important they are to the forum. This, ironically, usually results in a new petty squabble between the Mediator and the users who are challenging their moral authority. The Mediator is often A Darker Me who wouldn't dare intervene in this way in Natural resources in the north central plains region of texas Life, and the worst cases become an online Well-Intentioned Extremist who commits the Golden Mean Fallacy — either you're totally peaceful, or you're disrupting the forum.

    A Mediator who takes the time to actually be good at their job without the self-aggrandisement will successfully morph into the Shepherd.
        Me Too! 
    "And posting 'Me too!' like some braindead AOLer
    I should do the world a favor and cap you like Ol' Yeller
    You're just about as useless as JPEGs to Helen Keller."

    "Me Too!" is a pointless, contentless post, replying to a previous post just to say that they agree with it.

    Of course, they don't actually have to say the exact phrase "Me too!" Variants include "Seconded," "This," "Damn straight," "+1," and even just "^" (an IRC tradition) to refer to the text above it. In really bad cases, the post will quote the entirety of the text it agrees with.

    Much like "First!", forums hate this and will often delete it. Indeed, it wastes not only time, but also bandwidth; some places which barely handle the traffic they get will ban posts like this just to keep the site up and running.

    However, there are a couple of accepted uses. For instance, some boards will automatically close a thread after a certain number of posts, and participants in a thread nearing that limit who want to break it earlier will agree to flood the thread with meaningless posts to get it locked. Threads involving voting for something will often be filled with posts like this, because all that needs to be said is whether the user agrees or disagrees. On Twitter, the phrase was used as part of the "#MeToo movement", where women who were victims of sexual harassment (or worse) would simply post the hashtag, and the sheer volume of users who did this (particularly high-profile women like actresses — there's a reason for the Horrible Hollywood trope, after all) would draw attention to the scale of the problem.

    "Me too!" was particularly associated with the Eternal September, when AOL subscribers got access to Usenet and flooded it with posts like wells fargo bank branch locations near me (among other Noob behaviour). In the mid-1990s, "AOL!" became a mocking shorthand for "Me too!" on the site.
        Ninja Editor 
    A ninja editor is a person who makes a post, then almost immediately goes back and edits it without comment. Like a Ninja.

    Usually, this is done innocently, like fixing a typo. In those cases, it's usually customary to add something to the end of the post clarifying the situation, like "ninja-edited for typo".

    When it's not done innocently, however, it changes the content of the post. And this leads to mass confusion, as subsequent replies address a post saying one thing, when the post itself says another. It's often done when someone is losing an argument and wants to walk back what they said to make it easier to defend. Because of this, many forums limit the ability to edit posts to a certain period of time after the post was made (typically an hour); this allows for innocent ninja edits, but after that, there will be a marker on the post to show that it has been edited, or perhaps editing may not be permitted at all. Some sites, like GameFAQs, had such trouble with this that they didn't allow editing at all. At other places, it can make for an entertaining forum game, but in that case everyone knows what's about to happen.

    The most malicious form of ninja editing is a Trolling method by which a user asks a question, gets a few responses, and then goes back and edits their original post to make the replies appear super embarrassing or incriminating. For instance, the Troll might get users to innocently respond with a number under 13, then change their question to "How old are you?" — and many forums will ban anyone who admits they're under 13 years old. Or they might post a really inflammatory comment, get a bunch of inflammatory responses, then edit their original comment to something much tamer or even delete it outright, making the other users look like they started the argument by being needlessly aggressive.

    The easiest way to combat malicious ninja editing is to quote a user before responding to them. Users generally can't edit quoted text in someone else's post, and it clearly shows the point to which you're responding. Branching-style forums may also delete any responses to a deleted post to prevent this kind of thing from happening.

    A related phenomenon is the ninja post, where someone takes the time to respond to something, only for someone else to have responded more quickly in the time between the first user reading the thread and submitting their own post. This causes a break in the conversation where one person responds, then the next post appears as if the previous one didn't exist — which is especially confusing if it refers to "the last post" when it really means two posts ago, or it complains that no one's mentioned something when the ninja post did mention it. This is one of the disadvantages of a slow internet connection. Places like 4chan have the variant known as the "Combo Breaker", where a group of posters tries to complete a sequence one post at a time (like spelling a word or posting pieces of an image), only for two users to post the same image in succession because one ninja'd the other, or for a user to post something irrelevant because they weren't paying attention to the "combo" (4chan finds things like this hilarious).

