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    Home remedies for migraine headache in hindi


    home remedies for migraine headache in hindi

    What to Do for a Toothache · Tooth Pain Relief · How to Relieve Tooth Pain · Home Remedies for Toothache. 1. Apply a cold compress. 2. Take an anti. Hindi translation of the aforesaid book was also brought out by the i.e. taking treatment using acupressure technique as a home remedy side by side. Experts share more about foods that trigger migraines and headaches. RELATED: 12 Natural Ways to Prevent and Treat Headaches.

    Home remedies for migraine headache in hindi -

    Headache due to acidity: Home remedies to cure headache due to acidity

    A headache is one of the most common ailments and most people suffer from a headache at some point or another. The reason for a headache can vary from stress to high blood pressure to allergy to low blood sugar. Another reason for a headache is acidity, which is caused by when excess acid is produced in your stomach. Apart from headache, acidity can cause inflammation and pain in stomach, heartburn and chest pain. For a headache due to acidity, it is not advisable to eat a pain killer as these medicines have side effects. So, if you are searching for an effective home remedy to treat headache due to acidity, your search ends here. (ALSO READ Home remedies for acidity: Try these 11 easy ways for quick relief from acidity).Also Read - Suffering From Blocked Nose During Winters? Try These Home Remedies Today; Watch Video

    1. Eucalyptus oil

    eucalyptusAlso Read - Can Children Improve Their Reading Skills Through Action Video Games? Study Reveals

    Eucalyptus oil will help in reducing the pain and relaxing the strained muscles. It has a calming effect. All you have to do is take a few drops of eucalyptus oil and rub it on your forehead. Leave it for 15 to 20 minutes, you will feel better. Also Read - Is Omicron Really Mild? Doctors Worldwide Are Saying The Otherwise

    2. Basil leaves

    basil

    Basil leaves will not only relieve your headache, it is also a great home remedy for acidity. Eat eight to 12 basil leaves. This will give your quick relief from acidity and the headache due to acidity. It will relax your muscles and has analgesic and calming effects. You can also make a basil tea by boiling three to four leaves in a cup of boiling water. You can add in honey to make it tasty. Sip this tea to get relief from a headache.(ALSO READ Home remedies for hair loss: 6 effective tips to stop hair fall and boost hair growth).

    3. Buttermilk and coriander juice

    buttermilk

    Drink half a glass of buttermilk and one tablespoon of coriander juice to get relief from headache and acidity. It is one of the most effective home remedies for acidity and the headache caused due to acidity.(ALSO READ Home remedies for hair loss: 6 effective tips to stop hair fall and boost hair growth).

    4. Lemon

    lemon

    Lemon will help you to unwind and relax. It will also help in controlling the acid-alkaline balance of the body. Add juice of one large lemon to lukewarm water, mix well and drink it. This will reduce the headache caused by gas in the stomach. You can also apply lemon crust on your forehead to get rid of the headache.(ALSO READ How to lose weight fast: 11 quick and easy ways to lose a lot of weight fast).

    5. Cinnamon

    cinnamon

    Another effective treatment for headache is cinnamon. All you have to do is take some cinnamon sticks, pound them into powder. Now add in few drops of water to make a thick paste. Apply this paste on your forehead. Let it stay there for 30 minutes. After 30 minutes, wash it off with normal water. You will get relief from headache.

    Источник: https://www.india.com/lifestyle/headache-due-to-acidity-home-remedies-to-cure-headache-due-to-acidity-1838346/

    Mirabegron - Brand name: Betmiga

    1. About mirabegron

    Mirabegron is a medicine that eases the symptoms of overactive bladder. It does not treat your condition.

    It helps with symptoms such as:

    • a sudden and urgent need to pee (urinary urgency)
    • needing to pee more often than usual (urinary frequency)
    • wetting yourself if you cannot make it to the loo in time (urinary incontinence)

    Mirabegron works by relaxing the muscles around your bladder. This means your bladder can hold more liquid and reduces your need to pee as often or as urgently.

    This medicine is only available on prescription.

    It comes as slow-release tablets (called "modified release" or "prolonged release"). This means the tablets release mirabegron slowly and evenly throughout the day.

    2. Key facts

    • You'll usually take mirabegron once a day.
    • Common side effects include urine infections and a fast heartbeat.
    • Your doctor may recommend mirabegron if other medicines for overactive bladder have not helped.
    • You will usually take this medicine long-term to help keep your symptoms under control.
    • Mirabegron starts to work within a few hours but it can take several weeks to reach its full effect.

    3. Who can and cannot take mirabegron

    Mirabegron can be taken by adults (aged 18 years and over).

    It is not suitable for everyone. To make sure it's safe for you, tell your doctor or pharmacist before starting mirabegron if you:

    • have had an allergic reaction to mirabegron or any other medicines in the past
    • have liver or kidney problems
    • have high blood pressure
    • are not able to pee or empty your bladder completely (urinary retention)
    • have a blockage in your bladder
    • have a heart problem called QT prolongation
    • are pregnant, trying to get pregnant or breastfeeding

    4. How and when to take mirabegron

    You'll usually take mirabegron once a day. It does not matter what time you take this medicine as long as it is at the same time each day.

    Swallow the tablets whole with a drink of water. Do not chew or crush them.

    You can take mirabegron with or without food.

    How much will I take?

    Mirabegron comes as 25mg and 50mg tablets.

    The usual dose is 50mg, taken once a day.

    If you have a kidney or liver problem, your doctor may recommend a lower dose of 25mg taken once a day.

    What if I forget to take it?

    If you forget to take your medicine, take it as soon as you remember unless the next dose is due in less than 6 hours. In this case skip the missed dose and take your next one at the usual time.

    Do not take a double dose to make up for a missed dose.

    If you forget doses often, it may help to set an alarm to remind you. You could also ask your pharmacist for advice on other ways to help you remember to take your medicine.

    What if I take too much?

    If you take too much mirabegron, it is unlikely to harm you.

    If you take an extra dose by mistake, you might get some of the common side effects, such as increased heart rate, or headache and dizziness.

    Urgent advice: Contact 111 now for advice if:

    You've taken more than your usual dose of mirabegron and:

    • you're having side effects
    • you're worried

    Call 111 or go to 111.nhs.uk

    7. Pregnancy and breastfeeding

    Mirabegron and pregnancy

    Mirabegron is not usually recommended in pregnancy. There's not enough information available to say whether it's safe or not to take this medicine during pregnancy.

    There may be other medicines for treating urinary symptoms that are safer for you.

    If you're pregnant or trying to get pregnant, talk to your doctor about the benefits and possible risks of taking mirabegron.

    Mirabegron and breastfeeding

    There's not a lot of information about the safety of mirabegron when breastfeeding.

    Mirabegron is likely to pass into your breast milk and so it may cause problems for your baby.

    Talk to your doctor, as other medicines for urinary symptoms might be better while you're breastfeeding.

    Non-urgent advice: Tell your doctor if you're:

    • pregnant
    • trying to get pregnant
    • breastfeeding

    8. Cautions with other medicines

    Mirabegron may affect the way other medicines work, and other medicines may affect how mirabegron works.

    Tell your pharmacist or doctor if you're taking:

    • digoxin, a medicine for heart failure or abnormal heart rhythm
    • imipramine or desipramine, medicines for urinary incontinence or nerve pain
    • dabigatran, a blood thinner (anticoagulant)
    • clarithromycin, an antibiotic
    • ketoconazole or itraconazole, medicines used to treat fungal infections
    • ritonavir, a medicine used to treat HIV

    Taking mirabegron with herbal remedies and supplements

    There's very little information about taking mirabegron with herbal remedies and supplements. These remedies are not tested in the same way as medicines.

    Important

    For safety, tell your doctor or pharmacist if you're taking any other medicines, including herbal remedies and supplements.

    9. Common questions about mirabegron

    Источник: https://www.nhs.uk/medicines/mirabegron/

    Everything you need to know about migraine

    We include products we think are useful for our readers. If you buy through links on this page, we may earn a small commission. Here’s our process.

    Migraine is a medical condition that involves severe, recurring headaches and other symptoms.

    A migraine episode is a type of headache. An episode usually occurs in stages and can last for several days. Severe cases can affect a person’s daily life, including their ability to work or study.

    Migraine can affect people in different ways, and the triggers, severity, symptoms, and frequency can vary. Some people have more than one episode each week, while others have them only occasionally.

    In 2018, researchers found that of adults in the United States had experienced a migraine episode or a severe headache within the last 3 months.

    Research from 2015 found that migraine affects just over of females and 9% of males. Episodes often occur in people aged 18–44 years, but they can happen at any time, including during childhood.

    Symptoms

    Symptoms of migraine tend to occur in stages:

    Before the headache: According to research from 2008, of people with migraine experience symptoms that start hours or days before the headache.

    At this stage, a person might experience a “prodrome,” which may involve emotional changes, specifically depression and irritability. A prodrome can also include yawning, dizziness, thirst, frequent urination, and sensitivity to light and sound.

    Sometimes an aura can occur. This involves physical or sensory symptoms, such as flashing lights in the field of vision.

    During the headache: Alongside a mild to severe, throbbing or pulsing headache, symptoms may include nausea, vomiting, neck pain, dizziness, and nasal congestion.

    Resolution: After the headache, tiredness and irritability may last another 2 days. This is sometimes called the “migraine hangover.”

    Other common features of migraine are:

    • head pain that worsens during physical activity or straining
    • an inability to perform regular activities due to the pain
    • increased sensitivity to light and sound that can sometimes be relived by lying quietly in a darkened room

    Other symptoms may include sweating, feeling unusually hot or cold, a stomachache, and diarrhea.

    Find out what else can cause a headache, nausea, and fatigue here.

    Migraine vs. headache

    A migraine episode is different from a typical headache. The experience is different, and they can have different causes.

