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    Is eating garlic cloves good for you


    is eating garlic cloves good for you

    What you should end up with is garlic with a smoother taste that will go perfectly with cold dishes. Better than going raw and setting your. Studies suggest that garlic's impact on heart health may be most beneficial in reducing the causes of heart disease: high blood pressure, high. Garlic brings in a multitude of health benefits, as it boosts metabolism and helps in burning excess fat. It also suppresses appetite and keeps.
    is eating garlic cloves good for you
    is eating garlic cloves good for you

    Is eating garlic cloves good for you -

    Are Onions and Garlic Healthy? Here's What Experts Say

    Garlic and onions are staples for many home cooks. But do these plants actually add any health benefits to your dishes? Or are they purely for flavor?

    People who try to eat colorful fruits and vegetables in order to get a wide range of vitamins and minerals may think that pale foods like onions and garlic don’t offer many nutrients. But although they may not look like nutritional powerhouses, experts say they are.

    Onions of all colors (including white) are good sources of vitamin C, vitamin B6, potassium and folate, while garlic is rich in vitamin C, vitamin B6, thiamin, potassium, calcium, phosphorous, copper and manganese. Plus, onions and garlic are a low-calorie way to add flavor to a dish without resorting to ingredients like butter and salt.

    “Incorporating some garlic and onions into your everyday cooking routine is not only going to be good for the health properties they contain, but it’s also going to make your meals more tasty and hopefully get you more excited about eating nutritious food,” says Jessica Jones, a California-based registered dietitian.

    Garlic and onions — which are part of the allium family, along with shallots, leeks and chives — have so many health properties that they are often considered medicinal foods, especially in healing traditions like Ayurveda.

    Allium vegetables are rich in organosulfur compounds, which preliminary research suggests may be beneficial for lowering cholesterol and blood pressure and helping to prevent chronic conditions including cancer and cardiovascular disease. But it’s not clear how well the body actually uses these compounds after consumption, especially if the foods are cooked before eating. Some research suggests that raw garlic may provide the most health benefits, so some scientists recommend letting raw crushed or chopped garlic stand for at least 10 minutes before cooking, to allow enzyme-catalyzed reactions to occur before preparation.

    Allium vegetables also contain phytochemicals, or chemical compounds in plants that can influence bodily processes. Research suggests that phytochemicals, including those in allium vegetables, may improve immune health and reduce the risk of developing cancer by preventing inflammation, cell damage and DNA damage, according to the American Institute of Cancer Research. Studies have also suggested that garlic and onions have anti-bacterial and anti-viral properties.

    What’s clear is that allium vegetables are generally good for gut health. That’s because they contain prebiotics: compounds that feed the microorganisms in fermented foods (otherwise known as probiotics) and “help maintain a healthy gut biome,” says Cara Harbstreet, a Kansas City-based registered dietitian. A 2018 research review found that prebiotic fiber, like that in garlic and onions, may be even better for your gut than the fiber in some fruits, vegetables and whole grains.

    One important caveat, however, is that onions and garlic are high in FODMAPs. These are short-chain carbohydrates like sugars and fibers that are, for some people, poorly absorbed by the small intestine. Eating lots of them can cause gastrointestinal distress for people with sensitive GI tracts or conditions like irritable bowel syndrome and acid reflux, resulting in symptoms like gas, bloating, diarrhea and constipation, Jones says. Even garlic and onion powder may cause these reactions.

    If you notice gastrointestinal discomfort after eating onions or garlic, it may be worth consulting a registered dietitian to see if FODMAPs are the problem, Harbstreet says. For people who don’t tolerate allium vegetables well, Jones recommends getting a flavor boost from things like garlic-infused olive oil.

    Otherwise, there’s no reason to limit your consumption — at least nutritionally speaking. “It adds a lot of flavor to your meals, which can enhance pleasure and satisfaction from your eating experience,” Harbstreet says. “If you’re not rushing into a work meeting or sitting very close to someone else, there’s really no reason to temper your intake.”

    More Must-Read Stories From TIME

    Write to Jamie Ducharme at [email protected]

    Источник: https://time.com/5566916/are-garlic-and-onions-healthy/
    Garlic is an herb that simply provides that “wow” factor in all sort of cuisines. However, few folks know that this superfood offers a bunch of medicinal properties. It can help protect your heart and defend against colds, bronchitis, infections, high blood pressure, and stroke. Find out more about this powerful and tasty ingredient now. https://foodal.com/knowledge/herbs-spices/cooking-health-benefits-garlic/

    Garlic, also known as “the stinking rose,” has been used for its medicinal properties for thousands of years. Ancient Egyptian slaves were fed garlic to rejuvenate their bodies and increase stamina (after all, construction of the pyramids was hard work).

    Besides being super tasty in various cuisines throughout the world, garlic is highly regarded as a preventative against heart disease, high blood pressure, and stroke, as well as colds, bronchitis, & infections. Read more now about all of the various wonders this super herb is capable of.

    Soldiers in the Greek and Roman armies ingested garlic both before and during battle. Europeans regularly included it in their diets during the plague years, and soldiers used it as an antibiotic. The herb’s antiseptic properties were later confirmed by chemist and microbiologist Louis Pasteur.

    Garlic is an herb that simply provides that “wow” factor in all sort of cuisines. However, few folks know that this superfood has a bunch of medicinal properties. It can help protect your heart and defend against colds, bronchitis, infections, high blood pressure, and stroke. Find out more about this powerful and tasty ingredient now. https://foodal.com/knowledge/herbs-spices/cooking-health-benefits-garlic/

    It obviously did not take a scientist to realize the benefits provided, but Pasteur’s observations and reports led to its use as a gangrene preventative during the World Wars, and also emboldened Albert Schweitzer to test it as a preventative for dysentery in Africa.

    As a bulbous vegetable, it can be grown most anywhere, although colder winter weather is said to produce heartier, more flavorful bulbs.

    Planting your cloves during the fall allows for maximum root growth before heavy frost sets in, whereas the winter months that follow provide the perfect environment for bulbs to form.

    Plant cloves with the pointed end facing upward, at least two inches below the surface of the soil and six inches apart. Note: the larger the clove, the larger the bulb it will yield.

    Summer stalk shoots can be removed and consumed (perfect for soups), or they can be left on the plant until the bulbs are ready for harvest – your choice.

    Healthy and tasty reasons to consume garlic - Foodal.com

    Known to be relatively consistently disease- and pest-free, the herb does have one huge predatory fan in the animal world – and that would be the gopher. I don’t see many of those around my house.

    Nonetheless, gardening requires attention, and garlic plants require adequate amounts of water, fertilizer, and weeding.

    It is recommended that cloves planted in the fall be harvested early in the summer. Spring plantings will be ready for harvest in mid- to late summer.

    Once harvested, tie your bulbs, creating a bouquet. Hang it to dry in a cool, airy, shady area. Garlic can be stored for up to four months in an appropriate container (breathable and cool).

     Bouquet of garlic bulbs hanging to dry - Foodal.com

    As already mentioned, garlic has historically been valued medicinally for a variety of illnesses and complaints. Today, garlic consumption is highly regarded as a preventative against heart disease, high blood pressure, and stroke, and is considered an important ingredient in many popular diets plans.

    Garlic is attributed with lowering “bad” cholesterol (LDL) and raising the “good” (HDL).

    This helps to prevent plaque buildup in our arteries, as well as the formation of blood clots, which are leading causes of heart attacks and strokes.

    Freshly cut or pressed garlic emits hydrogen sulfide, a disinfectant that helps to kill germs in the body. Once garlic is consumed, our body absorbs it into the bloodstream, which then carries it throughout the various organs, and thus, avails our skin, intestines, urinary, and respiratory systems with its healing properties.

