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    Is caffeinated coffee good for you


    is caffeinated coffee good for you

    Should you drink tea or coffee? Coffee gives you a quicker buzz, but tea provides more sustained energy · Tea and coffee are both good sources of. While decaffeinated and caffeinated coffee contain many of the same beneficial compounds and antioxidants that boost health, a majority of the studies on. Is coffee bad for you? Regular coffee is not bad for you and may offer substantial health benefits. 1-4 cups per day are considered safe and beneficial for.

    Is caffeinated coffee good for you -

    How high is too high? "Research shows that for most healthy people, consumption of up to 400mg of caffeine per day is safe," says Sarah Rueven, RD, MS, CDN, founder of Rooted Wellness. "This equates to about two to three cups of coffee. However, the caffeine content of coffee varies greatly depending on the source of the bean and preparation method." For someone with a mild habit, that sounds reasonable enough. But for someone with a more extreme consumption habit, well that's a different story.

    To get back to basics, you might be wondering what exactly caffeine does to your body to help you stay alert when you're running on three hours of sleep. First off, how you're affected by caffeine can depend on age and genetics, which will determine how your body absorbs and metabolizes it.

    "Caffeine enters the bloodstream and works as a stimulant as it binds to adenosine receptors in the brain," says Yasi Ansari, MS, RD, CSSD, a national spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. "Adenosine is a nervous system depressant. It promotes sleep controls and can affect memory and learning. When caffeine binds to these receptors, adenosine's effects are lessened and the body is instead stimulated; then it increases adrenaline, which gives the body a boost of energy!"

    And energy isn't the only benefit of caffeine, the experts shared what you can feel good about when sipping your cup of joe (or tea):

    Источник: https://thethirty.whowhatwear.com/is-caffeine-bad-for-you

    Is Drinking Decaf Coffee Better for You?

    So you want to cut back on coffee. Maybe it’s because you want a better night of sleep or jitter- and crash-free days, or perhaps you’ve even heard that coffee may cause cancer. (Don’t worry: That’s highly unlikely.)

    No matter the reason, it’s not uncommon to consider cutting back. After all, we drink a lot of it.

    One study found that 64 percent of Americans drink a cup of coffee every day (the highest percentage to date), with another finding that Americans spend an average of $1,100 on coffee a year.

    But breaking up is hard. And for every counterpoint, there seem to be countless health benefits to sipping the good stuff. If only a caffeine-free, coffee-like substitute existed… oh wait, it does.

    What is decaf coffee?

    Decaffeinated coffee — known to most as “decaf” — isn’t just a regular coffee, it’s a cool coffee. And by cool, we mean it cools it when it comes to caffeine.

    But don’t let the name fool you. Though decaffeinated suggests that it’s devoid of caffeine, most decaf brews actually do contain some buzz. Just how much, exactly, can be a little unclear.

    Because the U.S. Food and Drug Administration doesn’t have strict regulations around decaf, it can be difficult to know exactly what you’re getting in each cup.

    Not to mention, the quality of the bean and processing methods can affect caffeine levels, which is why one brand of coffee may leave you feeling even-keeled while another sends you soaring through the roof.

    What we do know is that the decaffeination process typically removes around 97 percent of the caffeine and that, on average, decaf coffee has 3 milligrams of caffeine per cup compared to the 85 milligrams in a regular cup of coffee — which is a considerable amount if you’re sensitive to caffeine.

    How it’s made

    It’s believed that decaf coffee was discovered in the 1900s when a shipment of coffee beans was soaked in seawater during transit, which naturally extracted some of the caffeine.

    Shortly after, the merchant who happened upon the mishap recreated these magic beans using a chemical solvent called benzene, an ingredient that is a major component of gasoline and also found in volcanoes. (Talk about intense.)

    The good news is: Decaffeinating coffee beans has gotten a lot safer and is no longer carcinogenic (bye, benzene). The less good news: Chemicals aren’t fully out of the picture.

    The decaffeination process starts with unroasted beans (fun fact: the beans are green pre-roasting), which are initially soaked in water to dissolve the caffeine. Then, it can follow three primary methods.

    1. First up is the one with those pesky chemicals. Methylene chloride, which is used in paint removers (yikes), or ethyl acetate, which is used in glue and nail polish removers (double yikes), are used to remove the caffeine from the water by either adding them to the mix of coffee and water (the “direct” process) or by removing the water from the beans and then adding them to the water mixture (the “indirect” process). The final step is the same, which is evaporating the water so the flavor remains in the beans.
    2. Another method, called the Swiss Water Process, uses a charcoal filter to remove the caffeine from the water, making it 100-percent chemical-free.
    3. The third process also keeps things chemical-free by using liquid carbon dioxide to dissolve the caffeine.