    On TV Tropes, we also have what we call a Serial Tweaker, who makes an edit, realises they missed something, and makes another edit to fix that thing, realises they missed something.
        Orwellian Editor 
    "Rewrites every story, every poem that ever was
    Eliminates incompetence, and those who break the laws."

    An Orwellian Editor is the extremist cousin of the Ninja Editor who goes to great lengths to remove all evidence of something they said or did online, in the hopes that the Internet will forget about it if it's no longer available.

    It's usually done as a response to unexpected criticism — rather than address it, they delete the offending comment and then pretend that it never happened. In some cases, though, it could be much more than a comment — like an entire Fan Fic, perhaps one that was extremely incendiary and racist.

    Orwellian Editors are not limited to hiding their own actions. Just as frequent are cases where a Message Board administrator attempts this on other people, usually when they end up on the losing side of an argument; they'll delete an entire thread and any reference to it to avoid having to face up to it. They'll often ban the most vocal users on the winning side as well, and they'll forbid the remaining users from mentioning the whole affair. This, by the way, is an excellent way to drive away forum users.

    Either way, whether or not the deleted content is truly damaging is irrelevant; in fact, most of the deletions themselves weigh a lot worse on the Orwellian Editor than whatever was posted in the first place. Some Orwellian Editors also find it very difficult to delete everything, in part because they don't always have the ability to do so (although they may try harassing forum administrators to delete stuff on their behalf), and in part because of the Streisand Effect — their zeal to remove something from the Internet is what gets others interested in what exactly it was to begin with.

    Out here on TV Tropes, we've experienced this sort of behaviour from people who've written works they'd like to forget and want us to delete our page on them. That's why we have a policy that The Fic May Be Yours, but the Trope Page Is Ours.

    The term "Orwellian" (in this and other contexts) comes from George Orwell and his novel 1984, in which society is adept at rewriting history to match what the present-day propaganda demands ("We have always been at war with Eastasia.").
        Post Count 
    Post count is the number of posts a forum user has made. It's often displayed in the user's profile, and even next to the user's name on every post.

    For most people, post count is irrelevant — a good comment is a good comment, regardless of the number of comments the user previously made. But some users use a high post count as a proxy for high status and will judge other users — and their contributions — by their post count. There's a nugget of truth to this, in the aol games help that someone who's been on the forum for a long time and is highly respected there will naturally have a high post count. But correlation does not imply causation, and some users will try to manufacture respect by building up a high post count.

    As such, these users will artificially inflate their post counts with contentless posts, along the lines of "First!" and "Me too!", as well as engage in such activities as Thread Hopping and Thread Necromancy. These users are known as "post whores". They're not always bad; sometimes their commitment to contributing actually helps keep the forum stable and active. But others are just obnoxious Spammers. Such users also have a tendency to Suffer Newbies Poorly, because they will naturally think of newbies with low post counts as not worthy of their respect.
        Shepherd 
    The Shepherd is a rare and wells fargo bank branch locations near me online persona who actually helps new members find their way on the forum. They'll take the time to greet newbies, teach dmv written test appointment san jose the ropes, answer questions that might be common knowledge to established users, and get the rest of the forum to treat them fairly.

    Shepherds are incredibly useful to have on an Internet forum, where a noob can barely go five minutes without unwittingly hitting someone's Berserk Button. They don't know which topics always lead to arguments, which users have a Hair-Trigger Temper, or which opinions will draw in the Single-Issue Wonk. Most veteran users — especially those who Suffer Newbies Poorly — will not assume good faith, but instead see the new user as a Troll and react accordingly. Such reactions usually discourage the new user from continuing to contribute. But the Shepherd will protect the newbie from the attacks and help them become a respected member of the forum.

    Shepherds are often held in very high esteem in the Forum Pecking Order, especially if some established users once benefited from the Shepherd's help. Because of this, the Shepherd usually doesn't have to be very forceful in convincing the rest of the forum to shut up. Arguing with or trolling the Shepherd is highly frowned upon, and most other users will rally to their defence. That said, the Shepherd is usually no pushover himself, and is capable of arguing with even the moderators — and winning. And if the newbie betrays the Shepherd's trust, the Shepherd will come down harder on them than even the regulars would have without his intervention.