    A whole roasted bulb of garlic with sliced up French bread - Foodal.com

    Eating garlic throughout the day is said to relieve ulcers. A delicious piece of freshly baked bread topped off with a savory garlic spread, or some garlicky Italian-style chicken wings are great ways to take advantage of garlic’s antibiotic qualities, though eating it raw is even better. Follow the instructions below to make your own delicious spread.

    Note that some experts suggest women who are pregnant or nursing should not consume large quantities of garlic. 

    Roasted Garlic Spread with a dash of dry mustard  <div><div><p>Men and women generally agree, garlic on the breath isn't pleasant. But according to a new study, men who eat garlic actually smell more pleasant and attractive to the opposite sex—not their breath, but their body odor. And if that finding isn’t counter-intuitive enough, it’s made all the stranger by the fact that only men in the study who consumed a lot of garlic—the equivalent of four bulbs a day—enjoyed the effect.</p><p>The study had three phases in which the amount and type (bulbs or capsules) of garlic given to 42 male participants were varied. The researchers collected their body odor with pads worn for 12 hours, which were subsequently sniffed by 82 women who rated their pleasantness, attractiveness and intensity.</p><p>In the first phase, the men ate 6 grams of garlic (about two cloves worth) with bread and cheese. The women who sniffed their pads didn’t rate their odor any differently than they rated the odor of men who ate only bread and cheese. In the next phase researchers doubled the amount to 12 grams, or four cloves. In this case the women judged the odor as significantly more pleasant, attractive and less intense than the non-garlic odor. In the final phase the men consumed 12 grams in capsules and the women again rated their odor as more attractive and less intense.</p><p>The results suggest that something about garlic in body odor is attractive to the opposite sex, but what and why? While the study doesn’t provide solid answers, the researchers speculate that the health-boosting benefits of eating garlic may be discernable in body odor, producing an olfactory marker of good health for the opposite sex to home in on.</p><p>According to study co-author Craig Roberts, Professor of Psychology at the University of Stirling, UK, “From an evolutionary perspective, formation of preferences for diet-associated body odors was possibly shaped by means of sexual selection. Previous research indicates that many animal species use diet-associated cues to select mates in good physical condition.”</p><p>Again, this is speculative, but there’s decent evidence linking garlic to a few notable health boosts, and it’s conceivable that one or more of them could be identifiable in human sweat.</p><p>Roberts adds, “As the health benefits of garlic consumption include antioxidant, immunostimulant, cardiovascular, bactericidal and anti-cancer effects, it is plausible that human odor preferences have been shaped by sexual selection.”</p><p>Or it’s possible that once garlic is digested, it simply produces a chemical reaction evidenced in male sweat that is, for whatever reason, appealing to women. At least some women.</p><p>Either way, the results are intriguing and eating more garlic from a health standpoint isn't a bad idea, side benefits notwithstanding.</p><p>The study will be published in the journal <em>Appetite</em>.</p><p><strong><em>You can find David DiSalvo on Twitter @neuronarrative and at his website daviddisalvo.org.</em></strong></p><p> </p></div>Источник: https://www.forbes.com/sites/daviddisalvo/2015/11/15/men-who-eat-garlic-make-women-take-notice-in-a-good-way/</div> <div><div><div><p>Click to rate this post!</p><div><p>[Total: 45  Average: 3.9]</p></div></div><p>Garlic has been part of the kitchens for centuries. This herb has curative and medicinal properties because of its antibacterial and antiseptic nature. The beneficial properties of garlic are because of a compound, Allicin. It is rich in minerals like phosphorus, zinc, potassium, and magnesium. Vitamins C, K, Folate, niacin and thiamine also are found abundantly in garlic.</p><h3><strong>The Health Benefits of Eating Garlic are</strong>:</h3><h3><strong>Wards Off Cough and Cold</strong></h3><p>Raw garlic has the potential to ward off cough and cold infections. Eating two crushed garlic cloves on an empty stomach has the maximum benefit. For kids and babies, hanging garlic cloves in a thread around their necks is supposed to relieve congestion symptoms.</p><h3><strong>Good for Cardiac Health</strong></h3><p>Allicin, a compound found in garlic stops the oxidizing of LDL (bad cholesterol). This reduces <strong>cholesterol levels</strong> and improves heart health. Regular consumption of garlic reduces the incidence of blood clots and thus helps prevent thromboembolism. Garlic also lowers blood pressure so is good for patients with hypertension. Read more on <strong>how to control high blood pressure</strong>.</p><p>Also Read: <strong>2o Essential tips for a Healthy Heart</strong></p><h3><strong>Improves Brain Functioning</strong></h3><p>Garlic promotes brain health because of its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. It is effective against neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer’s and dementia. Also, read more on the <strong>best brain foods to include in your diet</strong>.</p><h3><strong>Improves Digestion</strong></h3><p>Digestive problems improve with the inclusion of raw garlic in the diet. It benefits the intestines and reduces inflammation. Eating raw garlic helps to clear out intestinal worms. The good thing is that it destroys the bad bacteria and protects the good bacteria in the gut.</p><h3><strong>Balances Blood Sugar</strong></h3><p>Those who suffer from diabetes observe their blood sugar levels regulating the consumption of raw garlic. Also, read <strong>10 harmful effects of sugar</strong>.</p><h3><strong>Boosts Immunity</strong></h3><p>Garlic protects against free radicals and prevents damage to the DNA. Zinc in garlic promotes immunity. Vitamin C helps to fight off infections. It is very beneficial against eye and ear infections as it has antimicrobial properties.</p><h3><strong>Improves Skin Health</strong></h3><p>Garlic helps prevent acne and lightens acne scars. Cold sores, psoriasis, rashes, and blisters can all benefit from the application of garlic juice. It also protects against UV rays and therefore prevents ageing.</p><p>Read More: <strong>7 Home Remedies for Glowing Skin</strong></p><h3><strong>Prevents Cancer and Peptic Ulcer</strong></h3><p>Because of a high amount of antioxidants, garlic protects the body against lung, prostate, bladder, stomach, liver and colon cancer. The antibacterial action of garlic prevents peptic ulcers as it eliminates the contagion from the gut.</p><h3><strong>Good for Weight Loss</strong></h3><p>Garlic reduces the expression of genes responsible for the formation of adipose cells which store fat. It also increases thermogenesis in the body and leads to the burning of more fat and the lowering of LDL (bad cholesterol).</p><div><figure><img width=

    Fights UTI and Improves Renal Health

    Fresh garlic juice has the potential to reduce the growth of E. Coli bacteria that cause urinary tract infection (UTI). It also helps prevent kidney infections.

    Garlic reduces infections on wounds, promotes hair growth, bone health and liver health. Most of the home remedies are effective only if garlic is consumed raw.

    Reduces Exercise Fatigue

    According to studies from Japan, raw garlic when aged in a mixture of water and alcohol may have significant effects on exercise endurance. Human studies have also been conducted that have shown that garlic can indeed improve the symptoms of exercise fatigue. 

    Reduces Blood Toxicity

    For people who are susceptible to lead poisoning due to occupational hazards, garlic may be the best organic solution. Studies conducted in 2012 have revealed that garlic is in fact, safer and better at reducing lead poisoning of the blood than d-Penicillamine, which is the common drug used to treat the same.

    Overcome Oestrogen Deficiency

    The period of menopause for older women has often been associated with a lack of the female hormone known as oestrogen due to irregular production of a protein known as a cytokine. Consumption of garlic has been seen to regulate this to some extent and therefore, may be effective in overcoming oestrogen deficiency after menopause.