    Though the latter methods may sound preferable, the amount of chemicals remaining at the end of the first decaffeination method is minimal and has been deemed safe by the FDA.

    No matter your preference, since labels aren’t required to disclose the method used, it’s hard to say what you’re getting — unless you opt for organic, which is solvent-free.

    So, is decaf good for you?

    Whether decaf or regular, coffee is high in antioxidants. And though decaf can have slightly lower amounts of those antioxidants, decaffeinated coffee isn’t devoid of the benefits.

    Whether gulping down caffeine-infused fire or a mellower brew, coffee may help prevent cancer and even type 2 diabetes.

    But that’s not all. Decaf coffee has plenty of positive attributes, a few of which are due to its lower levels of caffeine:

    • Decaf coffee consumption in one study showed a decreased risk of developing rectal cancer.
    • A study on rats (yeah, we’re waiting for the proof on humans) showed that rodents who were supplemented with coffee performed better in cognition-related tasks than those without, suggesting that coffee may reduce age-related mental decline—no matter the caffeine contents.
    • Consumption of both decaf and caffeinated coffee has been shown to protect neurons in the brain and may help prevent diseases like Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s.
    • Decaf coffee may lower mortality thanks to its positive effect on risk factors like inflammation and depression.

    But is it *better* for you?


    Regular coffee certainly has a longer list of health benefits, but that doesn’t necessarily mean it’s healthier.

    On one hand, there’s the argument that because caffeinated coffee is more widely studied, we know that much more about it, hence all those benefits. But there’s also another key consideration: those who don’t do well with caffeine.

    Many sippers suffer from symptoms like acid reflux, heartburn, and general stomach discomfort after a cup of coffee — not the most pleasant way to start the day.

    But because the decaffeination process can make the coffee milder, decaf may reduce these symptoms, making it a wiser choice for some.

    Caffeine is also responsible for other less-than-stellar side effects, like anxiety, sleeplessness, high blood pressure, and fatigue (3 p.m. crash, we’re looking at you).

    It’s all too easy to forget that caffeine is a drug, and though not as addictive as some of the harder stuff, regular consumption can still lead to cravings and withdrawal symptoms.

    Caffeine can also negatively affect certain medications. However, due to its minimal levels of caffeine, decaf is a much safer choice (though please consult your doctor if you have a medical condition that requires minimizing caffeine consumption).

    The takeaway

    When it comes to coffee, it depends on you and your body’s response to caffeine. If you don’t suffer from side effects, keep calm and coffee on. Just try to limit your caffeine consumption to 400 milligrams per day (3-4 cups, depending on strength).

    If you prefer something milder — both in taste and experience — then opt for decaf. And if ingesting chemicals doesn’t sound all that appealing to you, look for the certified organic seal or ask your local coffee shop if they stock organic or know how their beans are processed.

    The good news is, no matter your preference, you can still enjoy that heavenly taste of coffee. And ain’t that a thing of beauty.

    Источник: https://greatist.com/eat/is-drinking-decaf-coffee-better-for-you

    5 Surprising Health Benefits Of Drinking Hot Coffee Vs. Iced Coffee

    When you're deciding between getting a cup of hot coffee or a cold brew, you may base your decision on your mood or what the weather is like outside. While temperature is an obvious difference between the two, it isn't the only thing. According to experts, there are some surprising differences in the health benefits of drinking hot coffee and iced coffee.

    The benefits of drinking coffee, regardless of temperature, are numerous. When consumed in moderation coffee can help to reduce depression, lower your risk for getting diabetes, improve your workouts, and give your brain a good boost. A 2018 study published in JAMA Internal Medicine, found that drinking coffee can also help you live longer.

    If you have a preference for iced coffees or cold brews, Dr. Maheinthan Yogeswaran, a general practitioner with Medicspot, tells Bustle, there are benefits to drinking it over hot coffee. For instance, iced coffee is known to be less acidic. "This is calmer on your digestive system so you’re less likely to have an upset stomach after drinking your cup of joe cold," Dr. Yogeswaran says. Less acidity is also better for maintaining healthy teeth.

    "Although cold-brewed coffee became a rising star in the health field over the last few years, hot coffee still has some significant advantages," Karin Adoni, certified nutritionist and health coach, tells Bustle. So here are some surprising health benefits of drinking hot coffee versus drinking iced coffee, according to experts.