    Some particularly rabid newbie-haters will accuse the Shepherd of being a White Knight, and in a broad sense their motives are similar. But a genuine Shepherd is a Good Shepherd who really wants to grow the community, whereas the stereotypical White Knight wants to make a big show of "saving" the newbie and is hoping the newbie is a hot girl who'll fall in love with him.
        Suffers Newbies Poorly 
    "Show newbies the ropes! If we see a user we've never walmart order online in store pickup before make some mistakes on the wiki, instead of berating or ignoring the user, we'll hunt them down and hang them. No one was a perfect wiki editor straight off the bat, but if you're dumb enough to get caught, you deserve to die."
    The Urban Dead Wiki's (Satirical) Project Un!Welcome

    A forum user who suffers newbies poorly has no patience for noobs and will berate them for not knowing the ins and outs of the forum, its culture, or its underlying fandom.

    Your average forum has a ton of this type of user, which is why it pays to be a lurker so that one can avoid proving that they're new to the forum in their ignorance. Most users who suffer newbies poorly don't really have a Hair-Trigger Temper and aren't actively looking to scare off the newbies, but their impatience with having to answer obvious questions or cleaning up after a user who doesn't know how things work leads them to blow their top pretty quickly. This user is more of an Insufferable Genius who clearly knows more about the forum and has been there long enough to prove it.

    This type of user is especially common on forums dealing with a specific fandom, where a new user might not know as much about the underlying fandom and asks the sort of questions that a "real fan" would obviously know. It's also prevalent in forums dealing with video games, where users have little patience for newbies who might be struggling with the game and asking for help; they usually tell them to Figure It Out Yourself. Such users might be slightly more justified if it's an online game like an MMORPG or MOBA and they'd be expected to team up with the newbie, and the newbie's poor performance and understanding of the Metagame negatively affects the veteran's enjoyment of the game.

    The particularly odd thing about a user who suffers newbies poorly is that regardless of how impatiently they treated you when you were a newbie, the minute you stop being a newbie and move up a rank in the Forum Pecking Order, they're perfectly okay with you and treat you like an equal. In fact, it's not uncommon for such users to be among the most liked and respected on the board; you just needed to prove your worth. That is, if you ever managed to make it that far and didn't just give up when everyone started snapping at you.

    The effect of users who suffer newbies poorly can be mitigated by the presence of a Shepherd, who can often remind such users that they're being unnecessarily mean.
        Thread Hopping 
    Thread hopping is a term for posting a comment without reading the thread beyond the first or last post. Nine times out of ten, a thread hopper's comment will repeat something that was previously discussed or from which the thread has long since moved on. The term comes from the idea that a person is just going from thread to thread and dropping a comment for its own sake.

    While it would be unreasonable to expect a user to read the entire thread before commenting (at least if it's a particularly long one), it's generally considered good Internet etiquette to at least skim the thread to see if what you wanted to discuss had already been addressed. At least go through the last page or two. What sets a threadhopper apart is that it seems like they just want to inflate their post count and will say the first thing that comes to their mind with respect to the topic.

    The cool thing about thread hopping is that if you spot a compulsive threadhopper, you can comment about them in a thread which they'll never actually read.
        Thread Necromancer 
    https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/MTG-ThreadNecromancer_3198.jpg
    "We have lots of points that we debate to death and beyond. Raise Dead is a 1st level spell on these forums."

    A Thread Necromancer is someone who adds a comment to a thread that hasn't been active for months, if not years. It's dead, but there's nothing stopping you bringing it back to life, like a necromancer. Supply your own Evil Laugh.

    Whether or not this is acceptable practice depends on the forum, and in many cases on the topic. Some places very much frown on it and will automatically lock threads that have been inactive for a certain period of time. First national bank of lilly pa encourage it, because they like to keep all discussion of a single topic in one place and don't like to clog the forum with different threads on the same topic. But more often than not, thread necromancy is not a good idea. Threads die for a reason, after all, and in some cases a thread was actually quite unpleasant and reviving it would just cause more fights. Indeed, one Troll tactic is to deliberately "necro" a Flame War thread that had burned itself out to reignite the argument and grab some popcorn. In other cases, someone will think of the perfect insult days or even weeks after the argument, and unlike in real life, on the Internet you still have the opportunity to throw it out there.