    Writing down the symptoms and when they occur can help a person and their healthcare professional identify migraine episodes. Keep this journal for at least 8 weeks, and note down:

    • the time that symptoms start
    • possible triggers, such as stress or menstruation
    • the nature of the headache
    • any other symptoms
    • how long the symptoms last
    • any noticeable indicators of migraine, such as an aura
    • any medications and their effects

    Learn more about the differences between migraine and a headache here.

    Causes and triggers

    Experts think that migraine episodes may stem from changes in the brain that affect the:

    • way nerves communicate
    • balance of chemicals
    • blood vessels

    Genetic features may also play a role — having a of migraine is a common risk factor.

    Migraine triggers vary from person to person. They commonly include:

    • hormonal changes, such as those related to menstruation
    • emotional triggers, such as stress, depression, anxiety, and excitement
    • dietary factors, including alcohol, caffeine, chocolate, nuts, cheese, citrus fruits, and foods containing the additives tyramine and monosodium glutamate (MSG)
    • medications, such as sleeping pills, hormone replacement therapy (HRT), and some birth control pills
    • environmental factors, including flickering screens, strong smells, secondhand smoke, loud noises, humidity, stuffy rooms, temperature changes, and bright lights

    Some other possible triggers include:

    • tiredness
    • a lack of sleep
    • shoulder and neck tension
    • poor posture
    • physical overexertion
    • low blood sugar
    • jet lag
    • irregular mealtimes
    • dehydration

    Avoiding triggers, when possible, may help reduce the frequency of migraine episodes.

    What causes headaches? Find out here.

    Research data on race and ethnicity

    Migraine can be a debilitating condition that is underdiagnosed and challenging to treat. This can be seen especially in BIPOC (Black, Indigenous, and People of Color) populations. People of Color are less likely to receive the diagnosis of migraine and the treatment than white people.

    In fact, only have an official migraine diagnosis, compared with 70% of white people in the country. And other research found that Latino people are 50% less likely to receive a formal migraine diagnosis than white people. These disparities can impact treatment and therapies.

    While these figures could lead to the conclusion that white people experience more migraine episodes than other groups, looking at the average prevalence of severe headache or migraine from 2005 to 2012 in the U.S. found that the prevalence rates of episodes across all groups were similar:

    • 17.7% of Native American people
    • 15.5% of white people
    • 14.5% of Hispanic people
    • 14.45% of Black people
    • 9.2% of Asian people

    Furthermore, females in all groups were approximately twice as likely to experience migraine episodes than males.

    Overall, studies that discuss migraine and use racial and ethnic differences for clarity often do not consider contributing factors. Further research is warranted, and this should consider behavioral, environmental, genetic, and socioeconomic factors, as well as access to healthcare.

    Risk factors

    Anyone can develop migraine, and there is a slightly higher risk for people with:

    • depression
    • bipolar disorder
    • fibromyalgia
    • irritable bowel syndrome
    • overactive bladder
    • sleep disorders
    • obsessive-compulsive disorder
    • anxiety

    Is there a link between migraine and COVID-19?

    Treatment

    There is no cure for migraine. However, medications can treat the symptoms when they arise, and people can take steps to reduce the frequency and severity of episodes. But keep in mind that these medications can have side effects.

    Medications

    Pain relief and other types of medication can often help. Taking medication as soon as symptoms start may keep them from becoming severe.

    Some over-the-counter pain relief medications that may benefit people with migraine include:

    Other options include:

    • triptans, such as sumatriptan (Imitrex), to help reverse the brain changes that occur during an episode
    • antiemetics to manage any nausea and vomiting
    • gepants to block a protein involved in inflammation and pain, called calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP)
    • ditans, which interact with 5-HT1F receptors on the sensory nerves and blood vessels

    It is important to avoid overusing medication because overuse can cause a rebound headache. A healthcare professional can help a person decide how much of each medication is safe and effective.

    Find some tips for instant migraine relief here.

    How to prevent migraine episodes

    While it is not always possible to prevent migraine episodes, there are ways to reduce their frequency and severity.

    Medications

    The following prescription drugs may help reduce the number of episodes that a person with severe migraine experiences:

    It may take several weeks to see an improvement.

    The best treatment in children or adolescents may be different from that in adults. A healthcare professional can help recommend the most effective approach.

    Identifying and avoiding triggers

    A migraine episode sometimes happens in response to a trigger. To identify a trigger, a person might keep a diary and record how they felt and what they did, ate, and drank before the symptoms appeared.

    It may be particularly helpful to avoid:

    • low blood sugar
    • physical overexertion
    • stress
    • certain foods, such as chocolate and any that contain tyramine or MSG
    • certain medications, including HRT and some birth control pills
    • bright lights and flickering screens

    The following strategies may help reduce the frequency of migraine episodes:

    If making these changes does not ease the severity and frequency of migraine episodes, a doctor may suggest medication or other options.

    Types

    There are various types of migraine. A major distinguishing factor is whether they involve aura — sensory changes.

    Migraine with aura

    Aura is a disturbance of the senses in the early stages of a migraine episode.

    Aura can involve:

    • having confusing thoughts or experiences
    • seeing strange, sparkling, or flashing lights that are not there
    • seeing zig-zagging lines of light
    • having blind spots or blank patches in the field of vision
    • having a pins and needles sensation in an arm or leg
    • having difficulty speaking
    • having weakness in the shoulders, neck, or limbs
    • seeing things that are not there out of one eye, such as transparent strings of objects
    • not being able to see part of something clearly
    • having part of the field of vision disappear, then reappear

    A visual aura may feel like the aftermath of a very bright camera flash, but the visual changes may last for several minutes or up to 1 hour.

    Anyone experiencing an aura for the first time should contact a healthcare professional to rule out serious neurological problems, such as a stroke or a brain tumor.

    Find out more about migraine aura here.

    Migraine without aura

    More commonly, a person experiences no sensory disturbances before an episode. According to the Migraine Trust, 70–90% of episodes occur without aura.

    Other types

    Some other types of migraine include:

    • Chronic migraine: This involves having an episode on more than 15 days per month.
    • Menstrual migraine: This occurs in a pattern that follows the menstrual cycle.
    • Hemiplegic migraine: This causes temporary weakness on one side of the body, and it is very rare.
    • Abdominal migraine: This involves migraine episodes with irregular function in the gut and abdomen, often with nausea or vomiting. It mainly affects children under 14 years of age.
    • Vestibular migraine: Severe vertigo is a symptom of this type.
    • Basilarmigraine: This rare type is also called “migraine with brainstem aura,” and it can affect neurological functions, such as speech.

    Anyone who may be experiencing any neurological symptoms should get medical attention. And people who need treatment for migraine should consult a healthcare professional.

    Diagnosis

    The International Headache Society recommends the “5, 4, 3, 2, 1” criteria to diagnose migraine without aura. These numbers stand for:

    • having 5 or more episodes, each lasting 4 hours to 3 days
    • having a headache with at least 2 of the following qualities:
      – occurring on one side
      – pulsating
      – causing moderate-to-severe pain aggravated by activity
    • having at least 1 additional symptom, such as:
      – nausea
      – vomiting
      – sensitivity to light
      – sensitivity to sound

    The doctor may recommend imaging or other tests to exclude other causes of the symptoms, such as a tumor, meningitis, or a stroke.

    When to see a doctor

    A person should consult a healthcare professional if they experience:

    • what seems like a first migraine episode
    • worsening or unusual migraine symptoms
    • severe symptoms

    If any of the following occur, seek immediate medical help:

    • an unusually severe headache
    • visual disturbances
    • a loss of sensation
    • difficulty speaking

    These could indicate another condition that may need urgent attention, such as a stroke.

    When is it sensible to worry about a headache?

    Summary

    Migraine is a medical condition that involves a headache and other symptoms. It is not just a bad headache, and it can have a significant impact on daily life, making it difficult to work and do everyday activities.

    Identifying and avoiding triggers can often help reduce the frequency or severity of episodes, though it is not always possible to prevent them.

    Medication and other treatments can help manage migraine symptoms. Anyone who has concerns should contact a healthcare professional.

    Read the article in Spanish.

    Источник: https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/148373

    11 Ways Migraines Are Dangerous for Your Health

    Last Updated: July 24, 2021

    The health effects of chronic migraines can linger well beyond the few hours or days of a single migraine headache. If you have frequent migraines, work with your doctor on a plan to control your pain and prevent these additional medical problems.

    • 1. Your Bowels May Malfunction

      Migraines and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) often go hand in hand. Doctors believe the same changes to the nervous system trigger headaches and problems with digestion. People with IBS often alternate between diarrhea and constipation, and they may also feel bloated or like they always need to go to the bathroom.

    • 2. Your Back Can Ache

      Frequent low back pain strikes somewhere between 13 to 18 times as many people with chronic migraine as those without headaches. With time, pain creates a well-worn path through your nerves and brain, actually changing the structure of your gray matter. As a result, you’re more likely to hurt throughout your body.

    • 3. You Could Have a Stroke

      Strokes occur when blood flow to your brain stops. Migraines double your risk for stroke. The risk appears highest if your migraines are accompanied by aura—visual disturbances such as flashing lights or zig-zag patterns before a headache begins.

    • 4. You Risk Even More Headaches

      Chronic migraines may have you frequently reaching for the medicine cabinet. But if you take pain-relieving drugs more than two or three times a week, you could develop rebound headaches. These occur when your medication wears off more quickly each time and the pain returns stronger than before.

    • 5. Your Vision Shifts

      Some types of migraines result in brief periods of vision loss or changes. Other, less common types cause your eyelids to droop and your pupils to enlarge. They’re accompanied by double vision that may last for weeks after the pain in your head subsides.

    • 6. Your Sleep May Suffer

      Pain from a migraine may make it difficult for you to fall or stay asleep. In addition, chronic migraines have been linked to changes in the way your body transitions between stages of slumber, interrupting your rest. Poor sleep can, in turn, worsen head pain.

    • 7. You Might Lose Your Hearing

      It’s rare but terrifying: Sudden sensorineural hearing loss causes rapid hearing loss over a 72-hour period. This condition appears about twice as frequently in people with chronic migraines. Doctors aren’t sure why, but they suspect damage to tiny blood vessels in the ear may link the two conditions.