    1

    Hot Coffee Has More Antioxidants

    In a 2018 study published in Scientific Reports, researchers from Thomas Jefferson University found "chemical differences" between hot and cold brew coffees. Hot coffee was found to have higher levels of antioxidants than cold brew, which makes it slightly more healthy. This is important because antioxidants are responsible for the health benefits you get from coffee. According to Dr. Nikola Djordjevic, MD from DisturbMeNot, the benefits of antioxidants in coffee include a lower risk of cancer, heart disease, liver disease, diabetes, and premature death.

    2

    Cold Brews Generally Have Less Caffeine

    The amount of caffeine in your coffee can vary based on where you're getting your coffee from. "Generally speaking, cold brew contains less caffeine which is a benefit for those who really crave a second cup of coffee but feel a little shaky," Jordan Karcher, coffee expert and founder of Grounds & Hounds Coffee Co., tells Bustle. Cold brews typically contain around 40mg of caffeine per 100g, while hot coffee contains roughly 60mg per 100g of coffee. Benefits of consuming less caffeine include getting better sleep, more balanced hormones in women, and lower blood pressure.

    3

    Hot Coffee Can Put You In A More Pleasant And Generous Mood

    "A cup of hot coffee in the morning may actually put you in a more positive mindset," Adoni says. In fact, a 2009 study published in the journal Science found that experiencing physical warmth, like holding a cup of hot coffee, can increase feelings of interpersonal warmth. In a series of studies, researchers split participants in two groups. One group was told to briefly hold a cup of hot coffee, while the other held iced coffee. Participants who held a cup of hot coffee were more likely to see others as being generous, caring, and warm. They were also more likely to choose a gift for their friend over themselves.

    4

    Iced Coffee Can Help To Prevent A Heart Attack

    Coffee can be very beneficial to your health because it's a good source of antioxidants, which helps to protect you from many diseases. But iced coffee is especially helpful in protecting you against heart attacks. As Dr. Yogeswaran says, "Iced coffee is surprisingly helpful as it contains compounds such as caffeine, magnesium, trigonelline and phenolic compounds that can work by both stabilizing your blood pressure, increasing insulin sensitivity and lowering blood pressure." A 2017 University of Colorado study found that drinking coffee every week — no matter what temperature — can help to reduce your chances of getting a heart attack by 7%.

    5

    A Whiff Of Hot Coffee In The Morning Can Wake You Up And Make You Feel Less Stressed

    Sometimes you don't even need to drink coffee in order to receive its benefits. A 2008 study published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistryfound that the aroma of coffee can alter the activity of certain genes in the brain. In a study of sleep deprived lab rats, researchers found different gene expressions between rats that were able to sniff the coffee and those that didn't. As it was found, just one whiff of hot coffee was enough to reduce the effects of sleep deprivation like stress and tiredness. More research needs to be done to make any conclusions on the effects of coffee aroma on humans.

    In general, coffee in moderation can be good for you so it doesn't really matter which type of coffee you choose to drink. Both hot coffee and iced coffee have their share of health benefits. These are just a few notable differences to be aware of.

    Источник: https://www.bustle.com/p/5-health-benefits-of-drinking-coffee-hot-vs-iced-18161107

    Simple ways to make your coffee healthier

    From that first cup in the morning to the occasional afternoon treat, coffee is a beloved and popular drink. In fact, Americans now drink more coffee than ever. Coffee consumption is up by 5% since 2015 — and 62% of Americans drink coffee every day.1 Its popularity has even spilled into internet culture with the trendy saying, “But first, coffee.”

    Drinking coffee and tea has also been linked to a range of health benefits for the brain, lungs, liver, metabolism, and more.2 But what happens when we add too much milk, cream, or sweetener? A coffee drink loaded with sugar and calories can turn into an unhealthy beverage choice. The good news is you can still have your coffee and make it healthy.

    To help get new ideas brewing, Sean Hashmi, MD, physician and regional director of weight management and clinical nutrition for Kaiser Permanente Southern California, shares these recommendations on how to drink your coffee — and feel good about it.

    Drink it black

    The healthiest way to drink coffee is plain with nothing added — also known as drinking it black. Dr. Hashmi explains, “Ideally, you shouldn’t put sugar in your coffee. If you train your taste buds to have your coffee sweetened, you’ll crave that sweetness like an addiction.” We know that when it comes to sugar and sweeteners, less is always best.

    Try plant-based milks

    If you’re adding milk to your coffee, unsweetened plant-based milks usually have less sugar than regular cow’s milk. “Replacing dairy milk with a nut-based milk is a healthy habit that can reduce saturated fats than can cause issues like heart disease and diabetes,” says Dr. Hashmi.