    Reduce Effects or Onset of Osteoarthritis

    Consuming garlic in your regular diet can also help to prevent or reduce the onset of osteoarthritis. Research has shown that garlic contains a compound known as diallyl disulphide which helps to maintain bone density and therefore can potentially delay the onset of bone-related ailments like osteoarthritis.

    Prevent Heart Blockages

    Garlic is also believed to help reduce the stickiness of the platelets in your blood. These platelets are responsible for the clotting of blood. Consuming a healthy dose of garlic can help reduce the excessive clotting effect of platelets on the blood. Therefore, it may help prevent unnecessary blood clots inside arteries that may reach up to your heart causing a heart attack.

    Also Read: 10 Health Benefits of Turmeric

    Disclaimer: The information included at this site is for educational purposes only and is not intended to be a substitute for medical treatment by a health care professional. Because of unique individual needs, the reader should consult their physician to determine the appropriateness of the information for the reader’s situation.

    Источник: https://pharmeasy.in/blog/top-10-health-benefits-of-garlic/

    Is Garlic Good For You?

    A selection of garlic heads and some cloves on a wooden table

    Garlic has a long history in traditional medicine and as a way to make our food taste better. Many of us have been eating garlic throughout our lives without any apparent ill effects. For that reason, asking is garlic good for you? might seem like a strange idea indeed.

    However, the question only seems strange because we often get stuck on the idea that anything natural is good for us and anything artificial isn’t. There are plenty of examples of that pattern too, like how leafy greens and spices offer health benefits, while products like Gatorade and Ensure use concerning additives.

    Even so, there are many cases where natural foods aren’t as beneficial as they seem. The high oxalate content of spinach, for example, can contribute to kidney stones, while the vitamin K present interacts with blood thinning medications. That’s just one example. There are countless others.  

    Garlic is similar to spinach in that it offers plenty of benefits and has some concerning features as well. Whether it’s a good choice or not strongly depends on your needs and the amount you plan on eating.

    Table of Contents

    Is Garlic Good For Your Health?

    • How Garlic Influences Your Health
    • The Many Benefits Of Garlic
    • The Risks Of Garlic
    • Can You Eat Raw Garlic?
    • Is Black Garlic Healthy?
    • How Much Garlic Should You Consume?
    • What About Supplements And Extracts?
    • Final Thoughts

    How Garlic Influences Your Health

    A selection of fresh garlic bulbs on the ground, one of which has had its skin removed

    The Allicin

    Garlic is most famous for allicin. This is a defense molecule that’s produced from an interaction between alliin and alliinase. Alliin is an amino acid that’s found in fresh garlic, while alliinase is produced when garlic is chopped or crushed. This reaction is why crushed garlic has a much stronger smell than garlic cloves.

    Allicin itself has been studied in-depth and linked to a variety of benefits. We’ll talk about some of these shortly. You can even find allicin supplements, which give you an easier way to increase your allicin intake.

    However, allicin isn’t a stable compound and quickly breaks down. Allicin also doesn’t survive in garlic once it’s been cooked, potentially making raw garlic the healthiest choice.

    Other Compounds

    Allicin might be the most famous molecule in garlic, but it isn’t the only important one. Other sulfur compounds are present too, ones that have also been linked to health, including s-allyl cysteine and diallyl disulfide.

    Some of these compounds come from allicin breaking down. In fact, diallyl trisulfide is the version that you’ll often see in supplements, as allicin itself isn’t stable enough.

    The Nutrients

    There are also some important nutrients in garlic. The main ones are vitamin C, manganese, and selenium, while there are also smaller amounts of copper, iron, potassium, and some B vitamins present.

    Garlic also happens to be nutritionally dense and low in calories, making it an easy way to boost your intake of these vital vitamins and minerals.

    Nutrients all play crucial roles in our bodies, helping everything to function as it should, including our muscles, our organs, and even our blood. While you can find the same nutrients in plenty of other foods, garlic is an easy choice, as you can add it to countless recipes.   

    Don’t forget about the antioxidants either. Antioxidants are common in plant-based foods, helping to protect our bodies and protect us from disease.  

    The Many Benefits Of Garlic

    A glass jar of fermented garlic cloves, next to some pieces of garlic on a wooden table

    Garlic’s benefits have been known throughout history. As far back as Hippocrates, people have been prescribing garlic as a way to treat ailments.

    These days, garlic has been the subject of many studies – and some of the potential benefits have been proven.

    Decreases Cholesterol Levels

    Studies have shown that garlic can lower total cholesterol levels and LDL cholesterol levels, often by between 10% to 15%. This effect is important, as high cholesterol levels are thought to increase your risk of heart disease.

    As such, eating garlic regularly could help to protect your heart. Including garlic as part of a heart-healthy diet is even more powerful.

    Lowers Blood Pressure Too

    Blood pressure is another important area. High blood pressure increases the risk of heart diseases and other health problems.

    Finding natural ways to decrease blood pressure may be a powerful way to protect health – and garlic could help in this area.

    Most studies on this topic have focused on garlic supplements or aged garlic extract. In some cases, the garlic was as effective as blood pressure medication.

    The catch is that garlic supplements and extracts are more concentrated than regular garlic. You might need as much as 4 cloves of garlic per day to get the same effect (which, honestly, is too much for most of us).

    Improves Your Immune System

    Boosting our immune system can help our body to fight off infection and stay healthier. Researchers often look at this by seeing how a given food or supplement influences the risk of a common condition, like getting a cold or the flu.

    One such study showed that an allicin supplement reduced the likelihood of contracting a cold and improved recovery speed for people who did end up sick. A second study found a similar effect from aged garlic extract.

    Once again, the studies focused on supplements rather than garlic itself. There hasn’t been much evidence either, so more studies are needed before we can be confident.

    Still, you can always experiment for yourself.

    Decreases Oxidative Stress

    Like many foods, garlic is a decent source of antioxidants. These help to protect your body from free radical damage, while reducing your oxidative stress.

    Such effects are thought to improve your health in various ways, like protecting against cognitive decline, cancer, and more.

    Allicin Has Anti-Microbial Effects

    The allicin in your garlic is powerful against various microbes, including those that are resistant to antibiotics. This effect could lead to health benefits too, like helping your body to fight infection or promoting ulcer healing.

    The Risks Of Garlic

    A brown bowl of crushed garlic, in front of a garlic press on a wooden table

    It Can Cause Side Effects

    Garlic doesn’t agree with everyone. Some people experience significant side effects, like gas, heartburn, and diarrhea. There’s also the chance of allergic reactions and an increased risk of bleeding.

    Gastro side effects are particularly common, as some compounds in garlic create gas. These side effects are strongest if you’re eating garlic raw on an empty stomach (which some people do as a way to increase their garlic intake). If you’re sensitive, try using garlic in meals instead.

    Side effects tend to increase with garlic dose as well, meaning that you should be cautious when using garlic supplements.

    Consuming food at the same time as garlic or garlic supplements often helps to reduce the risk of side effects.

    There are also significant side effects from using garlic on your skin, either on its own or as part of a gel or a paste. Some people end up with a sensation that’s similar to a burn, where the garlic may even damage their skin. This use may even be unsafe and is best avoided.

    Garlic Interacts With Some Medications

    There are also significant interactions between garlic and some medications. For example, garlic changes how quickly the body breaks down some HIV/AIDS medications, making the medications less effective.

    Hormonal birth control pills can be affected by garlic as well. This interaction is so significant that you might need a secondary form of birth control.

    Birth control pills and HIV/AIDS medications are just two examples. There are plenty of other times where garlic interacts with medications.

    Such effects mean that anyone going beyond regular dietary intake of garlic should talk to their doctor about possible issues. This is even more true if you’re eating raw garlic, as the allicin content of raw garlic is much higher than with cooked garlic.