    • 8. You Could Have Seizures

      Similar patterns occur in chronic migraines and the seizure disorder epilepsy: Rapidly firing neurons induce sudden attacks of symptoms, followed by periods in which you’re symptom-free. Migraines can trigger seizures in people with epilepsy. And people with both conditions often don’t respond to anti-seizure medications.

    • 9. You Risk Developing Other Types of Chronic Pain

      In one study, one-third of chronic migraine patients had fibromyalgia, a condition characterized by widespread pain, fatigue, and depression. That’s significantly more than the 4% reported in the general population. Any type of chronic pain rewires the way the brain processes pain signals. The constant throbbing of headaches may overexcite your entire body’s pain responses, predisposing you to more extensive aching.

    • 10. Your Blood Pressure May Rise

      Women with migraines appear more likely to develop high blood pressure during pregnancy, and some studies have linked hypertension to chronic migraines in all adults. Malfunctions in your autonomic nervous system, which controls involuntary motions such as your blood pressure and heart rate, may underlie both conditions.

    • 11. Your Mood May Sink

      Depression, anxiety, and bipolar disorder all affect more people with migraines than those without. In part, they result from fearing when the next attack will strike. But scientists increasingly suspect common brain pathways link chronic migraines with psychological conditions.

    11 Ways Migraines Are Dangerous for Your Health

    1. Ohara, T, et al.  Another Case of Lower Back Pain Associated With Migraine: The Importance of Specific Questions. Journal of Child Neurology. May 2013;(28)5:680.
    2. Ligthart, L, et al. Anxiety and Depression Are Associated With Migraine and Pain in General: An Investigation of the Interrelationships. The Journal of Pain. April 2013;(14)4:363-70.
    3. Yoon, M, et al. Chronic migraine and chronic tension-type headache are associated with concomitant low back pain: Results of the German Headache Consortium study. Pain. March 2013;(154)3:484-92.
    4. Increased Risk of Hemorrhagic Stroke in Patients with Migraine: A Population-Based Cohort Study.
    5. Sachdev, A; Marmura, MJ. Metabolic syndrome and migraine. Frontiers in Neurology. 2012;3(161).
    6. Kurth, T. and Diener, H, et al. Migraine and Stroke: Perspectives for Stroke Physicians. Stroke. Dec. 2012; 43(12):3421-6.
    7. Chu, C, et al. Migraine is a risk factor for sudden sensorineural hearing loss: A nationwide population-based study. Cephalalgia. Jan. 2013;33(2):80-6.
    8. Rodriguez-Sainz, A, et al. Migraine, Stroke and Epilepsy: Underlying and Interrelated Causes, Diagnosis and Treatment. Current Treatment Options in Cardiovascular Medicine. Feb. 17, 2013, online ahead of print.
    9. Semiz , M, et al. Prevalence of migraine and co-morbid psychiatric disorders among students of Cumhuriyet University.  Journal of Headache & Pain. April 11, 2013;14(1):34. 
    10. Cady, RK, et al. The Bowel and Migraine: Update on Celiac Disease and Irritable Bowel Syndrome. Current Pain and Headache Reports. June 2012;(16)3:278-86.
    11. Küçüksen, S, et al. The prevalence of fibromyalgia and its relation with headache characteristics in episodic migraine. Clinical Rheumatology. Feb. 27, 2013; online ahead of print.
    12. Migraine fact sheet. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Office on Women's Health, 2011. http://womenshealth.gov/publications/our-publications/fact-sheet/migraine.cfm
    13. Migraine and Common Morbidities. American Headache Society, 2011. http://www.achenet.org/resources/migraine_and_common_morbidities/?print=y
    14. What Is a Stroke? National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute, Feb. 1, 2011. http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/health-topics/topics/stroke/printall-index.html
    15. Headache: Hope Through Research. National Institutes of Health. National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, April 23, 2013. http://www.ninds.nih.gov/disorders/headache/detail_headache.htm
    16. Migraine Information Page. National Institutes of Health. National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, Feb. 11, 2013. http://www.ninds.nih.gov/disorders/migraine/migraine.htm

    Medical Reviewer: William C. Lloyd III, MD, FACS

    Last Review Date: 2021 Jul 24

    View All Your Guide to Preventing Migraines Articles

    THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for informational purposes only. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

    Источник: https://www.healthgrades.com/right-care/migraine-and-headache/11-ways-migraines-are-dangerous-for-your-health

    Migraine Headaches

    What Are Migraines?

    A migraine is a type of headache that recurs (keeps coming back), and also causes other symptoms. The pain is often throbbing and can happen on one or both sides of the head. People with migraines can feel dizzy or sick to their stomachs. They may be sensitive to light, noise, or smells.

    Migraines can be disabling, and teens with migraines often need to skip school, sports, work, or other activities until they feel better.

    Who Gets Migraines?

    If you have migraines, you're not alone. Up to 10% of U.S. teens and young adults get migraines. And after age 12, during and after puberty, migraines affect girls twice as often as guys.

    Experts believe that the likelihood of getting migraines runs in the family. If one of your parents gets migraines, you have a greater chance of having them than someone who doesn't have that family history.

    What Causes Migraines?

    The exact cause of migraines isn't known. Scientists think that they happen because some neurons (nerves in the brain) stop working properly and send the wrong signals. This may affect the nerve system that regulates pain.

    Whatever the cause, experts do agree that different things trigger (set off) migraines in people who have them.

    Common migraine triggers include:

    • stress
    • changes in hormone levels, such as from periods or birth control pill use
    • skipping meals
    • dehydration
    • too much caffeine or withdrawal from caffeine (suddenly having less caffeine than usual)
    • some foods (alcohol, cheese, citrus fruits, pizza, chocolate, ice cream, etc.)
    • sudden changes in sleep patterns
    • smoking
    • weather changes

    What Happens During a Migraine?

    Every migraine begins differently. Sometimes people get a warning that a migraine is on its way. A few hours or even days before the actual headache, people might feel funny or "not right. They might crave different foods, or feel thirsty, irritable, tired, or even full of energy. This is called a "premonition."

    Some people get auras. These are neurological symptoms that start just before the headache and last up to an hour. An aura is different in every person, but it often affects vision. For example, a person might:

    • have blurred vision
    • see spots, colored balls, jagged lines, or bright flashing lights
    • smell a certain odor
    • feel tingling in a part of their face

    Once the headache starts, light, smell, or sound may bother people with migraines or make them feel worse. Sometimes, if they try to continue with their usual routine, they may become nauseated and vomit. Often the pain begins only on one side of the head, but it might eventually affect both sides. Trying to do physical activities can make the pain worse.

    Most migraines last from 30 minutes to several hours; some can last a couple of days.

    How Are Migraines Diagnosed?

    Your doctor will ask a lot of questions to see what might be causing the symptoms, and will examine you, paying particular attention to the neurological exam. He or she may ask you to keep a headache diary to help figure out what triggers your headaches. The information you record will help the doctor figure out the best treatment.

    Sometimes, doctors may order blood tests or imaging tests, such as a CAT scan or MRI of the brain, to rule out medical problems that might cause a person's migraines.

    How Are Migraines Treated?

    Migraine headaches and their triggers can vary a lot between people. Treatment can depend on how severe the headaches are, how often they happen, and what symptoms a person gets with them.

    Usually it helps to lie down in a cool, dark, quiet room. Your doctor may prescribe pain relief medicine or medicines that help with nausea and vomiting. Some people need preventive medicines that are taken every day to reduce the number and severity of the migraines.

    Some doctors teach a technique called biofeedback to their patients with migraines. This helps a person learn to relax and use the brain to gain control over certain body functions (like heart rate and muscle stress) that cause tension and pain. If a migraine begins slowly, some people can use biofeedback to remain calm and stop the attack.

    Adding other non-medicine therapies to the treatment plan, such as acupuncture or herbs, helps some people with migraines. But ask your health care provider about these before trying them. This is especially true of herbal treatments because they can affect how other medicines work.

    Can Migraines Be Prevented?

    You can't prevent every migraine. But learning your triggers and trying to avoid them can help. Take a break from activities that might start a migraine, such as using the computer for a long time. If you know that some foods are triggers, skip them. Some people find that cutting back on caffeine or drinking a lot of water can help prevent migraines.

    Make a plan for all the things you have to do — especially during stressful times like exams — so you don't feel overwhelmed when things pile up. Regular exercise also can reduce stress and make you feel better.

    The more you understand about your headaches, the better prepared you can be to fight them.

    Источник: https://kidshealth.org/en/teens/migraines.html

    15 Natural Ways to Reduce Migraine Symptoms

    Migraine attacks aren’t typical headaches. You may experience pounding pain, nausea, and sensitivity to light and sound. When a migraine attack or episode occurs, you’ll do almost anything to make it go away.

    Natural remedies are drug-free methods of reducing migraine symptoms. These at-home treatments may help prevent the onset of migraine attacks or at least help reduce their severity and duration.

    Keep reading as we take a look at 15 natural remedies that may help you manage migraine symptoms.

    Note that migraine attacks may require treatment with prescription or over-the-counter (OTC) medication. Speak with a doctor about a treatment plan that works for you.

    1. Avoid certain foods

    Diet plays a vital role in preventing migraine attacks. Many foods and beverages may be migraine triggers, such as:

    • foods with nitrates, including hot dogs, deli meats, bacon, and sausage
    • chocolate
    • cheese that contains the naturally occurring compound tyramine, such as blue, feta, cheddar, Parmesan, and Swiss
    • alcohol, especially red wine
    • foods that contain monosodium glutamate (MSG), a flavor enhancer
    • foods that are very cold, such as ice cream or iced drinks
    • processed foods
    • pickled foods
    • beans
    • dried fruits
    • cultured dairy products, such as buttermilk, sour cream, and yogurt

    A small amount of caffeine may ease migraine pain in some people. Caffeine is also in some migraine medications. But too much caffeine may cause a migraine attack. It may also lead to a severe caffeine withdrawal headache.