    Spice it up

    There are some spices like cinnamon, nutmeg, cacao, and ginger that have a natural sweetness and flavor to them. You can add them to your coffee grounds before brewing or sprinkle them directly in your cup for a change of taste. For another buzz-worthy recipe, try making your own cold brew coffee. Brewing at a lower temperature can give you a smooth coffee that’s lower in acidity and bitterness.

    Consider the caffeine

    The maximum recommended amount of caffeine per day is 400 milligrams, which is about 4 cups of brewed coffee. So, if you’re drinking more than 4 cups of coffee per day, you should try a combination of caffeinated and decaffeinated. Keep in mind some coffee shop drinks have more than 1 cup per serving, depending on the size. Dr. Hashmi says, “It’s also a good idea to avoid caffeinated beverages after 10 a.m. Consuming caffeine throughout the day can lead to a jittery feeling or sleep issues at night.”

    Be good to your body

    Dr. Hashmi explains, “There are many benefits to drinking coffee, but you have to be mindful about how you drink it. When it comes to nutrition, I like to think that what you put in your body must have a good ROI (return on investment). If you don’t get anything nutritious out of it, it’s not worth your time.”

     

    1“NCA Releases Atlas of American Coffee,” National Coffee Association, ncausa.org, March 26, 2020.

    2Rob M. van Dam, PhD, et al., “Coffee, Caffeine, and Health,” The New England Journal of Medicine, July 23, 2020.

    Healthy living to help you thrive

    We have many programs to help you create healthy habits. For more information on healthy living and eating habits, explore our healthy lifestyle programs.

    Источник: https://thrive.kaiserpermanente.org/thrive-together/eat-healthy/simple-ways-make-your-coffee-healthier

    01 Dec 2019

    Increasingly, we see headlines about the positive health effects of coffee. This seems to be a huge swing away from a couple of decades ago where coffee seemed to be bad for us and was blamed for interrupting our sleep and making our hearts pound in a bad way. So, what has brought about this change in thinking?

    One reason is that the way coffee is made in some countries has changed. Some of the original research focussed on coffee, once popular in Sweden, which was made by boiling ground coffee. This type of filtered coffee has been associated with increased risk of heart disease, but it’s not seen where the coffee isn’t boiled and is filtered. The reason for this is not entirely clear, but some studies have suggested that unusual types of fat in the coffee can alter how our bodies make and use fats and cholesterol. In theory, this could increase risk of heart disease. In addition, this type of coffee has become less popular with the rise of people drinking other types of coffee such as espresso.  

    Different countries, different coffees?

    Coffee is not the same world over and it’s unlikely that the coffee in many of the studies carried out around the world are the same as the one served in your local coffee shop such as the salted caramel latte with extra whipped cream and sprinkles! In a recent analysis of a Greek population, we attempted at least to see if a research group I am involved in could standardise the coffee drunk in Greece so that the results could be compared to those in the rest of the world. This wasn’t a simple task, as it may not be the same drink, even before the milk and extras are added. The good news is that it was found that it doesn’t have to be a posh fresh coffee to suggest health benefits, instant coffee seems to be just the same as fresh, with or without caffeine.

    Be wary of the caffeine

    Until recently, most of the focus on coffee has been about the caffeine it contains. The average cup of coffee contains about 90mg of the stuff (depending on the type of coffee and how it’s made). A double espresso, the typical base for many coffee shop coffees, will contain about 125mg and the more shots you have in your coffee means that you will get more caffeine.

    Health organisations around the world suggest that most people can safely consume up to 300mg of caffeine a day. Some people are advised to consume less though. The NHS suggests that pregnant women consume no more than 200mg, or 2 cups, of caffeinated coffee a day. This is because studies have linked caffeine intake (not coffee intake) with low birth weight babies. Pregnancy aside, the safe limits are set because research has linked intakes of over 600mg a day to insomnia, nervousness, irritability, increased blood pressure and upset stomachs, although response to caffeine varies hugely from person to person.

    While caffeine is perhaps the most socially accepted psychoactive drug around, with an ability to increase alertness and aid energy release, especially from fats in exercise, it’s probably not the only or main substance in coffee linked to improved health.

    Coffee is a rich source of potassium and is linked to lower blood pressure. Having said that, people with kidney disease may need to lay off the coffee - especially as many people add milk which increases the potassium content even more. What might also be a surprise is that a cup of coffee can contain as much as half a gram of fibre! The fibre found in coffee is different to the type of fibre we find in wholegrains, though - they are small soluble compounds known as ‘phenolics’.