    Increases The Risk Of Bleeding

    Garlic also acts as a blood thinner. This can be a problem in multiple situations, like if you are taking blood thinning medication, have blood clotting issues, or need to have some type of surgery.

    The biggest risks come from high doses of garlic. So, having garlic supplements or eating 4 cloves of raw garlic per day, for example, might put your health at risk. Using a clove every so often in cooking isn’t likely to have a big effect.

    That said, if you are worried about bleeding at all, please talk to your doctor. Various foods, conditions, and medications can influence your blood clotting – and it’s always best to be on the safe side.

    High Doses Mightn’t Always Be Safe

    The quantities of garlic that we normally use in food appear to be safe for most people. No surprises there, right? After all, we’ve been using garlic for a long time.

    Problems start to arise when you increase the dose.

    Part of the issue here is research. Extensive safety testing is needed to work out whether high doses of any food or supplement is safe.

    Right now, there is little safety evidence for pregnant or breastfeeding women, to the extent that such women should avoid high doses of garlic and garlic supplements.

    It Gives You Bad Breath

    This one isn’t really a risk, per se, but garlic breath is a well-known risk of eating garlic. Your breath won’t be too bad if you use garlic as an ingredient.

    But, if you’re eating raw garlic, you might be very difficult to be around.

    Can You Eat Raw Garlic?

    Most of us cook garlic before we use it – with good reason too, as raw garlic has a strong flavor and intense smell. The idea of consuming it raw may sound overwhelming, to say the least.

    Yet, raw garlic is safe to eat. It may even be healthier than the cooked version, as some of the allicin in garlic gets destroyed during the cooking.

    Of course, you’re likely to get intense garlic breath for a while after eating a raw garlic clove. Side effects could be more significant too, including heartburn, gas, and burning inside your mouth.

    To make raw garlic easier to eat, try including it in a recipe, like homemade salsa, salad dressing, or garlic butter. Crushing the garlic can be helpful too, as this gives you the most allicin.

    Is Black Garlic Healthy?

    A bowl filled with black garlic. One of the garlic bulbs has been cut open so we can see the black garlic cloves

    Black garlic is an interesting alternative. This is fresh garlic that has been heated slowly in high humidity. The process turns the garlic black, while also making it sweeter than regular garlic, with a softer and chewier texture.

    Black garlic does contain less allicin than regular garlic, which does decrease some of the potential benefits. However, containing less allicin could mean fewer side effects too.

    What black garlic loses in terms of allicin it makes up for in other areas, as the garlic is high in antioxidants and contains some interesting compounds. It’s even been linked to a variety of benefits, like helping with blood sugar levels, decreasing cholesterol, and lowering triglyceride levels.

    How Much Garlic Should You Consume?

    If you’re not sensitive to garlic and don’t experience significant side effects, then 1 to 2 cloves of garlic per day may be the optimal amount.

    This should give you some benefits, without putting you at risk.

    However, this still puts you well under the allicin doses used in some studies. You might need to eat 4 cloves of garlic per day to hit those doses.

    If you do so, remember that the studies focused on the safety profile for garlic supplements, rather than for garlic itself. There’s little information about the safety of large quantities of fresh garlic every day.  

    What About Supplements And Extracts?

    If you don’t like the flavor of garlic, allicin supplements or garlic extract may seem more appealing. These products aim to give you all the benefits of garlic, without the hassle of dealing with garlic cloves.

    You may also get more allicin per serving with supplements than from garlic itself, which may increase the potential health benefits. Besides, many of the studies into garlic have focused on aged garlic extracts or supplements, rather than garlic itself.

    While this idea has some advantages, there are extra risks to think about too. After all, you don’t really know whether the pill you’re taking contains what the label says it does. You have to trust the company’s claims and not all companies are honest.

    The supplement you choose might be poorly made or contain less allicin than the label suggests. There’s even the risk of contamination. 

    The limited regulation in the supplement industry makes it even more difficult to work out when a product is worth using and when it isn’t. Look for brands that are up-front about their quality processes and use third-party testing. These should provide the most reliable products.

    Finally, the best supplements will have some type of enteric coating. This coating ensures that the pills dissolve in your intestines, rather than your stomach.

    Final Thoughts

    Many purple and white garlic cloves with their stems and roots still attached

    Garlic is a useful ingredient, with a long history in traditional medicine. Even so, we know surprisingly little about its effects on health. Many of the proposed benefits, like decreased blood pressure and improved immune system function, have largely been shown for supplements and not for garlic itself.

    There are also some significant risks to think about, including how garlic interacts with medications, increases bleeding, and can cause side effects – especially when the dose is high.

    The current balance of evidence suggests that using garlic in your cooking is safe. You’ll avoid most of the serious side effects this way and might even see some benefits.

    On the other hand, high doses of garlic (whether through supplements or garlic itself) come with many more risks and the benefits are questionable, at best. Honestly, it’s better to take the classic approach and let food be thy medicine. Rather than going overboard with garlic, why not include a variety of spices in your diet, along with fresh fruit, veggies, whole grains, and legumes?

    Filed Under: Health + WellnessTagged With: Garlic

    Источник: https://foodfornet.com/garlic-good-you/
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    Food, Nutrition and Diet

    Elizabeth Beasley

    Elizabeth has been writing for Healthgrades since 2014 and specializes in articles about alternative and complementary therapies like meditation, yoga, energy work and aromatherapy. She also performs improv comedy and is a firm believer that laughter really is the best medicine.

    Medical Reviewer: William C. Lloyd III, MD, FACS

    Last Review Date: 2020 Sep 19

    View All Food, Nutrition and Diet Articles

    THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for informational purposes only. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

    Источник: https://www.healthgrades.com/right-care/food-nutrition-and-diet/8-surprising-health-benefits-of-garlic
    Foodal.com">
    Roasted Garlic Spread

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    ServingsPrep Time
    2people10minutes
    ServingsPrep Time
    2people10minutes

    Ingredients

    • 2bulbsgarlic
    • aluminum foil
    • 1/4cupParmesan cheeseoptional
    • 1/4tspndry mustard powderoptional
    • 1tspnItalian seasoningoptional

    Servings: people

    Units:

    Instructions

    1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees

    2. Peel two garlic bulbs and remove the bottoms before placing them in a small, aluminum, oven safe pan (I actually prefer muffin tins)

    3. Add 1 1/2 t. of olive oil, a pinch of salt and seal tightly with aluminum foil (you can actually place the garlic on a foil square, then wrap your garlic and oil into a Hershey Kiss like container). Note, you'll need to poke a few holes in the top to allow the steam to escape.

    4. Roast garlic for 15 minutes and remove from oven

    5. Add other ingredients (personal preference/ not necessary), then smash garlic with fork until you have attained your desired consistency.

    6. Other ingredients might include; Parmesan cheese, dry mustard, or a mix of Italian seasonings

    Recipe Notes

    Rosted Garlic Spread on French bread

     

    Rich in essential oils, the compound allicin is garlic’s active agent. Allicin is responsible for the bulb’s odiferous scent, and a number of its healing properties.

    Garlic is also a great source of selenium (beneficial to the reproductive system and thyroid), B vitamins, manganese (for bone health, collagen production, and blood sugar control), and calcium.

    The essential oils in garlic are reputed to include strong antiviral, antifungal, and antiseptic properties, and are widely used for the treatment of colds and bronchitis.

    Homemade honey-garlic infusions consisting of one scant drop of essential oil mixed with one cup of honey can help to alleviate the symptoms of colds, sore throats, and laryngitis.

    Pregnant women and nursing mothers should not use this infusion, and essential oils should only be used in a well-ventilated area.

    And if you are following a low FODMAP diet, garlic should not be consumed, as it is a type of pungent oligosaccharide.