    To figure out which foods and beverages trigger migraine attacks for you, keep a daily food journal. Record everything you eat and note how you feel afterward.

    2. Apply lavender oil

    Inhaling lavender essential oil may ease migraine pain. Lavender oil may be inhaled directly or diluted with a carrier oil and applied in small amounts to your temples.

    A 2016 randomized controlled study found evidence that 3 months of lavender therapy as a prophylactic therapy, meaning taken before a migraine attack begins, reduced frequency and severity of migraine attacks. However, research is still limited.

    A published in the journal Phytotherapy Research examined the ability of various herbal treatments, including lavender therapy for migraine. The authors found mixed or limited evidence to support the use of butterbur and feverfew for treating migraine but didn’t note that current research supports the use of lavender.

    According to the authors, many studies had a high risk for bias, and more high quality research is needed.

    3. Try acupuncture

    Acupuncture involves injecting very thin needles into certain parts of your skin to stimulate relief from a wide variety of health conditions.

    A found that 20 sessions of manual acupuncture along with usual care was more effective at preventing migraine in people with a history of episodic migraine without aura than sham acupuncture along with usual care. Sham acupuncture is a treatment where the needles are not inserted as deeply.

    A also found moderate evidence that acupuncture may reduce headache symptoms. In the results summary, the authors explain that if people had 6 days of migraine per month before treatment, it would be expected that they would have:

    4. Look for feverfew

    Feverfew is a flowering herb that looks like a daisy. It’s a folk remedy for migraine. It still isn’t well-studied, but there is some evidence that it may be slightly more effective than a placebo for treating migraine.

    In a , which is an update of a previous 2004 study, the authors concluded that larger studies are needed to support the use of feverfew for treating migraine.

    The authors note that one larger study published since the 2004 review found 0.6 fewer migraine days per month in people who took feverfew versus a placebo. They describe previous studies as low quality or providing mixed evidence.

    The published in Phytotherapy Researchalso summarizes the finding on feverfew as “mixed.”

    5. Apply peppermint oil

    The chemical menthol found in peppermint oil may help prevent migraine episodes, although there’s a very limited amount of research.

    A compared the effects of nasal 4 percent lidocaine with 1.5 percent peppermint essential oil and a placebo for managing migraine symptoms.

    The researchers found that 40 percent of people in the lidocaine and peppermint oil groups experienced considerable improvements in their symptoms, compared with only 4.9 percent of people in the placebo group.

    The notes that very little research has examined peppermint leaf, but a limited amount of evidence suggests topical peppermint oil may benefit tension headaches.

    6. Ginger

    Ginger is known to ease nausea caused by many conditions, including migraine. It may have pain-relieving benefits for migraine attacks. According to a , one randomized controlled study found evidence that ginger may have beneficial activity.

    More research is needed to understand the extent and usefulness of ginger for treating migraine-related pain.

    7. Sign up for yoga

    Yoga uses breathing, meditation, and body postures to promote health and well-being. A found yoga may relieve the frequency, duration, and intensity of migraine attacks. It’s thought to improve anxiety, release tension in migraine-trigger areas, and improve vascular health.

    The researchers concluded that yoga could be beneficial as a complementary therapy for treating migraine.

    8. Try biofeedback

    Biofeedback is a relaxation method. It teaches you to control autonomic reactions to stress. During this therapy, electrodes are applied to your skin to monitor physiologic processes that change with stress, such as your heart rate, blood pressure, and muscle tension.

    During a biofeedback session, you work with a therapist to manage stress using changes in your physiologic processes as feedback.

    According to a , there’s good evidence to support the use of mind-body interventions such as biofeedback and cognitive behavioral therapy for treating migraine. These therapies are effectively free of side effects and may make a good alternative for medication for some people.

    10. Book a massage

    Massage may reduce migraine frequency. Migraine is associated with low serotonin in the brain, and massage has been shown to increase serotonin. There’s limited evidence to support the use of massage for migraine relief, but it’s generally safe and has a low risk of side effects.

    11. Try acupressure for migraine-related nausea

    Acupressure is the practice of applying pressure with the fingers and hands to specific points on the body to relieve pain and other symptoms.

    A found evidence that acupuncture may help manage migraine-related nausea during treatment, but that it doesn’t improve pain or quality of life.

    13. Staying hydrated

    According to the American Migraine Foundation, about a third of people with migraine report dehydration as a migraine trigger.

    To prevent dehydration, make sure to drink plenty of water throughout the day, especially when exercising. On hot days, you may need to drink more water than usual.

    14. Try to get a good night’s sleep

    The connection between sleep and migraine still isn’t entirely clear. has found a correlation between high migraine frequency and poor sleep quality. This association is true in people with migraine with and without aura.

    Going to bed at the same time each night, avoiding caffeine late in the day, and avoiding stimulating activities before bed are some of the ways you can improve your sleep.

    15. Butterbur

    Butterbur is a plant that grows throughout Europe, Asia, and North America. Up until , the American Academy of Neurology recommended using it for preventing migraine attacks. In 2015, they stopped their recommendation due to the possibility of liver toxicity.

    The recommends only using pyrrolizidine alkaloid-free butterbur products, as this chemical can damage the liver, lungs, and circulation. Speak with a doctor before taking butterbur.

    Takeaway

    If you have migraine, you know the symptoms can be challenging. You might miss work or not be able to participate in activities you love. But the remedies above may provide some relief.

    It might also be helpful to speak with others who understand exactly what you’re going through. Our free app, Migraine Healthline, connects you with real people who experience migraine. Ask treatment-related questions and seek advice from others who get it. Download the app for iPhone or Android.

    If your migraine attacks or episodes don’t respond to home remedies, it’s important to talk with a doctor. Visit a doctor if your symptoms are severe, frequent, or interfere with your daily life.

    Источник: https://www.healthline.com/health/natural-ways-to-reduce-migraines

    Migraines

    What is a migraine headache?

    A migraine is usually an intense pounding headache that can last for hours or even days. The pounding or pulsing pain usually begins in the forehead, the side of the head, or around the eyes. The headache gradually gets worse. Just about any movement, activity, bright light, or loud noise seems to make it hurt more. Nausea and vomiting are common during a migraine.

    Migraines may happen only once or twice a year, or as often as daily. Women are more likely to have migraines than men.

    There are different types of migraine headaches. The most common types of migraines are classic migraines and common migraines.

    Classic migraines (also called complicated migraines) start with a warning sign called an aura. These types of migraines are sometimes also called “migraines with aura.” The aura often involves changes in the way you see. You may see flashing lights, colors, a pattern of lines, or shadows. You may temporarily lose some of your vision, such as your side vision.

    You may also feel a strange prickly or burning sensation, or have muscle weakness on one side of your body. You may have trouble communicating. You may also feel depressed, irritable, and restless.

    Auras last about 15 to 30 minutes. Auras may occur before or after your head pain. Sometimes the pain and aura overlap, or the pain never occurs. The head pain of classic migraines may occur on one side of your head or on both sides.

    Common migraines don’t start with an aura. For this reason, these types of migraines are also called “migraines without aura.” Common migraines may start more slowly than classic migraines, last longer, and interfere more with daily activities. The pain of common migraines may be on only one side of your head. Most people who have migraines have common migraines (they don’t have an aura).

    Migraines without head pain, sometimes called “silent migraines,” may cause you to feel other migraine symptoms, but not pain. At least not the usual migraine pain around your eyes and temples. This type of migraine may even include an aura phase. You may also feel the same sensitivity to light and sound as with a typical migraine.

    Hemiplegic migraines cause one side of your body to become weak, similar to having a stroke. These symptoms are only temporary. They are a part of the migraine attack. Areas of the body affected by the weakness may include your face, arm, or leg. The weakness may last from an hour to even days. It most often goes away within 24 hours. For this type of migraine, the head pain can come before or after the weakness. This type of migraine is rare.

    Retinal migraines (also called ocular migraines) cause changes in vision that are not related to aura vision changes. For retinal migraines, symptoms involve diminished vision or even blindness in one eye. These symptoms do not last long. They can occur before or after head pain. If you experience this type of migraine, it is important to contact your doctor.

    Icepick headaches are not migraine headaches. They produce a stabbing pain around your eyes and temples. These stabbing pains may occur repeatedly in the same place or jump around to different areas each time. This type of headache can occur at any time and without warning. If you are a person who has migraine headaches, you are more likely to than others to get icepick headaches, too.

    Cluster headaches are not migraine headaches. They are rare headaches that occur in patterns, known as cluster periods. These periods can mean having a headache at the same time every day for a week or even a month. Cluster headaches can be extremely painful. They usually cause pain on one side of your head. This pain can be so severe that it makes your eyelid droop and your nose to get stuffy.

    Cervicogenic headaches are not migraine headaches. They are headaches caused by another illness or physical condition, usually a problem in your neck. Many times, this type of headache can be brought on by a sudden movement of your neck. You might also get a cervicogenic headache after keeping your neck in the same position for too long. The pain can last for hours or days. It may be limited to one side of your head or face.

    What does a migraine feel like?

    The pain of a migraine headache can be intense. It can get in the way of your daily activities. Migraines aren’t the same for all people. Possible symptoms of migraines are listed below. You may have a “premonition” several hours to a day before your headache starts. Premonitions are feelings you get that can signal a migraine is coming. These feelings can include intense energy, fatigue, food cravings, thirst, and mood changes.

    Symptoms of migraines

    Possible symptoms of migraines include:

    • Intense throbbing or dull aching pain on one side of your head or both sides.
    • Pain that worsens with physical activity.
    • Nausea or vomiting.
    • Changes in how you see, including blurred vision or blind spots.
    • Being bothered by light, noise, or odors.
    • Feeling tired and/or confused.
    • Stopped-up nose.
    • Feeling cold or sweaty.
    • Stiff or tender neck.
    • Lightheadedness.
    • Tender scalp.

    What causes migraines?