    These phenolics, along with caffeine, add to the bitter taste and, in the test-tube, are known to be powerful antioxidants. Unfortunately, the ability of these compounds to reduce the risk of heart disease, cancer and liver disease by neutralising up harmful ‘oxidising’ chemicals in our bodies is unlikely, as they are poorly absorbed. They could assist in helping the bacteria in our gut to maintain our health though. In addition, the small amounts that are taken into our bodies might help support our liver and other defences so they can be better at preventing disease.

    Evidence for health benefits of coffee

    Effect on HealthWhat is it in the coffee that is having this effectType of Evidence
    AlertnessCaffeineApproved EU claim from European Food Safety Agency
    Increased attentionCaffeineApproved EU claim from European Food Safety Agency
    Increased performance inshort term high intensity and endurance exerciseCaffeineApproved EU claim from European Food Safety Agency
    Reduced risk of heart diseaseNot knownConsistent in a number of
    studies following up people who drink coffee for 5-10 years
    Risk of developing
    liver cancer
    Not knownConsistent in a number of studies following up people
    who drink coffee for 5-10 years
    Risk of developing
    Type 2 diabetes
    Not knownConsistent in a number of
    studies following up people who drink coffee for 5-10 years
    Risk of developing
    other cancers
    Not knownSome studies suggest a reduced risk, but inconclusive as others show no benefits

     

    So, coffee can be healthy, but is it as healthy as news stories say?

    There might just be something in coffee which is helpful to health, but is it as good as some of the papers say? Recent headlines have claimed that up to 25 cups of coffee a day are safe for heart health and that coffee may be the secret to helping fight obesity, but is this true?

    Firstly, the idea that up to 25 cups a day is good for our hearts was not a formal research paper but was a talk at a scientific meeting so much of the detail is hard to assess. However, when looking deeper into the research, the scientists grouped together everyone consuming 3 to 25 cups a day and only excluded those who drank more than 25 cups of coffee a day. So, although some people did drink two dozen cups of coffee a day, it’s more likely that most people had a far more typical 3 to 5 cups a day!

    In addition, when the news reports stated heart health, it didn’t look at whether heart attacks were prevented, but how ‘bouncy’ blood vessels were in the coffee drinkers’ fingers. This is an indirect assessment of risk of heart health, but it’s not exactly the same thing so this looks to be a good example where the headlines make an impact by inflating both the number of cups and the potential health benefits of coffee.

    Another recent coffee story suggested it could be a potential way of managing weight. The study investigated different types of body fat cells in the lab. This is because there is a special type of fat, called ‘brown adipose tissue’ found in people and more brown fat is found in naturally thinner people. Unfortunately, this study did not look at people who were overweight, nor did it look at changes in weight or if they actually burnt more calories! So, it didn’t really measure if coffee can help people lose weight at all. Once, again this was a news story that reported more than the actual research found out!

    It’s quite possible that coffee could be healthy though. Many studies of large communities of people seem to show it can be healthy when drunk in moderation. It seems that people who drink 1 to 3 cups of coffee a day appear to have lower risk of heart disease, liver disease and developing Type 2 diabetes, than those drinking none or those drinking many more. It’s not all about coffee intake though as other lifestyle factors such as smoking or non-smoking and fruit and vegetable intakes have an impact on health risks too.

    Is coffee healthy then?

    The way coffee is made seems to have a big impact on how healthy it is. Different beans, ways of roasting and brewing can certainly vary the caffeine content. For most people it’s the milk, sugar and syrups, cream, sprinkles and extras that probably influence how healthy your coffee is. A black americano or instant coffee will only contain a handful of calories, whereas the largest salted caramel mocha can contain over 500 calories, a quarter of a woman’s energy needs for a day and more.

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    Источник: https://www.bda.uk.com/resource/coffee-and-health-it-s-not-just-about-the-caffeine.html

    5 Health Benefits of Decaf Coffee – Based on Science

    Coffee is one of the most popular drinks in the world, with millions turning to this caffeinated beverage to get them through the day. There are many reasons people drink coffee, and it’s no surprise since it’s chock full of health benefits. Whether it’s for the caffeine jolt or the possible health benefits, it’s safe to say that coffee will remain popular for years to come. It’s one of the most competitive industries as well, so it’s no wonder coffee shops are constantly introducing new ways to enjoy it.