    Garlic has a naturally pungent odor. Its essential oil is indescribable and quickly fills the room, and the scent is not a pleasant one. Use caution… and open the windows!

    The Cooking and Health Benefits of Garlic - Foodal.com

    If you are not adventurous enough to grow your own garlic (alas, I am not), be careful to choose only solid, taut bulbs when shopping. The outer skin of the bulb should be firm, white in color (sometimes a hint of violet will be present), and unbroken.

    Stay away from bulbs that are soft to the touch or that contain dark spots. You might want to think twice about buying garlic in beautifully braided strands.

    They are admittedly beautiful to look at, but it is doubtful that you will get anywhere near using them all before they have spoiled. But if you are only in the market for an attractive kitchen accessory, or if you do cook with a lot of garlic (garlic soup, anyone?) feel free, as they do make an attractive presentation.

    On a closing note, it is important to remember that garlic loses its antibacterial properties when it has been aged or cooked. To maximize the health benefits, chop raw garlic cloves into miniscule pieces and add to a favorite salad.

    Let’s face it, garlic makes a tasty addition to everything from sauces and pasta to marinades and scrambled eggs. The trick to reaping as many benefits as possible is to toss it into the mix at the latest possible moment. Bon appetit!

    So you grow your own kitchen garden? If so, you need to check our our garlic growing guide over at our sister site, Gardener’s Path. And be sure to check out Foodal’s Ultimate Guide to Herbs and Spices for more culinary ideas.

    Sources:

    The Complete Guide to Natural Healing . Orangeville, ON: International Masters 

    Altshul, Sara. CNN . Cable News Network, 13 Nov. 2009. Web. 29 May 2014. 

    “Growing Garlic.” : Organic Garlic Seed Farm, Serving the Organic Farming Community . N.p., n.d. Web. 30 May 2014.

    The staff at Foodal are not medical professionals and this article should not be construed as medical advice. Foodal and Ask the Experts, LLC assume no liability for the use or misuse of the material presented above. Always consult with a medical professional before changing your diet or using supplements or manufactured or natural medications.

    Photo credits: Shutterstock.

    More of Our Expert Guides

    Horizontal image of a bowlful of whole spices.
    Horizontal image of a gray bowl filled with a deep orange powdery mixture on a wooden table next to spoons with spices, a plate of fresh ginger, and a bowl with whole peppercorns.
    Источник: https://foodal.com/knowledge/herbs-spices/cooking-health-benefits-garlic/

    Do you know the benefits of swallowing garlic cloves?

    Garlic is not only useful in cooking, it contains many health benefits.  Swallowing raw garlic has been found more beneficial than cooked garlic.  Garlic contains amounts of vitamin C, A, E and folate.  These antioxidants destroy free radicals that can damage cell membrane.  Garlic also gives you 10 percent of your recommended daily intake of manganese.
    swallowing garlic cloves
    Garlic is an anti-fungal.  This means it can reduce fungal infections.  Garlic can also boost your immune due to the antiviral and antibacterial properties.  Swallowing a piece of garlic clove is a great way to naturally help your body rid seasonal threats.  An old folk remedy is to chew a clove of garlic dipped in honey at the first sign of seasonal threats.
    According to NCBI, chewing the clove before swallowing is more beneficial.   Chewing has been shown to lower cholesterol and stabilize blood pressure. Once cut, the active compound loses potency within an hour.  So it’s best to press the garlic and swallow immediately.
    Ways to swallow garlic cloves:

    1. Crush a clove and combine it with honey and lemon essential oil to make your own homemade syrup.  
    2. Butter a piece of toast with a  sprinkle of crushed garlic.
    3. Crush a small piece from a clove and swallow with water.
    4. Make homemade salad dressing adding crushed garlic.

    According to Natural Blaze:  it is recommended that adults consume no more than 1 clove 2-3x a day.  Children 1/2 clove, 2x a day.  It’s best to take on an empty stomach.  If you are on medications, consult your doctor.
    Other resources:

    Learn More

    If you are interested, make sure to check out the food section on Amazon for any great deals.

    AuthorEyerly Family

    The Eyerly Family is a tight knit family from Texas. Married for 10 years Dane and Deena are the parents to six awesome kids! In 2021 the Eyerly's are leaving normal life behind to travel full-time throughout the United States in their Double Decker Bus which has been converted to a tiny home. They've been featured in Yahoo! News, Yahoo! Finance, Yahoo! Style, Medium, and Latestly. Learn more about The Eyerly's here.

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    Источник: https://dbldkr.com/swallowing-garlic-cloves/

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    Garlic has been part of the kitchens for centuries. This herb has curative and medicinal properties because of its antibacterial and antiseptic nature. The beneficial properties of garlic are because of a compound, Allicin. It is rich in minerals like phosphorus, zinc, potassium, and magnesium. Vitamins C, K, Folate, niacin and thiamine also are found abundantly in garlic.

    The Health Benefits of Eating Garlic are:

    Wards Off Cough and Cold

    Raw garlic has the potential to ward off cough and cold infections. Eating two crushed garlic cloves on an empty stomach has the maximum benefit. For kids and babies, hanging garlic cloves in a thread around their necks is supposed to relieve congestion symptoms.

    Good for Cardiac Health

    Allicin, a compound found in garlic stops the oxidizing of LDL (bad cholesterol). This reduces cholesterol levels and improves heart health. Regular consumption of garlic reduces the incidence of blood clots and thus helps prevent thromboembolism. Garlic also lowers blood pressure so is good for patients with hypertension. Read more on how to control high blood pressure.

    Also Read: 2o Essential tips for a Healthy Heart

    Improves Brain Functioning

    Garlic promotes brain health because of its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. It is effective against neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer’s and dementia. Also, read more on the best brain foods to include in your diet.

    Improves Digestion

    Digestive problems improve with the inclusion of raw garlic in the diet. It benefits the intestines and reduces inflammation. Eating raw garlic helps to clear out intestinal worms. The good thing is that it destroys the bad bacteria and protects the good bacteria in the gut.

    Balances Blood Sugar

    Those who suffer from diabetes observe their blood sugar levels regulating the consumption of raw garlic. Also, read 10 harmful effects of sugar.

    Boosts Immunity

    Garlic protects against free radicals and prevents damage to the DNA. Zinc in garlic promotes immunity. Vitamin C helps to fight off infections. It is very beneficial against eye and ear infections as it has antimicrobial properties.

    Improves Skin Health

    Garlic helps prevent acne and lightens acne scars. Cold sores, psoriasis, rashes, and blisters can all benefit from the application of garlic juice. It also protects against UV rays and therefore prevents ageing.

    Read More: 7 Home Remedies for Glowing Skin

    Prevents Cancer and Peptic Ulcer

    Because of a high amount of antioxidants, garlic protects the body against lung, prostate, bladder, stomach, liver and colon cancer. The antibacterial action of garlic prevents peptic ulcers as it eliminates the contagion from the gut.

    Good for Weight Loss

    Garlic reduces the expression of genes responsible for the formation of adipose cells which store fat. It also increases thermogenesis in the body and leads to the burning of more fat and the lowering of LDL (bad cholesterol).

    garlic benefits

    Fights UTI and Improves Renal Health

    Fresh garlic juice has the potential to reduce the growth of E. Coli bacteria that cause urinary tract infection (UTI). It also helps prevent kidney infections.

    Garlic reduces infections on wounds, promotes hair growth, bone health and liver health. Most of the home remedies are effective only if garlic is consumed raw.

    Reduces Exercise Fatigue

    According to studies from Japan, raw garlic when aged in a mixture of water and alcohol may have significant effects on exercise endurance. Human studies have also been conducted that have shown that garlic can indeed improve the symptoms of exercise fatigue. 