    Other threads, however, have very good reasons to remain dormant for long periods of time, like a Play-by-Post Game where people have taken a break. Indeed, many roleplayers will often ask for a thread necromancer to show up because they want to pick up a game they haven't played lately. Another "positive" necromancy situation is where someone posts a creative work like a Fan Fiction in installments — it can be a while between installments. In that case, though, some writers will also necro the thread to ask for feedback, which can really piss off the other users who saw a new post and had their hopes up that a new installment had just dropped.

    The Internet has long adopted the aphorism "timestamps are your friends" to encourage people who stumble across a thread to pay attention to how old it is, lest they anger the other forumgoers with an unwitting thread necromancy. If you absolutely need to leave a post after a long time, it's considered courteous to acknowledge the long delay.
        Word of Mod 
    Word of Mod is a decision taken by fiat. While the name suggests that it's an order by the forum moderators, in many cases it goes all the way up to the Powers That Be, usually the site owners. Users who don't comply tend to be blocked or restrained. In some cases, the term is used to decry power-tripping forum moderation trying to silence things that reflect poorly on them; Word of Mod can be used to enact the wishes of an Orwellian Editor. In other cases, it's simply a neutral way to playfully refer to moderation decisions.

    In some cases, "Word of Mod" can be used to distinguish comments by moderators acting in their capacity as moderators from comments by moderators acting as forum members like everyone else. This is exactly how it works on the TV Tropes Forum, where our moderators put on their "mod hat" before invoking Word of Mod. Such posts are easily distinguished by their pink background colour.
        YouTube War Expert 
    Police Sergeant Deegan: Ah, this reminds me of Vietnam.
    Father Ted: You were in Vietnam, sergeant?
    Police Sergeant Deegan: No, no, I mean the films!

    The YouTube War Expert is a self-proclaimed expert in all aspects of war studies. They've never actually fought in a war, nor even joined any branch of the military, nor observed any military training regimens or conducted formal study of any historical military campaigns. But they did read a book once. Maybe several!

    Since a lot of Internet discussion revolves around who would win a hypothetical fight between two sides, this type of Internet persona shows up frequently. They're particularly difficult to avoid on YouTube, where it's practically impossible to post a military-related video without several of these guys flooding the comment section. It usually devolves into an argument where the "expert" insists that one side would obviously win because of a myriad of technical and cultural specifications that they alone had considered.

    The YouTube War Expert usually exhibits the following traits:
    • Obsession with the technical details of individual weapons. Real soldiers care far more about the context of a weapon's use; who's using it, what's the target, how many are on each side. The YTWE cares more about how much damage it can do, what conditions it can survive, and how often it will succeed. There are a number of monomaniacs out there who favour one weapon over all others and will extol its superiority in every situation you can think of. They'll rattle off statistics about the weapon at the slightest provocation; if you ever wanted to know about a certain gun's capacity, weight, and rate of fire, they'll tell you before you even have a chance to ask.
    • Misplaced Nationalism and Cultural Posturing. The YTWE looks at a particular nation or ethnic group and re-characterises them as a Proud Warrior Race, uniquely suited to winning any given conflict because of how fearless and disciplined they are. As one might expect, the YTWE often shares said nationality or ethnicity with the group he's extolling. There are also anti-nationalists out there who look at a certain nation or ethnic group and claim that they are almost certain to fall apart whenever the going gets tough. Expect to see an obsession with old unresolved national rivalries, often involving the Cold War.
    • Hilariously masculine language. The YTWE will drop terms like "blitzkrieg", "Alpha strike", "lethality radius", and "maximum overkill". If they know anything about the slang of real-world military branches, they'll use it at every opportunity. They often double as an Internet Tough Guy who will threaten you as if they were at war with you, often saying things like, "How 'bout you say that again when I come to your house and point a [weapon of choice] us public holidays 2020 you?" See also the Navy Seal Copypasta.

    Any debate involving a YouTube War Expert usually devolves into bizarre hypotheticals (e.g. which medieval weapons are better), Culture Clashes, arguments over whether Katanas Are Just Better, and comparisons to losers of major military conflicts. Anyone who actually knows something about military history or conflict will just get drowned out by these idiots.