    Yet when the word “decaf” is mentioned amongst coffee lovers, it’s as if the world might end. Decaf coffee has a seriously negative reputation, even amongst the one-a-day coffee drinkers. Many people wonder what the point is to drinking decaf while others swear that it tastes worse than regular coffee. Part of the problem is that decaf coffee is chemically treated and has a history of using toxic chemicals for the decaffeination process, creating a negative connotation around the name.

    However, those dangerous solvents are no longer used and the end result is much safer to consume today. There are plenty of reasons why someone would switch to decaf, but it’s mostly due to a doctor’s recommendation. But, before going into the amazing health benefits of decaf coffee, let’s look at what decaf coffee really is:

    What is Decaf, Anyway?

    Decaf coffee may sound like a GMO product with scary connotations attached, but it’s much simpler than that. The decaffeination of coffee is the process of extracting the caffeine out of normal coffee beans using various different processes, resulting in a tasty, nearly caffeine-free coffee product. There are three main methods of decaffeinating coffee: water processing, direct solvent method, and supercritical carbon dioxide decaffeination method.

    The water processing method uses water to flush out the caffeine, making it completely chemical-free. The direct solvent method uses a chemical solvent (usually methylene chloride or ethyl acetate) to extract the caffeine. Finally, the supercritical carbon dioxide decaffeination method uses carbon dioxide as a solvent to extract the caffeine. While each method extracts similar percentages of caffeine, each method has a subtle taste difference.

    Although decaf coffee may be processed to get the end result, it’s important to remember that regular coffee beans are as well. Aside from the slight taste difference, swapping regular coffee for decaf can benefit you in the long run. Whether it’s due to a doctor’s recommendation or getting the jitters too often, sometimes decaf coffee is the way to go. And, while you may hear that regular coffee has more benefits, that shouldn’t deter you from trying some decaf in the morning. So what are the health benefits of decaf coffee, anyway?

    5 Amazing Health Benefits of Decaf Coffee:

    1. Decaf Coffee May Help Lower Risk of Type 2 Diabetes

    Coffee has been known for its ability to lower multiple conditions, but it has always been chalked up to the caffeine itself. However, decaf has been shown in a few studies to have similar effects, meaning that it’s not just the caffeine that lowers the risk of Type 2 Diabetes. In fact, it could be said that decaf coffee can be just as beneficial as regular coffee, without having to expose yourself to caffeine on a daily basis. While they’re not sure what is exactly causing these effects in both regular and decaf, the fact that it’s not solely the caffeine is an important finding to decaf drinkers everywhere.


    2. Less Caffeine Can Improve Sleep and Lower Anxiety

    Coffee is often the first thing suggested when someone is tired in the morning, especially after a long and restless night. However, caffeine is a powerful stimulant that can wreak havoc on your sleep, causing bouts of insomnia. Switching to decaf can help reduce insomnia that may be caused by too much caffeine, which will then improve your overall energy in the morning. Ditching caffeine can also help lower anxiety, especially in individuals that suffer from anxiety disorders.


     3. Decaf Coffee Contains the Same Antioxidants in Regular Coffee

    For those drinking coffee strictly for antioxidants, the switch to decaf should be an easy one because it still contains the same antioxidants as regular coffee. However, it should be noted that decaf has a slightly lower amount of these antioxidants, possibly due to the caffeine extraction process. Regardless, this means that those who have been chugging the world’s most used drug for health reasons can confidently switch to decaf.


    4. Decaf Coffee is Lower in Acidity than Regular Coffee

    Coffee is quite acidic and is often mixed with dairy to help reduce the acidic effects, but it can often lead to heartburn and other uncomfortable side effects. One major benefit of decaf coffee is the lower acidic content, which is usually due to the decaffeination process. For those that suffer from chronic heartburn and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), switching to decaf coffee to lower the number of acidic foods daily can help reduce flare-ups of acid reflux and other side effects.

    Looking for low-acid coffee?We heartily recommend Lifeboost’s naturally low-acid (and delicious) beans!


    5. Decaf Coffee May Lower Your Risk of Fatal Cardiovascular Diseases

    While regular coffee is often lauded for lowering the risk of multiple diseases and conditions, a recent study has shown that decaf may help reduce the risk of getting cardiovascular diseases. Since caffeine can worsen heart problems due to its stimulating effects, swapping your caffeinated java for some decaf may be better for your health if your family history is prone to heart problems.

    Final Thoughts on the Benefits of Decaf Coffee

    Decaf coffee has gone through the wringer, often being called pointless or “full of chemicals”. While regular coffee is the clear favorite amongst coffee drinkers, decaf coffee shouldn’t be shunned right away. It has a place in the coffee industry regardless of its toxic and rocky past, offering millions a caffeine-free coffee experience. Although it’s not as popular as regular coffee, decaf is readily available and can taste just like regular coffee.