    Reduces Blood Toxicity

    For people who are susceptible to lead poisoning due to occupational hazards, garlic may be the best organic solution. Studies conducted in 2012 have revealed that garlic is in fact, safer and better at reducing lead poisoning of the blood than d-Penicillamine, which is the common drug used to treat the same.

    Overcome Oestrogen Deficiency

    The period of menopause for older women has often been associated with a lack of the female hormone known as oestrogen due to irregular production of a protein known as a cytokine. Consumption of garlic has been seen to regulate this to some extent and therefore, may be effective in overcoming oestrogen deficiency after menopause.

    Reduce Effects or Onset of Osteoarthritis

    Consuming garlic in your regular diet can also help to prevent or reduce the onset of osteoarthritis. Research has shown that garlic contains a compound known as diallyl disulphide which helps to maintain bone density and therefore can potentially delay the onset of bone-related ailments like osteoarthritis.

    Prevent Heart Blockages

    Garlic is also believed to help reduce the stickiness of the platelets in your blood. These platelets are responsible for the clotting of blood. Consuming a healthy dose of garlic can help reduce the excessive clotting effect of platelets on the blood. Therefore, it may help prevent unnecessary blood clots inside arteries that may reach up to your heart causing a heart attack.

    Also Read: 10 Health Benefits of Turmeric

    Disclaimer: The information included at this site is for educational purposes only and is not intended to be a substitute for medical treatment by a health care professional. Because of unique individual needs, the reader should consult their physician to determine the appropriateness of the information for the reader’s situation.

    Источник: https://pharmeasy.in/blog/top-10-health-benefits-of-garlic/

    Men and women generally agree, garlic on the breath isn't pleasant. But according to a new study, men who eat garlic actually smell more pleasant and attractive to the opposite sex—not their breath, but their body odor. And if that finding isn’t counter-intuitive enough, it’s made all the stranger by the fact that only men in the study who consumed a lot of garlic—the equivalent of four bulbs a day—enjoyed the effect.

    The study had three phases in which the amount and type (bulbs or capsules) of garlic given to 42 male participants were varied. The researchers collected their body odor with pads worn for 12 hours, which were subsequently sniffed by 82 women who rated their pleasantness, attractiveness and intensity.

    In the first phase, the men ate 6 grams of garlic (about two cloves worth) with bread and cheese. The women who sniffed their pads didn’t rate their odor any differently than they rated the odor of men who ate only bread and cheese. In the next phase researchers doubled the amount to 12 grams, or four cloves. In this case the women judged the odor as significantly more pleasant, attractive and less intense than the non-garlic odor. In the final phase the men consumed 12 grams in capsules and the women again rated their odor as more attractive and less intense.

    The results suggest that something about garlic in body odor is attractive to the opposite sex, but what and why? While the study doesn’t provide solid answers, the researchers speculate that the health-boosting benefits of eating garlic may be discernable in body odor, producing an olfactory marker of good health for the opposite sex to home in on.

    According to study co-author Craig Roberts, Professor of Psychology at the University of Stirling, UK, “From an evolutionary perspective, formation of preferences for diet-associated body odors was possibly shaped by means of sexual selection. Previous research indicates that many animal species use diet-associated cues to select mates in good physical condition.”

    Again, this is speculative, but there’s decent evidence linking garlic to a few notable health boosts, and it’s conceivable that one or more of them could be identifiable in human sweat.

    Roberts adds, “As the health benefits of garlic consumption include antioxidant, immunostimulant, cardiovascular, bactericidal and anti-cancer effects, it is plausible that human odor preferences have been shaped by sexual selection.”

    Or it’s possible that once garlic is digested, it simply produces a chemical reaction evidenced in male sweat that is, for whatever reason, appealing to women. At least some women.

    Either way, the results are intriguing and eating more garlic from a health standpoint isn't a bad idea, side benefits notwithstanding.

    The study will be published in the journal Appetite.

    You can find David DiSalvo on Twitter @neuronarrative and at his website daviddisalvo.org.

     

    Источник: https://www.forbes.com/sites/daviddisalvo/2015/11/15/men-who-eat-garlic-make-women-take-notice-in-a-good-way/
    Foodal.com">
    Roasted Garlic Spread

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    Servings: people

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    Instructions

    1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees

    2. Peel two garlic bulbs and remove the bottoms before placing them in a small, aluminum, oven safe pan (I actually prefer muffin tins)

    3. Add 1 1/2 t. of olive oil, a pinch of salt and seal tightly with aluminum foil (you can actually place the garlic on a foil square, then wrap your garlic and oil into a Hershey Kiss like container). Note, you'll need to poke a few holes in the top to allow the steam to escape.

    4. Roast garlic for 15 minutes and remove from oven

    5. Add other ingredients (personal preference/ not necessary), then smash garlic with fork until you have attained your desired consistency.

    6. Other ingredients might include; Parmesan cheese, dry mustard, or a mix of Italian seasonings

    Recipe Notes

    Rosted Garlic Spread on French bread

     

    Rich in essential oils, the compound allicin is garlic’s active agent. Allicin is responsible for the bulb’s odiferous scent, and a number of its healing properties.

    Garlic is also a is eating garlic cloves good for you source of selenium (beneficial to the reproductive system and thyroid), B vitamins, manganese (for bone health, collagen production, and blood sugar control), and calcium.

    The essential oils in garlic are reputed to include strong antiviral, antifungal, and antiseptic properties, and are widely used for the treatment of colds and bronchitis.

    Homemade honey-garlic infusions consisting of one scant drop of essential oil mixed with one cup of honey can help to alleviate the symptoms of colds, sore throats, and laryngitis.

    Pregnant women and nursing mothers should not use this infusion, and essential oils should only be used in a well-ventilated area.

    And if you are following a low FODMAP diet, garlic should not be consumed, as it is a type of pungent oligosaccharide.

    Garlic has a naturally pungent odor. Its essential oil is indescribable is eating garlic cloves good for you quickly fills the room, and the scent is not a pleasant one. Use caution… and open the windows!

    The Cooking and Health Is eating garlic cloves good for you of Garlic - Foodal.com

    If you are not adventurous enough to grow your own garlic (alas, I am not), be careful to choose only solid, taut bulbs when shopping. The outer skin of the bulb should be firm, white in color (sometimes a hint of violet will be present), and unbroken.

    Stay away from bulbs that are soft to the touch or that contain dark spots. You might want to is eating garlic cloves good for you twice about buying garlic in beautifully braided strands.

    They are admittedly beautiful to look at, but it is doubtful that you will get anywhere near using them all before they have spoiled. But if you are only in the market for an attractive kitchen accessory, or if you do cook with a lot of garlic (garlic soup, anyone?) feel free, as they do make an attractive presentation.

    On a closing note, it is important to remember that garlic loses its antibacterial properties when it has been aged or cooked. To maximize the health benefits, chop raw garlic cloves into miniscule pieces and add to a favorite salad.

    Let’s face it, garlic makes a tasty addition to everything from sauces and pasta to marinades and scrambled eggs. The trick to reaping as many benefits as possible is to toss it into the mix at the latest possible moment. Bon appetit!

    So you grow your own kitchen garden? If so, you need to check our our garlic growing guide over at our sister site, Gardener’s Path. And be sure to check out Foodal’s Ultimate Guide to Herbs and Spices for more culinary ideas.

    Sources:

    The Complete Guide to Natural Healing . Orangeville, ON: International Masters 

    Altshul, Sara. CNN . Cable News Network, 13 Nov. 2009. Web. 29 May 2014. 

    “Growing Garlic.” : Organic Garlic Seed Farm, Serving the Organic Farming Community . N.p., n.d. Web. 30 May 2014.