    These guys nearly universally have no military experience, but in many places (particularly the U.S., which has a lot of Internet users), they can actually purchase weapons for themselves, including firearms. They'll then brag about their weapons, describe them in lavish detail, and fantasise about all the scenarios in which they how to send money with zelle capital one have aol games help use said weapon, none of which will ever materialise because they live in Suburbia. These guys are also often called mall ninjas, after an internet discussion involving someone who behaved like this and claimed to be a mall security guard, who may or may not have been trolling.

    The bottom line is that anyone who's actually been through military training will become well aware of how long it takes to become a real military expert. The YouTube War Expert is so Ignorant of Their Own Ignorance that it becomes blindingly obvious that they've never been close to a military in their lives.

    Alternative Title(s):Thread Hopper, Online Persona, Thread Necromancy, Online Disinhibition Effect, Greater Internet Fuckwad Theory, Tab Explosion, You Tube War Expert, Timestamps Are Your Friends, Thread Necromancer, Thread Hopping, Suffers Newbies Poorly, The Shepherd, Post Count, Orwellian Editor, Ninja Editor, Mistakenly Banned, Mediator, Lurker, Left Fielder, Internet Detective

    Источник: https://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Main/ForumSpeak

    AOL mail login- www.mail.aol.com

    Overview of Games on AOL.com

    Games on AOL.com offers a large selection of free online games, including board games, card games, casino games, puzzles, and more. Follow the steps outlined to experience full-screen gameplay, chat with other players and share your favorite games with friends and family.

    Login / Join

    1. Go to Games on AOL.com.
    2. Click Login / Join.
    3. Sign in to your account.

    To save your achievements and aol games help experience, always sign in using the same account.

    Play games

    After you sign in to Games on AOL.com, sort games by using the category menu bar to select from board games, card games, casino games, puzzles and more, or select from the games you last played. Click on the game to start playing.

    Chat with players

    When you play a game, a chat window opens in the bottom right corner. This allows for communication between players of the same game.
    To chat with others, enter text in the field at the bottom right corner of the game window and click Send.

    Provide feedback

    To report issues with the game or abuse:

    1. Click Play Game on the game you want to report.
    2. In the top right corner, click the Info iconImage of the Info icon..
    3. Click REPORT ISSUE.
    4. Enter your feedback and email address.
    5. Click Post idea.

    Share games to Facebook or Twitter

    To share a game:

    1. Click Play Game on the game you want to share.
    2. On the top right corner of the game page, click the Facebook or Twitter icon.
    3. If prompted, sign in and follow the sharing instructions.

    Did you find this information helpful?

    YesNo

    Источник: https://help.aol.com/articles/games-com-by-aol-faqs

    Common Provider Settings

    This page provides common settings usable in K-9 for the major e-mail providers:

    AOL Mail

    AOL Mail supports both IMAP and POP. K-9 can use either (IMAP is recommended)

    IMAP

    For a secure connection, check the SSL option for IMAP/POP and TLS for SMTP in your mail program.

    POP

    Gmail (Google Mail)

    Gmail supports IMAP. Note that Google also prefers a more secure authentication protocol called XOAuth 2.0 which is currently not supported by K-9.

    To configure access to Gmail in K-9, just follow the steps below:

    Hotmail / MSN / Outlook Live

    Hotmail supports IMAP, POP3 and Exchange ActiveSync. Unfortunately, we do not yet support Exchange Active Sync in K-9.

    IMAP

    POP3

    To use POP3 first enable it in your e-mail settings:

    • Sign in to your Outlook.com account.
    • Click the Options icon Options icon, and then click More mail settings or Options.
    • Under Managing your account, click Connect devices and apps with POP.
    • Under POP, select Enable.
    • Click Save.

    SMTP

    Web.DE

    Web.DE supports both IMAP and POP3.

    IMAP

    POP3

    Steht für die englische Abkürzung “Post Office Protocol Version 3”. Per POP3 werden E-Mails von einem Server in ein E-Mail-Programm übertragen und gleichzeitig vom jeweiligen Server gelöscht.

    (Steht in einem Programm “SSL” nicht zur Verfügung, genügt es, die Option “Verschlüsselung” zu aktivieren.)