    While regular coffee may have a long list of health benefits, decaf coffee is passed up too often as a possible “healthy” beverage. There are many reasons to switch to decaf, especially if an individual is prone to conditions triggered by caffeine intake. For those who can no longer have caffeine, decaf coffee is a great alternative. Even for those who don’t have any health problems, decaf coffee can help improve your energy and mood in the long run simply by getting rid of the need for caffeine.

    Decaf is a great caffeine alternative for die-hard coffee drinkers, regardless of the reason to switch. Although it will never truly replace regular coffee as the go-to for most people, decaf can still bring happiness in your cup each morning. Except for some benefits that actual caffeine offers, switching to decaf coffee will still give you the benefits that a regular cup of joe has.

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    Источник: https://coffeeaffection.com/benefits-of-decaf-coffee/

    We sure love our coffee. Even during lockdown lots of us managed to keep buying our daily flat white or Americano. So all of us should be happy to hear those drinks may actually have helped to keep us healthy. The latest assessments of the health effects of coffee and caffeine, its main active ingredient, are reassuring indeed. Their consumption has been linked to a reduced risk of all kinds of ailments, including Parkinson’s disease, heart disease, type-2 diabetes, gallstones, depression, suicide, cirrhosis, liver cancer, melanoma and prostate cancer.

    In fact, in numerous studies around the world, consuming enough coffee to provide 400mg of caffeine a day has been associated with reduced death rates. That’s about four or five cups of regular coffee. In takeway terms, an espresso shot contains 60-65mg of caffeine, and a latte, cappuccino or flat white usually contains at least one or two shots. (At Starbucks, you’ll get 150mg of caffeine from a Grande cappuccino and 225mg from a Venti cappuccino.)

    Overall, despite various concerns that have cropped up over the years, coffee is remarkably safe and has a number of important potential benefits

    In a study of more than 200,000 participants followed for up to 30 years, those who drank three to five cups of coffee a day, with or without caffeine, were 15 per cent less likely to die early from all causes than were people who shunned coffee. Perhaps most dramatic was a 50 per cent reduction in the risk of suicide among both men and women who were moderate coffee drinkers, perhaps by boosting production of brain chemicals that have antidepressant effects.

    As a report published last summer by a research team at the Harvard school of public health concluded, although current evidence may not warrant recommending coffee or caffeine to prevent disease, drinking coffee in moderation “can be part of a healthy lifestyle” for most people.

    It wasn’t always thus. I’ve lived through decades of sporadic warnings that coffee could be a health hazard. Over the years, coffee’s been deemed a cause of conditions such as heart disease, stroke, type-2 diabetes, pancreatic cancer, anxiety disorder, nutrient deficiencies, gastric-reflux disease, migraine, insomnia and premature death. As recently as 1991, the World Health Organisation listed coffee as a possible carcinogen. In some of the now-discredited studies, smoking, not coffee drinking (the two often went hand in hand), was responsible for the purported hazard.

    “These periodic scares have given the public a very distorted view,” says Dr Walter C Willett, professor of nutrition and epidemiology at the Harvard TH Chan school of public health. “Overall, despite various concerns that have cropped up over the years, coffee is remarkably safe and has a number of important potential benefits.”

    Even if you can fall asleep readily after an evening coffee, it may disrupt your ability to get adequate deep sleep

    That’s not to say coffee warrants a totally clean bill of health. Caffeine crosses the placenta into the foetus, and drinking coffee during pregnancy can increase the risk of miscarriage, low birth weight and premature birth. Pregnancy alters how the body metabolises caffeine, and women who are pregnant or nursing are advised to abstain entirely, stick to decaf or at the very least limit their caffeine intake to less than 200mg a day.

    The most common ill effect associated with caffeinated coffee is sleep disturbance. Caffeine locks into the same receptor in the brain as the neurotransmitter adenosine, a natural sedative. Dr Willett, a coauthor of the Harvard report, says, “I really do love coffee, but I have it only occasionally, because otherwise I don’t sleep very well. Lots of people with sleep problems don’t recognise the connection to coffee.”

    In discussing his audiobook on caffeine with Terry Gross on US National Public Radio last winter, Michael Pollan called caffeine “the enemy of good sleep” because it interferes with deep sleep. He confessed that after the challenging task of weaning himself from coffee, he “was sleeping like a teenager again”.