    The staff at Foodal are not medical professionals and this article should not be construed as medical advice. Foodal and Ask the Experts, LLC assume no liability for the use or misuse of the material presented above. Always consult with a medical professional before changing your diet or using supplements or manufactured or natural medications.

    Photo credits: Shutterstock.

    More of Our Expert Guides

    Horizontal image of a bowlful of whole spices.
    Horizontal image of a gray bowl filled with a deep orange powdery mixture on a wooden table next to spoons with spices, a plate of fresh ginger, and a bowl with whole peppercorns.
    Источник: https://foodal.com/knowledge/herbs-spices/cooking-health-benefits-garlic/ Last updated on - May 28, 2018, 17:49 ISTShare is eating garlic cloves good for you fbsharetwsharepinshare

    01/11Side-effects of eating too much garlic!

    Side-effects of eating too much garlic!

    Have you ever thought, garlic can cause serious health problems too? Garlic is a common cooking ingredient used in every Indian household to enhance the flavour of food. It is used as a medicine for treating various health problems. Having raw garlic or consuming too much of garlic can have life-threatening side effects on the body. Read to know more.

    readmore

    02/11Bad for liver

    Bad for liver

    The liver is a vital organ of our body as it performs various functions like blood purification, fat metabolism, protein metabolism and removing ammonia from our body. According to several studies, it is found that garlic is loaded with a compound called allicin, which can cause liver toxicity if taken in large quantities.

    readmore

    03/11Diarrhea

    Diarrhea

    Consuming garlic on an empty stomach can cause diarrhea. Garlic has gas-forming compounds like sulfur that plays an important role in triggering diarrhea.

    readmore

    04/11Nausea, vomiting and heartburn

    Nausea, vomiting and heartburn

    According to a report published by the National Cancer Institute of U.S, consuming fresh garlic on an empty stomach could lead to heartburn, nausea and vomiting. As per a report published by the Harvard Medical School, garlic contains certain compounds that can cause GERD (gastroesophageal reflux disease).

    readmore

    05/11Bad odor

    Bad odor

    Garlic can lead to bad breath, if consumed in excess. The main reason for the cause of bad breath is the sulfur compound present in it.

    readmore

    06/11Aggravates bleeding

    Aggravates bleeding

    Garlic is a natural blood thinner, so we shouldn't consume large quantities of garlic along with blood-thinning medicines like warfarin, aspirin etc. This is because the combined effect of blood thinning medication and garlic is dangerous, and it may increase the risk of internal bleeding.

    readmore

    07/11Not good for pregnant and nursing women

    Not good for pregnant and nursing women

    Pregnant women or lactating mothers should avoid eating garlic during this period as it may induce labour in pregnant women. Nursing mothers should avoid it as it alters the taste of milk.

    readmore

    08/11Cause dizziness

    Cause dizziness

    According to experts, eating garlic in excess may lower blood pressure and lead to several related symptoms.

    readmore

    09/11Induce sweating

    Induce sweating

    In various clinical studies, consuming garlic for a prolonged time may lead to excessive sweating.

    readmore

    10/11Aggravates vaginal infection

    Aggravates vaginal infection

    Avoid eating garlic for treating vaginal yeast infection as it can aggravate the yeast infection by irritating the tender tissues of the vagina.

    readmore
    Источник: https://recipes.timesofindia.com/articles/health/10-harmful-effects-of-garlic-that-you-should-know/photostory/64355960.cms

    Is Garlic Good For You?

    A selection of garlic heads and some cloves on a wooden table

    Garlic has a long history in traditional medicine and as a way to make our food taste better. Many of us have been eating garlic throughout our lives without any apparent ill effects. For that reason, asking is garlic good for you? might seem like a strange idea indeed.

    However, the question only seems strange because we often get stuck on the idea that anything natural is good for us and anything artificial isn’t. There are plenty of examples of that pattern too, like how leafy greens and spices offer health benefits, while products like Is eating garlic cloves good for you and Ensure use concerning additives.

    Even so, there are many cases where natural foods aren’t as beneficial as they seem. The high oxalate content of spinach, for example, can contribute to kidney stones, while the vitamin K present interacts with blood thinning medications. That’s just one example. There are countless others.  

    Garlic is similar to spinach in that it offers plenty of benefits and has some concerning features as well. Whether it’s a good choice or not strongly depends on your needs and the amount you plan on eating.

    Table of Contents

    Is Garlic Good For Your Health?

    How Garlic Influences Your Health

    A selection of fresh garlic bulbs on the ground, one of which has had its skin removed

    The Allicin

    Garlic is most famous for allicin. This is a defense molecule that’s produced from an interaction between alliin and alliinase. Alliin is an amino acid that’s found in fresh garlic, while alliinase is produced when garlic is chopped or crushed. This reaction is why crushed garlic has a much stronger smell than garlic cloves.

    Allicin itself has been studied in-depth and linked to a variety of benefits. We’ll talk about some of these shortly. You can even find allicin supplements, which give you an easier way to increase your allicin intake.

    However, allicin isn’t a stable compound and quickly breaks down. Allicin also doesn’t survive in garlic once it’s been cooked, potentially making raw garlic the healthiest choice.

    Other Compounds

    Allicin might be the most famous molecule in garlic, but it isn’t the only important one. Other sulfur compounds are present too, ones that have also been linked to health, including s-allyl cysteine and diallyl disulfide.

    Some of these compounds come from pioneer savings bank guilderland ny breaking down. In fact, diallyl trisulfide is the version that you’ll often see in supplements, as allicin itself isn’t stable enough.

    The Nutrients

    There are also some important nutrients in garlic. The main ones are vitamin C, manganese, and selenium, while there are also smaller amounts of copper, iron, potassium, and some B vitamins present.

    Garlic also happens to be nutritionally dense and low in calories, making it an easy way to boost your intake of these vital vitamins and minerals.

    Nutrients all play crucial roles in our bodies, helping everything to function as it should, including our muscles, our organs, and even our blood. While you can find the same nutrients in plenty of other foods, garlic is an easy choice, as you can add it to countless recipes.   

    Don’t forget about the antioxidants either. Antioxidants are common in plant-based foods, helping to protect our bodies and protect us from disease.  

    The Many Is eating garlic cloves good for you Of Garlic

    A glass jar of fermented garlic cloves, next to some pieces of garlic on a wooden table

    Garlic’s benefits have been known throughout history. As far back as Hippocrates, people have been prescribing garlic as a way to treat ailments.

    These days, garlic has been the subject of many studies – and some of the potential benefits have been proven.

    Decreases Cholesterol Levels

    Studies have shown that garlic can lower total cholesterol levels and LDL cholesterol levels, often by between 10% to 15%. This effect is important, as high cholesterol levels are thought to increase your risk of heart disease.

    As such, eating garlic regularly could help to protect your heart. Including garlic as part of a heart-healthy diet is even more powerful.

    Lowers Blood Pressure Too

    Blood pressure is another important area. High blood pressure increases the risk of heart diseases and other health problems.

    Finding where can i donate food for the bahamas ways to decrease blood pressure may be a powerful way to protect health – and garlic could help in this area.

    Most studies on this topic have focused on garlic supplements or aged garlic extract. In some cases, the garlic was as effective as blood pressure medication.

    The catch is that garlic supplements and extracts are more concentrated than regular garlic. You might need as much as 4 cloves of garlic per day to get the same effect (which, honestly, is too much for most of us).

    Improves Your Immune System

    Boosting our immune system can help our body to fight off infection and stay healthier. Researchers often look at this by seeing how a given food or supplement influences the risk of a common condition, like getting a cold or the flu.

    One such study showed that an allicin supplement reduced the likelihood of contracting a cold and improved recovery speed for people who did end up sick. A second study found a similar effect from aged garlic extract.