    Doctors don’t know exactly what causes migraines. It appears that migraine headaches may be caused in part by changes in the level of a body chemical called serotonin. Serotonin plays many roles in the body, and it can have an effect on the blood vessels. When serotonin levels are high, blood vessels constrict (shrink). When serotonin levels fall, the blood vessels dilate (swell). This swelling can cause pain or other problems. Another aspect that is being studied is that migraine headaches go along with a spreading pattern of electrical activity in the brain.

    Some research suggests there could be a heredity factor for migraines, meaning they may run in families. Researchers have identified some genes associated with migraines. They are unsure, though, why these genes seem to impact some people more than others. The American Migraine Foundation reports that if one of your parents has migraines, there is a 50% chance that you will, too. If both of your parents have migraines, your chances jump up to 75%. Ultimately, migraines seem to be caused by a combination of factors: genetic, environmental, and lifestyle.

    Women are more likely to have chronic migraines (migraines that occur 15 days a month or more). This is likely linked to hormones. Hormones fluctuate each month around the time of your period. They can also fluctuate if you are pregnant or going through menopause.

    What are some migraine risk factors and triggers?

    Some things make you more likely to get migraine headaches (these are called “risk factors”). Other things may bring on a migraine (these are called “triggers”).

    Common migraine risk factors include the following:

    • Family history: You are much more likely to have migraines if one or both of your parents had migraines.
    • Sex: Women are more likely than men to have migraines.
    • Age: Most people have their first migraine during adolescence, but migraines can start at any age, usually before age 40.

    Common migraine triggers include the following:

    • Food and drink: Certain food and drink (see list below) may cause migraines. Dehydration and dieting or skipping meals may also trigger migraines.
    • Hormone changes: Women may experience migraines related to their menstrual cycles, to menopause, or to using hormonal birth control or hormone replacement therapy.
    • Stress: Stress may trigger migraines. Stress includes feeling overwhelmed at home or work, but your body can also be stressed if you exercise too much or don’t get enough sleep.
    • Senses: Loud sounds, bright lights (such as flashing lights or sunlight), or strong smells (such as paint fumes or some perfumes) may trigger migraines.
    • Medicines: Certain medicines may trigger migraines. If you think your migraines might be related to your medicine, talk to your doctor. Your doctor may be able to prescribe a different medicine.
    • Illness: Infections, such as the cold or the flu, may trigger migraines, especially in children.

    Foods that may trigger migraines:

    • aged, canned, cured, or processed meat (including bologna, game, ham, herring, hot dogs, pepperoni, and sausage)
    • aged cheese
    • alcoholic beverages (especially red wine)
    • aspartame
    • avocados
    • beans (including pole, broad, lima, Italian, navy, pinto, and garbanzo)
    • brewer’s yeast (including fresh yeast coffee cake, donuts, and sourdough bread)
    • caffeine (in excess)
    • canned soup or bouillon cubes
    • chocolate, cocoa, and carob
    • cultured dairy products (such as buttermilk and sour cream)
    • figs
    • lentils
    • meat tenderizer
    • monosodium glutamate (MSG)
    • nuts and peanut butter
    • onions (except small amounts for flavoring)
    • papaya
    • passion fruit
    • pea pods
    • pickled, preserved or marinated foods (such as olives and pickles, and some snack foods)
    • raisins
    • red plums
    • sauerkraut
    • seasoned salt
    • snow peas
    • soy sauce

    How are migraines diagnosed?

    Your doctor can diagnose migraines by the symptoms you describe. If the diagnosis is not clear, your doctor will perform a physical exam. Your doctor might want to do blood tests or imaging tests, such as an MRI or CAT scan of the brain. These tests can help ensure there are no other causes for the headache. You may also be asked to keep a headache journal. This can help your doctor identify the things that might cause your migraines.

    Doctors Notes banner
    Rx and pen

    If headache pain is getting in the way of your daily activities, it’s time to see your family doctor.  Read More

    by Dr. Jennifer Hanna

    Can migraines be prevented or avoided?

    Medicine to prevent migraines may be helpful if your headaches happen more than 2 times a month. You may want to consider this medicine if your headaches make it hard for you to work and function. These medicines are taken every day, whether you have a headache or not.

    Preventive medications for migraines can include prescription drugs often used to treat other ailments. Anti-seizure medicines, antidepressants, medicines to lower blood pressure, and even Botox injections are some of the preventive medications your doctor may prescribe. Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) inhibitors can also help prevent migraines. They do so by blocking a gene-related peptide in your sensory nerves. This peptide is known to increase during a migraine attack, so blocking it can help prevent migraines.

    There are also a number of non-medical treatments designed to help minimize migraine pain and frequency. One is an electrical stimulation device, which has been approved by the FDA. It is a headband that you wear once a day for 20 minutes to stimulate the nerve linked to migraines. Another non-medical treatment is counseling aimed at helping you feel in more control of your migraines. This counseling works best when paired with medical prevention of migraines, as well.

    What else can I do to prevent migraines?

    While there are no sure ways to keep from having migraine headaches, here are some things that may help:

    Eat regularly and do not skip meals.

    • Keep a regular sleep schedule.
    • Exercise regularly. Aerobic exercise can help reduce tension as well as keep your weight in check. Obesity can contribute to migraines.
    • Keep a migraine journal to help you learn what triggers your migraines and what treatments are most helpful.

    Migraine treatment

    There are 2 types of medicines for migraine treatments. One type, called “abortive,” focuses on stopping the headache from becoming severe and relieving the headache pain. You should start this type of treatment as soon as you think you’re getting a migraine. The other type, called “prophylactic or preventive” includes medicines that are taken every day to reduce how often headaches occur (outlined in the section above).

    Talk to your doctor about which of these two types of medicine is best for you. Some people use both types. Nonprescription and prescription medicines that are used often or in large doses may cause other problems.

    What medicines help relieve migraine pain?

    For mild to moderate migraines, over-the-counter medicines that may help relieve migraine pain include:

    • aspirin
    • acetaminophen (one brand name: Tylenol)
    • an acetaminophen, aspirin, and caffeine combination (one brand name: Excedrin Migraine)
    • ibuprofen (one brand name: Motrin)
    • naproxen (brand name: Aleve)
    • ketoprofen (brand name: Orudis KT)

    People who have more severe migraines may need to try “abortive” prescription medicines. A medicine called ergotamine can be effective alone or combined with other medicines. Dihydroergotamine is related to ergotamine and can be helpful. Other prescription medicines for migraines include sumatriptan, zolmitriptan, naratriptan, rizatriptan, almotriptan, eletriptan, and frovatriptan.

    If the pain won’t go away, stronger pain medicine may be needed, such as a narcotic, or medicines that contain a barbiturate (sleep-inducing medicine). These medicines can be habit-forming and should be used cautiously. Your doctor may prescribe these only if they are needed and only for a short period of time.

    What else can I do?

    To help manage your migraine pain, try the following:

    • Lie down in a dark, quiet room.
    • Put a cold compress or cloth over your forehead or behind your neck.
    • Massage your scalp using a lot of pressure.
    • Put pressure on your temples.
    • Have some caffeine.

    Living with migraines

    Migraines can come on quickly, many times without warning. They can ruin your day—or even several days at a time. They can make you miss work, miss important events, miss out on fun. If you have recurring migraines, you probably feel like you don’t have total control of your life.

    Work with your doctor to take back control. Keep a migraine journal. Document when you get migraines and what you were doing and eating. Keep a record of what the weather was like and if you were exposed to unusual smells or environments. Knowing your triggers can help you prevent migraines. You doctor also may prescribe different medicines or combinations of medicines. Doing this helps sort out which will be most effective for preventing migraines or stopping them when they start.

    Discussion on migraines with Dr. Duren Michael Ready and Nick Haines

    Talking about migraine symptoms, prevention strategies, and treatment options.

    Questions to ask your doctor

    • How can I prevent a migraine? Are there lifestyle habits I can change?
    • What about medicine? Can migraines be cured?
    • What are some possible side effects of migraine medicine?
    • What should I be writing in my migraine journal?
    • Will my child grow out of having migraines?

     

    Funding and support for this material have been provided by The Allergan Foundation.

    Family Doctor Logo

    Copyright © American Academy of Family Physicians

    This information provides a general overview and may not apply to everyone. Talk to your family doctor to find out if this information applies to you and to get more information on this subject.

    Источник: https://familydoctor.org/condition/migraines/
    home remedies for migraine headache in hindi

    Yoga for Migraine and
    Headache Relief

    Migraine is a neurological disorder that causes recurring headaches ranging from moderate to high intensity. Typically, it affects only one-half of the head and can last from 2 hours to up amazon is reviewing your seller account more than 2 days. When under a migraine attack, the sufferer may become extremely sensitive towards light or noise. Other common symptoms include vomiting, nausea, and pain aggravation due to physical activity.

    How do you treat migraine?

    If you have been suffering from head-splitting ache for years or have recently been diagnosed with migraine, there are ways other than medication to help overcome your pain. Arterial surgery, muscle surgery, Occipital nerve stimulation, Botox, beta-blockers, and antidepressants are a few of the various preventive methods available to fight migraine attacks.

    But beware as not all of these methods come home remedies for migraine headache in hindi side-effects. Opting for some of these methods may increase the risk of hypotension, heart attacks, insomnia, and nausea to name a few.

    So, is there a natural way to fight against migraine without hurting the body in the process?

    Luckily, yes. The answer is North carolina central university public relations. Below are the easy to practice yoga poses for migraine. Let us know them one by one.

    Whether it's dealing with blood pressure, hair fall, or getting a glowing skin, the processes taught in the Art of Living Meditation and Breath Workshop helps it all. But wait, there's so much more. Enjoy optimal health and inner freedom.