    (Steht in einem Programm “STARTTLS” nicht zur Verfügung, nutzen Sie bitte das Protokoll “TLS”. Existiert auch hierfür keine Option, genügt es, die Option “Verschlüsselung” zu aktivieren.)

    Yahoo

    Yahoo supports IMAP only for fetching e-mail:

    IMAP

    SMTP

    Источник: https://k9mail.app/documentation/accounts/providerSettings.html

    Neverwinter Nights (AOL)

    This game is unplayable.Unplayable.

    This game is unplayable. While game features will be described on this page, actual gameplay assistance will not be supplied. This game is covered here for historical reference.

    Subpage icon.pngSplit into subpages
    This article could use a cleanupCleanup this page!

    This article could use a cleanup in order to be more legible and/or presentable. Please help improve this article in any way possible. Remember to follow our editing guidelines when improving existing articles. If you can improve this page, please edit it, or help by discussing possible changes on the talk page.

    If you need help with wiki markup, see the wiki markup page. If you want to try out wiki markup without damaging a page, why not use the sandbox?

    Box artwork for Neverwinter Nights.
    Designer(s)Don Daglow
    Release date(s)
    Genre(s)RPG
    PlayersMMOG
    For the BioWare game, see Neverwinter Nights.

    Neverwinter Nights was the first MMORPG to display graphics, and ran from 1991 to 1997 on AOL (then called Quantum Computer Services). The genre had previously been pioneered by the all-text Islands of Kesmai series created by Kelton Flinn at Kesmai.

    In addition to being the first graphics-based MMORPG, the game also marked the first appearance of online Clans and Player versus player combat in multiplayer RPGs.

    Neverwinter Aol games help was followed by a series of progressively more successful graphical MMORPGs, including Shadow of Yserbius (1992–1996), Ultima Online (1997–present) and EverQuest (1999–present). By 2000 the category was well-established and multiple titles began to appear in North America and in Asia.

    NWN is the predecessor to BioWare's 2002 game Neverwinter Nights.

    History[edit]

    Screenshot of Neverwinter Nights on AOL.

    Neverwinter Nights was a co-development of AOL, Stormfront Studios, SSI, and TSR (which was acquired by Wizards of the Coast in 1997).

    Don Daglow and the Stormfront game design team began working with AOL on original online games in 1987, in both text-based and graphical formats. At the time AOL was a Commodore 64-only online service, known as Quantum Computer Services, with just a few thousand subscribers, and was called Quantum Link. Online graphics in the late 1980s were severely restricted by the need to support modem data transfer rates as slow as 300 bits per second (bit/s).

    In 1989 the Stormfront team started working with SSI on Dungeons & Dragons games using the Gold Box engine that had debuted with Pool of Radiance in 1988. Within months they realized that it was technically feasible to combine the Dungeons & Dragons Gold Box engine with the community-focused gameplay of online titles to create an online RPG with graphics. Although the multiplayer graphical flight combat game Air Warrior (also from Kesmai) had been online since 1987 [1], all prior online RPGs had been based on text.

    In a series of meetings in San Francisco and Las Vegas with AOL's Steve Case and Kathi McHugh, TSR's Jim Ward and SSI's Chuck Kroegel, Daglow and programmer Cathryn Mataga convinced the other three partners that the project was indeed possible. Case approved funding for NWN and work began, with the game going live 18 months later in March of 1991.

    Daglow chose Neverwinter as the game's location because of its magical features (a river of warm water that flowed from a snowy forest into a northern sea), and its location near a wide variety of terrain types. The area also was close enough to the settings of the other Gold Box games to allow subplots to intertwine between the online and the disk-based titles.

    Cost and playerbase[edit]

    The game originally cost USD$6.00 per hour to play. Some users bragged about monthly game bills of $500 or more. As the years progressed, Internet connection costs dropped, AOL and NWN membership grew, the servers became faster and the hourly player charge declined. As a result of these upgrades, the capacity of each server grew from 50 players in 1991 to 500 players by 1995.[2] Ultimately the game became a free part of aol games help AOL subscriber service.