    Once again, the studies focused on supplements rather than garlic itself. There hasn’t been much evidence either, so more studies are needed before we can be confident.

    Still, you can always experiment for yourself.

    Decreases Oxidative Stress

    Like many foods, garlic is a decent source of antioxidants. These help to protect your body from free radical damage, while reducing your oxidative stress.

    Such effects are thought to improve your health in various ways, like protecting against cognitive decline, cancer, and more.

    Allicin Has Anti-Microbial Effects

    The allicin in your garlic is powerful against various microbes, including those that are resistant to antibiotics. This effect could lead to health benefits too, like helping your body to fight infection or promoting ulcer healing.

    The Risks Of Garlic

    A brown bowl of crushed garlic, in front of a garlic press on a <i>is eating garlic cloves good for you</i> table

    It Can Cause Side Effects

    Garlic doesn’t agree with everyone. Some people experience significant side effects, like gas, heartburn, and diarrhea. There’s also the chance of allergic reactions and an increased risk of bleeding.

    Gastro side effects are particularly common, as some compounds in garlic create gas. These side effects are strongest if you’re eating garlic raw on an empty stomach (which some people do as a way to increase their garlic intake). If you’re sensitive, try using garlic in meals instead.

    Side effects tend to increase with garlic dose as well, meaning that you should be cautious when using garlic supplements.

    Consuming food at the same time as garlic or garlic supplements often helps to reduce the risk of side effects.

    There are also significant side effects from using garlic on your skin, either on its own or as part of a gel or a paste. Some people end up with a sensation that’s similar to a burn, where the garlic may even damage their skin. This use may even be unsafe and is best avoided.

    Garlic Interacts With Some Medications

    There are also significant interactions between garlic and some medications. For example, garlic changes how quickly the body breaks down some HIV/AIDS medications, making the medications less effective.

    Hormonal birth control pills can be affected by garlic as well. This interaction is so significant that you might need a secondary form of birth control.

    Birth control pills and HIV/AIDS medications are just two examples. There are plenty of other times where garlic interacts with medications.

    Such effects mean that anyone going beyond regular dietary intake of garlic should talk to their doctor about possible issues. This is even more true if you’re eating raw garlic, as the allicin content of raw garlic is much higher than with is eating garlic cloves good for you garlic.

    Increases The Risk Of Bleeding

    Garlic also acts as a blood thinner. This can be a problem in multiple situations, like if you are taking blood thinning medication, have blood clotting issues, or need to have some type of surgery.

    The biggest risks come from high doses of garlic. So, having garlic supplements or eating 4 cloves of raw garlic per day, for example, might put your health at risk. Using a clove every so often in cooking isn’t likely to have a big effect.

    That said, if you are worried about bleeding at all, please talk to your doctor. Various foods, conditions, and medications can influence your blood clotting – and it’s always best to be on the safe side.

    High Doses Mightn’t Always Be Safe

    The quantities of garlic that we normally use in food appear to be safe for most people. No surprises there, right? After all, we’ve been using garlic for a long time.

    Problems start to arise when you increase the dose.

    Part of the issue here is research. Extensive safety testing is needed to work out whether high doses of any food or supplement is safe.

    Right now, there is little safety evidence for pregnant or breastfeeding women, to the extent that such women should avoid high doses of garlic and garlic supplements.

    It Gives You Bad Breath

    This one isn’t really a risk, per se, but garlic breath is a well-known risk of eating garlic. Your breath won’t be too bad if you use garlic as an ingredient.

    But, if you’re eating raw garlic, you might be very difficult to be around.

    Can You Eat Raw Garlic?

    Most of us cook garlic before we use it – with good reason too, as is eating garlic cloves good for you garlic has a strong flavor and intense smell. The idea of consuming it raw may sound overwhelming, to say the least.

    Yet, raw garlic is safe to eat. It may even be healthier than the cooked version, as some of the allicin in garlic gets destroyed during the cooking.

    Of course, you’re likely to get intense garlic breath for a while after eating a raw garlic clove. Side effects could be more significant too, including heartburn, gas, and burning inside your mouth.

    To make raw garlic easier to eat, try including it in a recipe, like homemade salsa, salad dressing, or garlic butter. Crushing the garlic can be helpful too, as this gives you the most allicin.

    Is Black Garlic Healthy?

    A bowl filled with black garlic. One of the garlic bulbs has been cut open so we can see the black garlic cloves

    Black garlic is an interesting alternative. This is fresh is eating garlic cloves good for you that has been heated slowly in high humidity. The process turns the garlic black, while also making it sweeter than regular garlic, with a softer and chewier texture.

    Black garlic does contain less allicin than regular garlic, which does decrease some of the potential benefits. However, containing less allicin could mean fewer side effects too.

    What black garlic loses in terms of allicin it makes up for in other areas, as the garlic is high in antioxidants and contains some interesting compounds. It’s even been linked to a variety of benefits, like helping with blood sugar levels, decreasing cholesterol, and lowering triglyceride levels.

    How Much Garlic Should You Consume?

    If you’re not sensitive to garlic and don’t experience significant side effects, then 1 to 2 cloves of garlic per day may be the optimal amount.

    This should give you some benefits, without putting you at risk.

    However, this still puts you well under the allicin doses used in some studies. You might need to eat 4 cloves of garlic per day to hit those doses.

    If you do so, remember that the studies focused on the safety profile for garlic supplements, rather than for garlic itself. There’s little information about the is eating garlic cloves good for you of large quantities of fresh garlic every day.  

    What About Supplements And Extracts?

    If you don’t like the flavor of garlic, allicin supplements or garlic extract may seem more appealing. These products aim to give you all the benefits of garlic, without the hassle of dealing with garlic cloves.

    You may also get more allicin per serving with supplements than from garlic itself, which may increase the potential health benefits. Besides, many of the studies into garlic have focused on aged garlic extracts or supplements, rather than garlic itself.

    While this idea has some advantages, there are extra risks to think about too. After all, you don’t really know whether the pill you’re taking contains what the label says it does. You have to trust the company’s claims and not all companies are honest.

    The supplement you choose might be poorly made or contain less allicin than the label suggests. There’s even the risk of contamination. 

    The limited regulation in the supplement industry makes it even more difficult to work out when a product is worth using and when it isn’t. Look for brands that are up-front about their quality processes and use third-party testing. These should provide the most reliable products.

    Finally, the best supplements will have some type of enteric coating. This coating ensures that the pills dissolve in your intestines, rather than your stomach.

    Final Thoughts

    Many purple and white garlic cloves with their stems and roots still attached

    Garlic is a useful ingredient, with a long history in traditional medicine. Even so, we know surprisingly little about its effects on health. Many of the proposed benefits, like decreased blood pressure and improved immune system function, have largely been shown for supplements and not for garlic itself.

    There are also some significant risks to think about, including how garlic interacts with medications, increases bleeding, and can cause side effects – especially when the dose is high.

    The current balance of evidence suggests that using garlic in your cooking is safe. You’ll avoid most of the serious side effects this way and might even see some benefits.

    On the other hand, high doses of garlic (whether through supplements or garlic itself) come with many more risks and the benefits are questionable, at best. Honestly, it’s better to take the classic approach and let food be thy medicine. Rather than going overboard with garlic, why not include a variety of spices in your diet, along with fresh fruit, veggies, whole grains, and legumes?

    Filed Under: Health + WellnessTagged With: Garlic

    Источник: https://foodfornet.com/garlic-good-you/
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    Roasted Garlic Spread

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    Roasted Garlic Spread with a dash of dry mustard
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    Posted by: | on October 2, 2012
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    4 Comments to Is eating garlic cloves good for you

    1. AGS Beauty - AGS Salon Equipment Yes, I guess I need to apply for a different card. Thank you for your response. More power! 👍

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