    8 Yoga Asanas for Migraine & Headache Relief

    Yoga is an ancient technique that promotes holistic living through a combination of postures and breathing techniques. Yoga is a side-effect-free method to fight migraines. Practicing these simple yoga postures for a few minutes every day will help prepare you better for the next migraine attack:

    1. Hastapadasana (Standing Forward Bend)
    2. Setu Bandhasana (Bridge Pose)
    3. Shishuasana (Child Pose)
    4. Marjariasana (Cat Stretch)
    5. Paschimottanasana (Two-legged Forward Bend)
    6. Adho Mukha Svanasana (Downward Facing Dog Pose)
    7. Padmasana (Lotus Pose)
    8. Shavasana (Corpse Pose)

    The Corpse Pose rejuvenates the body by bringing it into a deep state of meditative rest. You can end the yoga routine by lying down in this pose for a couple of minutes.

    Migraine attacks cause unbearable pain and can hamper one's personal as well as professional life. Explaining your situation to family, friends, and colleagues will encourage moral and emotional support from them. It will also help them have an open-minded view of your situation.

    Yoga is a means to make your resistance against migraine better and should not be used as an alternative to medication. It’s recommended to continue bank of america customer service telephone number medication until your doctor advises otherwise.

    Practicing these simple yoga postures will lessen the impact of a migraine attack and may eventually stop them permanently. So, roll out the yoga mat, repose for some time every day, and shut migraine out of your life for good.

    Practicing Yoga helps develop the body and mind, yet is not a substitute for medicine. It is essential to learn and practice yoga under the supervision of a trained Yoga teacher. In case of any medical condition, practice yoga only after consulting your doctor and a Sri Sri Yoga teacher.

    FAQs on Yoga for Migraine and Headache Relief

    Источник: https://www.artofliving.org/in-en/yoga/health-and-wellness/yoga-for-migraine

    Migraine Headaches

    What Are Migraines?

    A migraine is a type of headache that recurs (keeps coming back), and also causes other symptoms. The pain is often throbbing and can happen on one or both sides of the head. People with migraines can feel dizzy or sick to their stomachs. They may be sensitive to light, noise, or smells.

    Migraines can be disabling, and teens with migraines often need to skip school, sports, work, or other activities until they feel better.

    Who Gets Migraines?

    If you have migraines, you're not alone. Up to 10% of U.S. teens and young adults get migraines. And after age 12, during and after puberty, migraines affect girls twice as often as guys.

    Experts believe that the likelihood of getting migraines runs in the family. If one of your parents gets migraines, you have a greater chance of having them than someone who doesn't have that family history.

    What Causes Migraines?

    The exact cause of migraines isn't known. Scientists think that they happen because some neurons (nerves in the brain) stop working properly and send the wrong signals. This may affect the nerve system that regulates pain.

    Whatever the cause, experts do agree that different things trigger (set off) migraines in people who have them.

    Common migraine triggers include:

    • stress
    • changes in hormone levels, such as from periods or birth control pill use
    • skipping meals
    • dehydration
    • too much caffeine or withdrawal from caffeine (suddenly having less caffeine than usual)
    • some foods (alcohol, cheese, citrus fruits, pizza, chocolate, ice cream, etc.)
    • sudden changes in sleep patterns
    • smoking
    • weather changes

    What Happens During a Migraine?

    Every migraine begins differently. Sometimes people get a warning that a migraine is on its way. A few hours or even days before the actual headache, people might feel funny or "not right. They might crave different foods, or feel thirsty, irritable, tired, or even full of energy. This is called a "premonition."

    Some people get auras. These are neurological symptoms that start just before the headache and last up to an hour. An aura is different in every person, but it often affects vision. For example, a person might:

    • have blurred vision
    • see spots, colored balls, jagged lines, or bright flashing lights
    • smell a certain odor
    • feel tingling in a part of their face

    Once the headache starts, light, smell, or sound may bother people with migraines or make them feel worse. Sometimes, if they try to continue with their usual routine, they may become nauseated and vomit. Often the pain begins only on one side of the head, but it might eventually affect both sides. Trying to do physical activities can make the pain worse.

    Most migraines last from 30 minutes to several hours; some can last a couple of days.

    How Are Migraines Diagnosed?

    Your doctor will ask a lot of questions to see what might be causing the symptoms, and will examine you, paying particular attention to the neurological exam. He or she may ask you to keep a headache diary to help figure out what triggers your headaches. The information you record will help the doctor figure out the best treatment.

    Sometimes, doctors may order blood tests or imaging tests, such as a CAT scan or MRI of the brain, to rule out medical problems that might cause a person's migraines.

    How Are Migraines Treated?

    Migraine headaches and their triggers can vary a lot between people. Treatment can depend on how severe the headaches are, how often they happen, and what symptoms a person gets with them.

    Usually it helps to lie down in a cool, dark, quiet room. Your doctor may prescribe pain relief medicine or medicines that help with nausea and vomiting. Some people need preventive medicines that are taken every day to reduce the number and severity of the migraines.

    Some doctors teach a technique called biofeedback to their patients with migraines. This helps a person learn to relax and use the brain to gain control over certain body functions (like heart rate and muscle stress) that cause tension and pain. If a migraine begins slowly, some people can use biofeedback to remain calm and stop the attack.

    Adding other non-medicine therapies to the treatment plan, such as acupuncture or herbs, helps some people with migraines. But ask your health care provider about these before trying them. This is especially true of herbal treatments because they can affect how other medicines work.

    Can Migraines Be Prevented?

    You can't prevent every migraine. But learning your triggers and trying to avoid them can help. Take a break from activities that might start a migraine, such as using the computer for a long time. If you know that some foods are triggers, skip them. Some people find that cutting back on caffeine or drinking a lot of water can help prevent migraines.

    Make a plan for all the things you have to do — especially during stressful times like exams — so you don't feel overwhelmed when things pile up. Regular exercise also can reduce stress and make you feel better.

    The more you understand about your headaches, the better prepared you can be to fight them.

    Источник: https://kidshealth.org/en/teens/migraines.html

    11 Ways Migraines Are Dangerous for Your Health

    Last Updated: July 24, 2021

    The health effects of chronic migraines can linger well beyond the few hours or days union bank philippines 24 hour customer service a single migraine headache. If you have frequent migraines, work with your doctor on a plan to control your pain and prevent these additional medical problems.

    • 1. Your Bowels May Malfunction

      Migraines and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) often go hand in hand. Doctors believe the same changes to the nervous system trigger headaches and problems with digestion. People with IBS often alternate between diarrhea and constipation, and they may also feel bloated or like they always need to go to the bathroom.

    • 2. Your Back Can Ache

      Frequent low back pain strikes somewhere between 13 to 18 times as many people with chronic migraine as those without headaches. With time, pain creates a well-worn path through your nerves and brain, actually changing the structure of your gray matter. As a result, you’re more likely to hurt throughout your body.

    • 3. You Could Have a Stroke

      Strokes occur when blood flow to your brain stops. Migraines double your risk for stroke. The risk appears highest if your migraines are accompanied by aura—visual disturbances such as flashing lights or zig-zag patterns before a headache begins.

    • 4. You Risk Even More Headaches

      Chronic migraines may have you frequently reaching for the medicine cabinet. But if you take pain-relieving drugs more than two or three times a week, you could develop rebound headaches. These occur when your medication wears off more quickly each time and the pain returns stronger than before.

    • 5. Your Vision Shifts

      Some types of migraines result in brief periods of vision loss or changes. Other, less common types cause your eyelids to droop and your pupils to enlarge. They’re accompanied by double vision that may last for weeks after the pain in wells fargo bank branch locations near me head subsides.

    • 6. Your Sleep May Suffer

      Pain from a migraine may make it difficult for you to fall or stay asleep. In addition, chronic migraines have been linked to changes in the way your body transitions between stages of slumber, interrupting your rest. Poor sleep can, in turn, worsen head pain.

    • 7. You Might Lose Your Hearing

      It’s rare but terrifying: Sudden sensorineural hearing loss causes rapid hearing loss over a 72-hour period. This condition appears about twice as frequently in people with chronic migraines. Doctors aren’t sure why, but they suspect damage to tiny blood vessels in the ear may link the two conditions.

    • 8. You Could Have Seizures

      Similar patterns occur in chronic migraines and the seizure disorder epilepsy: Rapidly firing neurons induce sudden attacks of symptoms, followed by periods in which you’re symptom-free. Migraines can trigger seizures in people with epilepsy. And people with both conditions often don’t respond to anti-seizure medications.

    • 9. You Risk Developing Other Types of Chronic Pain

      In one study, one-third of chronic migraine patients had fibromyalgia, a condition characterized by widespread pain, fatigue, and depression. That’s significantly more than the 4% reported in the general population. Any type of chronic pain rewires the way the brain processes pain signals. The constant throbbing of headaches may overexcite your entire body’s pain responses, predisposing you to more extensive aching.

    • 10. Your Blood Pressure May Rise

      Women with migraines appear more likely to develop high blood pressure during pregnancy, and some studies have linked hypertension to chronic migraines in all adults. Malfunctions in your autonomic nervous system, which controls involuntary motions such as your blood pressure and heart rate, may underlie both conditions.

    • 11. Your Mood May Sink

      Depression, anxiety, and bipolar disorder all affect more people with migraines than those without. In part, they result from fearing when the next attack will strike. But scientists increasingly suspect common brain pathways link chronic migraines with psychological conditions.