    Near the end of its run in 1997 the game had 115,000 players and typically hosted 2,000 adventurers during prime evening hours, a 4000% increase over 1991.[3]

    Expansion and popularity[edit]

    The original Neverwinter Nights was expanded once, in 1992 [4]. At about this time AOL’s subscriber growth started to expand exponentially, as the adoption of e-mail by everyday Americans drove new sign-ups. AOL diverted all its efforts into keeping up with the exploding demand for modem connections and online capacity. All game development at AOL other than NWN was suspended, and the game's player capacity was enhanced through server-side improvements but not through the addition of new playable areas. Nevertheless, the original game remained one of AOL's most active areas until a disagreement arose between AOL and TSR over future rights to the game. Thousands of dedicated NWN players rose in protest, some in national media, but to no avail. [5] The gates of Neverwinter 53 west 53rd closed in July 1997. [6]

    Much of the game's popularity was based on the presence of active and creative player guilds, who staged many special gaming events online for their members. It is this committed fan base that BioWare sought when they licensed the rights to Neverwinter Nights from AOL and TSR as the basis for the modern game. [7]

    NWN gained incidental media attention from AOL tech and marketing staff by appearing in the Don't Copy That Floppy campaign by the Software Publishers Association.

    Gameplay[edit]

    Player vs Player combat was very popular but not necessary. Singles and Doubles Ladders contained over one hundred competitors. Many guilds participated in the Great Wars which pitted three quad teams from a guild vs another guild. A quad team would play each quad team from the other guild and the winning guild was the best of 9. The guilds progressed through an NCAA-like tournament to reach the final champion. One of the major drivers for PvP's popularity was the amazingly balanced combat system that provided a chess like turn based combat system which incorporated NPC (non player character) manipulation and a limited number of power spells. There were innumerable strategies based on trying to maximize tombstone t shirts doc holliday effectiveness of when to use the power spells (such as a Globe - protection from spells under level 3, mirror image - which could not be cast if you were globed but when cast created between 1 and 4 duplicate copies of yourself which could shield against any non-area effect spell, or cause critical wounds which would knock between 5-30% of the hitpoints from the enemy if you didn't hit a duplicate copy of the enemy). The iterations of these and many other spells made NWN PvP arguably the most skill-based strategic PvP engine ever created in the online world to this day.

    Differences between versions of Neverwinter Nights[edit]

    There is one known version of that game for MS-DOS:

    OS Version Language
    MS-DOS V2.20 Turbo Pascal 6.0 (exepacked)

    Posthumous re-builds[edit]

    Some fans re-created the Neverwinter Nights Online experience using Forgotten Realms: Unlimited Adventures:

    Almost a decade after the game's run ended at AOL, online sites allow players to experience the original NWN:

    References[edit]

    External links[edit]

    Источник: https://strategywiki.org/wiki/Neverwinter_Nights_(AOL)
    Business AOL acquires Bebo social network
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  • ^Tim Armstrong Named Chairman and CEO of AOL. AOL Press Release. Retrieved on April 9, 2012.
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  • ^Pepitone, Julianne (March 10, 2011). "AOL cuts 900 jobs after HuffPo buy". CNN.
  • ^"allthingsd.com". allthingsd.com. September 14, 2011. Retrieved January 30, 2012.
  • ^Dwyer, Kate (March 28, 2016). "How You Can Be in the Music Video for Michelle Obama's Song With Zendaya and Lea Michele". Teen Vogue.
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  • ^AOL acquires mobile photo-sharing app Hipster. VentureBeat. Retrieved on April 9, 2012.
  • ^AOL and Microsoft Announce $1.056 Billion Deal. AOL Press Release. Retrieved on April 9, 2012.
  • ^Thielman, Sam. "Nielsen, AOL Chase Ads With TV-Like Ratings Web giant issues bold guarantees regarding its online GRP's". AdWeek. Retrieved April 16, 2012.
  • ^Vega, Tanzia; Elliott, Stuart (April 26, 2012). "Small Screens, Big Dollars". The New York Times. Retrieved July 1, 2017.
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  • ^ abc"Verizon buys AOL for $4.4bn". BBC. May 12, 2015. Retrieved May 12, 2015.
  • ^MacMillan, Douglas (January 23, 2014). "AOL Buys Software Startup Gravity". WSJ Blogs - Digits. Retrieved January 29, 2016.
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  • Источник: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/AOL

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