    11 Ways Migraines Are Dangerous for Your Health

    1. Ohara, T, et al.  Another Case of Lower Back Pain Associated With Migraine: The Importance of Specific Questions. Britannica great books of the western world ebay of Child Neurology. May 2013;(28)5:680.
    2. Ligthart, L, et al. Anxiety and Depression Are Associated With Migraine and Pain in General: An Investigation of the Interrelationships. The Journal of Pain. April 2013;(14)4:363-70.
    3. Yoon, M, et al. Chronic migraine and chronic tension-type headache are associated with concomitant low back pain: Results of the German Headache Consortium study. Pain. March 2013;(154)3:484-92.
    4. Increased Risk of Hemorrhagic Stroke in Patients with Migraine: A Population-Based Cohort Study.
    5. Sachdev, A; Marmura, MJ. Metabolic syndrome and migraine. Frontiers in Neurology. 2012;3(161).
    6. Health department lexington tn, T. and Diener, H, et al. Migraine and Stroke: Perspectives for Stroke Physicians. Stroke. Dec. 2012; 43(12):3421-6.
    7. Chu, C, et al. Migraine is a risk factor for sudden sensorineural hearing loss: A nationwide population-based study. Cephalalgia. Jan. 2013;33(2):80-6.
    8. Rodriguez-Sainz, A, et al. Migraine, Stroke and Epilepsy: Underlying and Interrelated Causes, Diagnosis and Treatment. Current Treatment Options in Cardiovascular Medicine. Feb. 17, 2013, online ahead of print.
    9. SemizM, et al. Prevalence of migraine and co-morbid psychiatric disorders among students of Cumhuriyet University.  Journal of Headache & Pain. April 11, 2013;14(1):34. 
    10. Cady, RK, et al. The Bowel and Migraine: Update on Celiac Disease and Irritable Bowel Syndrome. Current Pain and Headache Reports. June 2012;(16)3:278-86.
    11. Küçüksen, S, et al. The prevalence of fibromyalgia and its relation with headache characteristics in episodic migraine. Clinical Rheumatology. Feb. 27, 2013; online ahead of print.
    12. Migraine fact sheet. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Office on Women's Health, 2011. http://womenshealth.gov/publications/our-publications/fact-sheet/migraine.cfm
    13. Migraine and Common Morbidities. American Headache Society, 2011. http://www.achenet.org/resources/migraine_and_common_morbidities/?print=y
    14. What Is a Stroke? National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute, Feb. 1, 2011. http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/health-topics/topics/stroke/printall-index.html
    15. Headache: Hope Through Research. National Institutes of Health. National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, April 23, 2013. http://www.ninds.nih.gov/disorders/headache/detail_headache.htm
    16. Migraine Information Page. National Institutes of Health. National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, Feb. 11, 2013. http://www.ninds.nih.gov/disorders/migraine/migraine.htm

    Medical Reviewer: William C. Lloyd III, MD, FACS

    Last Review Date: 2021 Jul 24

    View All Your Guide to Preventing Migraines Articles

    THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for informational purposes only. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

    Источник: https://www.healthgrades.com/right-care/migraine-and-headache/11-ways-migraines-are-dangerous-for-your-health

    15 Natural Ways to Reduce Migraine Symptoms

    Migraine attacks aren’t typical headaches. You may experience pounding pain, nausea, and sensitivity to light and sound. When a migraine attack or episode occurs, you’ll do almost anything to make it go away.

    Natural remedies are drug-free methods of reducing migraine symptoms. These at-home treatments may help prevent the onset of migraine attacks or at least help reduce their severity and duration.

    Keep reading as we take a look at 15 natural remedies that may help you manage migraine symptoms.

    Note that migraine attacks may require treatment with prescription or over-the-counter (OTC) medication. Speak with a doctor about a treatment plan that works for you.

    1. Avoid certain foods

    Diet plays a vital role in preventing migraine attacks. Many foods and beverages may be migraine triggers, such as:

    • foods with nitrates, including hot dogs, deli meats, bacon, and sausage
    • chocolate
    • cheese that contains the naturally occurring compound tyramine, such as blue, feta, cheddar, Parmesan, and Swiss
    • alcohol, especially red wine
    • foods that contain monosodium glutamate (MSG), a flavor enhancer
    • foods that are very cold, such as ice cream or iced drinks
    • processed foods
    • pickled foods
    • beans
    • dried fruits
    • cultured dairy products, such as buttermilk, sour cream, and yogurt

    A small amount of caffeine may ease migraine pain in some people. Caffeine is also in some migraine medications. But too much caffeine may cause a migraine attack. It may also lead to a severe caffeine withdrawal headache.

    To figure out which foods and beverages trigger migraine attacks for you, keep a daily food journal. Record everything you eat and note how you feel afterward.

    2. Apply lavender oil

    Inhaling lavender essential oil may ease migraine pain. Lavender oil may be inhaled directly or diluted with a carrier oil and applied in small amounts to your temples.

    A 2016 randomized controlled study found evidence that 3 months of lavender therapy as a prophylactic therapy, meaning taken before a migraine attack begins, reduced frequency and severity of migraine attacks. However, research is still limited.

    A published in the journal Phytotherapy Research examined the ability of various herbal treatments, including lavender therapy for migraine. The authors found mixed or limited evidence to support the use of butterbur and feverfew for treating migraine but didn’t note that current research supports the use of lavender.

    According to the authors, many studies had a high risk for bias, and more high quality research is needed.

    3. Try acupuncture

    Acupuncture involves injecting very thin needles into certain parts of your skin to stimulate relief from a wide variety of health conditions.

    A found that 20 sessions of manual acupuncture along with usual care was more effective at preventing migraine in people with a history of episodic migraine without aura than sham acupuncture along with usual care. Sham acupuncture is a treatment where the needles are not inserted as deeply.

    A also found moderate evidence that acupuncture may reduce headache symptoms. In the results britannica great books of the western world ebay, the authors explain that if people had 6 days of migraine per month before treatment, it would be expected that they would have:

    4. Look for feverfew

    Feverfew is a flowering herb that looks like a daisy. It’s a folk remedy for migraine. It still isn’t well-studied, but there is some evidence that it may be slightly more effective than a placebo for treating migraine.

    In awhich is an update of a previous 2004 study, the authors concluded that larger studies are needed to support the use of feverfew for treating migraine.

    The authors note that one larger study published since the 2004 review found 0.6 fewer migraine days per month in people who took feverfew versus a placebo. They describe previous studies as low quality or providing mixed evidence.

    The published in Phytotherapy Researchalso summarizes the finding on feverfew as “mixed.”

    5. Apply peppermint oil

    The chemical menthol found in peppermint oil may help prevent migraine episodes, although there’s a very limited amount of research.

    A compared the effects of nasal 4 percent lidocaine with 1.5 percent peppermint essential oil and a placebo for managing migraine symptoms.

    The researchers found that 40 percent of people in the lidocaine and peppermint oil groups experienced considerable improvements in their symptoms, compared with only 4.9 percent of people in the placebo group.

    The home remedies for migraine headache in hindi that very little research has examined peppermint leaf, but a limited amount of evidence suggests topical peppermint oil may benefit tension headaches.

    6. Ginger

    Ginger is known to ease nausea caused by many conditions, including migraine. It may have pain-relieving benefits for migraine attacks. According to aone randomized controlled study found evidence that ginger may have beneficial activity.

    More research is needed to understand the extent and usefulness of ginger for treating migraine-related pain.

    7. Sign up for yoga

    Yoga uses breathing, meditation, and body postures to promote health and well-being. A found yoga may relieve the frequency, duration, and intensity of migraine attacks. It’s thought to improve anxiety, release tension in migraine-trigger areas, and improve vascular health.

    The researchers concluded that yoga could be beneficial as a complementary therapy for treating migraine.

    8. Try biofeedback

    Biofeedback is a relaxation method. It teaches you to control autonomic reactions to stress. During this therapy, electrodes are applied to your skin to monitor physiologic processes that change with stress, such as your heart rate, blood pressure, and muscle tension.

    During a biofeedback session, you work with a therapist to manage stress using changes in your physiologic processes as feedback.

    According to athere’s good evidence to support the use of mind-body interventions such as biofeedback and cognitive behavioral therapy for treating migraine. These therapies are effectively free of side effects and may make a good alternative for medication for some people.

    10. Book a massage

    Massage may reduce migraine frequency. Migraine is associated with low serotonin in the brain, and massage has been shown to increase serotonin. There’s limited evidence to support the use of massage for migraine relief, but it’s generally safe and has a low risk of side effects.

    11. Try acupressure for home remedies for migraine headache in hindi nausea

    Acupressure is the practice of applying pressure with the fingers home remedies for migraine headache in hindi hands to specific points on the body capital one venture card online login relieve pain and other symptoms.

    A found evidence that acupuncture may help manage migraine-related nausea during treatment, but that it doesn’t improve pain or quality of life.

    13. Staying hydrated

    According to the American Migraine Foundation, about a third of home remedies for migraine headache in hindi with migraine report dehydration as a migraine trigger.

    To prevent dehydration, make sure to drink plenty of water throughout the day, especially when exercising. On hot days, you may need to drink more water than usual.

    14. Try to get a good night’s sleep

    The connection between sleep and migraine still isn’t entirely clear. has found a correlation between high migraine frequency and poor sleep quality. This association is true in people with migraine with and without aura.

    Going to bed at the same time each night, avoiding caffeine late in the day, and avoiding stimulating activities before bed are some of the ways you can improve your sleep.

    15. Butterbur

    Butterbur is a plant that grows throughout Europe, Asia, and North America. Up untilthe American Academy of Neurology recommended using it for preventing migraine attacks. In 2015, they stopped their recommendation due to the possibility of liver toxicity.

    The recommends only using pyrrolizidine alkaloid-free butterbur products, as this chemical can damage the liver, lungs, and circulation. Speak with a doctor before taking butterbur.

    Takeaway

    If you have migraine, you know the symptoms can be challenging. You might miss work or not be able to participate in activities you love. But the remedies above may provide some relief.

    It might also be helpful to speak with others who understand exactly what you’re going through. Our free app, Migraine Healthline, connects you with real people who experience migraine. Ask treatment-related questions and seek advice from others who get it. Download the app for iPhone or Android.

    If your migraine attacks or episodes don’t respond to home remedies, it’s important to talk with a doctor. Visit a doctor if your symptoms are severe, frequent, or interfere with your daily life.

    Источник: https://www.healthline.com/health/natural-ways-to-reduce-migraines

    Everything you need to know about migraine

    We include products we think are useful for our readers. If you buy through links on this page, we may earn a small commission. Here’s our process.

    Migraine is a medical condition that involves severe, recurring headaches and other symptoms.

    A migraine episode walmart money card balance espanol a type of headache. An episode usually occurs in stages and can last for several days. Severe cases can affect a person’s daily life, including their ability to work or study.

    Migraine can affect people in different ways, and the triggers, severity, symptoms, and frequency can vary. Some people have more than one episode each week, while others have them only occasionally.

    In 2018, researchers found that of adults in the United States had experienced a migraine episode or a severe headache within the last 3 months.

    Research from 2015 found that migraine affects just over of females and 9% of males. Episodes often occur in people aged 18–44 years, but they can happen at any time, including during home remedies for migraine headache in hindi of migraine tend to occur in stages:

    Before the headache: According to research from 2008, of people with migraine experience symptoms that start hours or days before the headache.

    At this stage, a person might experience a “prodrome,” which may involve emotional changes, specifically depression and irritability. A prodrome can also include yawning, dizziness, thirst, frequent urination, and sensitivity to light and sound.

    Sometimes an aura can occur. This involves physical or sensory symptoms, such as flashing lights in the field of vision.

    During the headache: Alongside a mild to severe, throbbing or pulsing headache, symptoms may include nausea, vomiting, neck pain, dizziness, and nasal congestion.

    Resolution: After the headache, tiredness and irritability may last another 2 days. This is sometimes called the “migraine hangover.”

    Other common features of migraine are:

    • head pain that worsens during physical activity or straining
    • an inability to perform regular activities due to the pain
    • increased sensitivity to light and sound that can sometimes be relived by lying quietly in a darkened room

    Other symptoms may include sweating, feeling unusually hot or cold, a stomachache, and diarrhea.

    Find out what else can cause a headache, nausea, and fatigue here.

    Migraine vs. headache

    A migraine episode is different from a typical headache. The experience is different, and they can have different causes.

    Writing down the symptoms and when they occur can help a person and their healthcare professional identify migraine episodes. Keep this journal for at least 8 weeks, and note down:

    • the time that symptoms start
    • possible triggers, such as stress or menstruation
    • the nature of the headache
    • any other symptoms
    • how long the symptoms last
    • any noticeable indicators of migraine, such as an aura
    • any medications and their effects

    Learn more about the differences between migraine and a headache here.

    Causes and triggers

    Experts think that migraine episodes may stem from changes in the brain that affect the:

    • way nerves communicate
    • balance of chemicals
    • blood vessels

    Genetic features may also play a role — having a of migraine is a common risk factor.

    Migraine triggers vary from person to person. They commonly include:

    • hormonal changes, such as those related to menstruation
    • emotional triggers, such as stress, depression, anxiety, and excitement
    • dietary factors, including alcohol, caffeine, chocolate, nuts, cheese, citrus fruits, and foods containing the additives tyramine and monosodium glutamate (MSG)
    • medications, such as sleeping pills, hormone replacement therapy (HRT), and some birth control pills
    • environmental factors, including flickering screens, strong smells, secondhand smoke, loud noises, humidity, stuffy rooms, temperature changes, and bright lights

    Some other possible triggers include:

    • tiredness
    • a lack of sleep
    • shoulder and neck tension
    • poor posture
    • physical overexertion
    • low blood sugar
    • jet lag
    • irregular mealtimes
    • dehydration

    Avoiding triggers, when possible, may help reduce the frequency of migraine episodes.

    What causes headaches? Find out here.

    Research data on race and ethnicity

    Migraine can be a debilitating condition that is underdiagnosed and challenging to treat. This can be seen especially in BIPOC fraud department for bank of america, Indigenous, and People of Color) populations. People of Color are less likely to receive the diagnosis of migraine and the treatment than white people.

    In fact, only have an official migraine diagnosis, compared with 70% of white people in the country. And other research found that Latino people are 50% less likely to receive a formal migraine diagnosis than white people. These disparities can impact treatment and therapies.

    While these figures could lead to the conclusion that white people experience more migraine episodes than other groups, looking at the average prevalence of severe headache or migraine from 2005 to 2012 in the U.S. found that the prevalence rates of home remedies for migraine headache in hindi across all groups were similar:

    • 17.7% of Native American people
    • 15.5% of white people
    • 14.5% of Hispanic people
    • 14.45% of Black people
    • 9.2% of Asian people

    Furthermore, females in all groups were approximately twice as likely to experience migraine episodes than males.

    Overall, studies that discuss migraine and use racial and ethnic differences for clarity often do not consider contributing factors. Further research is warranted, and this should consider behavioral, environmental, genetic, and socioeconomic factors, as well as access to healthcare.

    Risk factors

    Anyone can develop migraine, and there is a slightly higher risk for people with:

    • depression
    • bipolar disorder
    • fibromyalgia
    • irritable bowel syndrome
    • overactive bladder
    • sleep disorders
    • obsessive-compulsive disorder
    • anxiety

    Is there a link between migraine and COVID-19?

    Treatment

    There is no cure for migraine. However, medications can treat the symptoms when they arise, and people can take steps to reduce the frequency and severity of episodes. But keep in mind that these medications can have side effects.

    Medications

    Pain relief and other types of medication can often help. Taking medication as soon as symptoms start may keep them from becoming severe.

    Some over-the-counter pain relief medications that may benefit people with migraine include:

    Other options include:

    • triptans, such as sumatriptan (Imitrex), to help reverse the brain changes that occur during an episode
    • antiemetics to manage any nausea and vomiting
    • gepants to home remedies for migraine headache in hindi a protein involved in inflammation and pain, called calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP)
    • ditans, which interact with 5-HT1F receptors on the sensory nerves and blood vessels

    It is important to avoid overusing medication because overuse can cause a rebound headache. A healthcare professional can help a person decide how much of each medication is safe and effective.

    Find some tips for instant migraine relief here.

    How to prevent migraine episodes

    While it is not always possible to prevent migraine episodes, there are ways to reduce their frequency and severity.

    Medications

    The following prescription drugs may help reduce the number of episodes that a person with severe migraine experiences:

    It may take several weeks to see an improvement.

    The best treatment in children or adolescents may be different from that in adults. A healthcare professional can help recommend the most effective approach.

    Identifying and avoiding triggers

    A migraine episode tropical financial credit union rates happens in response to a trigger. To identify a trigger, a person might keep a diary and record how they felt and what they did, ate, and drank before the symptoms appeared.

    It may be particularly helpful to avoid:

    • low blood sugar
    • physical overexertion
    • stress
    • certain foods, such as chocolate and any that contain tyramine or MSG
    • certain medications, including HRT and some birth control pills
    • bright lights and flickering screens

    The following strategies may help reduce the frequency of migraine episodes:

    If making these changes does not ease the severity and frequency of migraine episodes, a doctor may suggest medication or other options.

    Types

    There are various types of migraine. A major distinguishing factor is whether they involve aura — sensory changes.

    Migraine with aura

    Aura is a disturbance of the senses in the early stages of a migraine episode.

    Aura can involve:

    • having confusing thoughts or experiences
    • seeing strange, sparkling, or flashing lights that are not there
    • seeing zig-zagging lines of light
    • having blind spots or blank patches in the field of vision
    • having a pins and needles sensation in an arm or leg
    • having difficulty speaking
    • having weakness in the shoulders, neck, or limbs
    • seeing things that are not there out of one eye, such as transparent strings of objects
    • not being able to see part of something clearly
    • having part of the field of vision disappear, then reappear

    A visual aura may feel like the aftermath of a very bright camera flash, but the visual changes may last for several minutes or up to 1 hour.

    Anyone experiencing an aura for the first time should contact a healthcare professional to rule out serious neurological problems, such as a stroke or a brain tumor.

    Find out more about migraine aura here.

    Migraine without aura

    More commonly, a person experiences no sensory disturbances before an episode. According to the Migraine Trust, 70–90% of episodes occur without aura.

    Other types

    Some other types of migraine include:

    • Chronic migraine: This involves having an episode on more than 15 days per month.
    • Menstrual migraine: This occurs in a pattern that follows the menstrual cycle.
    • Hemiplegic migraine: This causes temporary weakness on one side of the body, and it is very rare.
    • Abdominal migraine: This involves migraine episodes with irregular function in the gut and abdomen, often with nausea or vomiting. It mainly affects children under 14 years of age.
    • Vestibular migraine: Severe vertigo is a symptom of this type.
    • Basilarmigraine: This rare type is also called “migraine with brainstem aura,” and it can affect neurological functions, such as speech.

    Anyone who may be experiencing any neurological symptoms should get medical attention. And people who need treatment home remedies for migraine headache in hindi migraine should consult a healthcare professional.

    Diagnosis

    The International Headache Society recommends the “5, 4, 3, 2, 1” criteria to diagnose migraine without aura. These numbers stand for:

    • having 5 or more episodes, each lasting 4 hours to 3 days
    • having a headache with at least 2 of the following qualities:
      – occurring on one side
      – pulsating
      – causing moderate-to-severe pain aggravated by activity
    • having at least 1 additional symptom, such as:
      – nausea
      – vomiting
      – sensitivity to light
      – sensitivity to sound

    The doctor may recommend imaging or other tests to exclude other causes of the symptoms, such as a tumor, meningitis, or a stroke.

    When to see a doctor

    A person should consult a healthcare professional if they experience:

    • what seems like a first migraine episode
    • worsening or unusual migraine symptoms
    • severe symptoms

    If any of the following occur, seek immediate medical help:

    • an unusually severe headache
    • visual disturbances
    • a loss of sensation
    • difficulty speaking

    These could indicate another condition that may need urgent attention, such as a stroke.

    When is it sensible to worry about a headache?

    Summary

    Migraine is a medical condition that involves a headache and other symptoms. It is not just a bad headache, and it can have a significant impact on daily life, making it difficult to work and do everyday activities.

    Identifying and avoiding triggers can often help reduce the frequency or severity of episodes, though it is not always possible to prevent them.

    Medication and other treatments can help manage migraine symptoms. Anyone who has concerns should contact a healthcare professional.

    Read the article in Spanish.

    Источник: https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/148373
    home remedies for migraine headache in hindi

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