    Willett, who is now 75, says, “You don’t have to get to zero consumption to minimise the impact on sleep,” but he acknowledges that a person’s sensitivity to caffeine “probably increases with age”. People also vary widely in how rapidly they metabolise caffeine, enabling some to sleep soundly after drinking caffeinated coffee at dinner while others have trouble sleeping if they have coffee at lunch. But even if you can fall asleep readily after an evening coffee, it may disrupt your ability to get adequate deep sleep, Pollan writes in his forthcoming book, This Is Your Mind on Plants.

    Willett says it’s possible to develop a degree of tolerance to caffeine’s effect on sleep. My 75-year-old brother, an inveterate imbiber of caffeinated coffee, claims it has no effect on him. However, acquiring a tolerance to caffeine could blunt its benefit if, say, you wanted it to help you stay alert and focused while driving or taking a test.

    All the things people put into coffee can result in a junk food with as many as 500 to 600 calories

    Caffeine is one of more than 1,000 chemicals in coffee, not all of which are beneficial. Among others with positive effects are polyphenols and antioxidants. Polyphenols can inhibit the growth of cancer cells and lower the risk of type-2 diabetes; antioxidants, which have anti-inflammatory effects, can counter heart disease and cancer, both leading killers.

    None of this means coffee is beneficial regardless of how it’s prepared. When brewed without a paper filter, as in French press, Norwegian boiled coffee, espresso or Turkish coffee, oily chemicals called diterpenes come through that can raise artery-damaging LDL cholesterol. However, these chemicals are virtually absent in both filtered and instant coffee. Knowing I have a cholesterol problem, I dissected a coffee pod and found a paper filter lining the plastic cup. Phew!

    Also countering the potential health benefits of coffee are popular additions some people use, such as cream and sweet syrups, that can convert this calorie-free beverage into a calorie-rich dessert. “All the things people put into coffee can result in a junk food with as many as 500 to 600 calories,” Dr Willett says. A Grande Starbucks Mocha Frappuccino, for example, has about 36.8g of sugar, 16.3g of fat (11.5 of them saturated) and 312 calories.

    With iced-coffee season approaching, more people are likely to turn to cold-brew coffee. Now rising in popularity, cold brew counters coffee’s natural acidity and the bitterness that results when boiling water is poured over the grounds. Cold brew is made by steeping the grounds in cold water for several hours, then straining the liquid through a paper filter to remove the grounds and harmful diterpenes and keep the flavour and caffeine for you to enjoy. Cold brew can also be made with decaffeinated coffee.

    Decaf is not totally without health benefits. As with caffeinated coffee, the polyphenols it contains have anti-inflammatory properties that may lower the risk of type-2 diabetes and cancer. – New York Times

    Источник: https://www.irishtimes.com/life-and-style/food-and-drink/that-morning-cup-of-coffee-you-love-it-turns-out-to-boost-your-health-too-1.4594807

    If you're a regular coffee drinker (and rely on the stuff to help you get off the struggle bus in the morning), you've probably wondered why anyone, ever would want to drink decaf.

    I mean, what's coffee without the buzz?

    Of course, though, there are plenty of perfectly legit reasons to swap regular java for decaf—whether you're pregnant or breastfeeding, are sensitive to caffeine, or have anxiety.

    A girl's gotta wonder, though: How is decaf actually made? And does it offer the same benefits as your regular cup of Joe?

    “Regular and decaf coffee are natural plant foods that contains polyphenols," says Samantha Cassetty, RD, co-author of Sugar Shock. "These antioxidants have anti-inflammatory properties, and may help lower your risk for a number of diseases, including type 2 diabetes and cancer.” f 22 videos, “these compounds also serve as fuel for the beneficial bugs in our gut, so consuming polyphenols in coffee, tea, and fruits, and vegetables can promote a healthy mind and body by creating a healthy gut environment,” she adds.

    That said, though, decaf does come with its own pros and cons. Here's what to consider before dialing back on the caff.

    Claudia TotirGetty Images

    What is decaf coffee, really?

    Just to make sure everyone's clear, "decaf coffee is the same as regular coffee, but the caffeine has been removed to some degree,” says Jessica Cording, RD, dietitian and author of The Little Book of Game-Changers: 50 Healthy Habits For Managing Stress & Anxiety.

    Just like with regular coffee, the caffeine levels in a cup of decaf can vary, she says. Yep, most mugs of decaf still contain some caffeine.

    An eight-ounce Starbucks Pike Place decaf, for example, contains 15 milligrams of caffeine, while six ounces of Maxwell House decaf has anywhere from one to five milligrams.

    Typically, though decaf contains “about three to four milligrams of caffeine per cup,” says Sonya Angelone, RD, a spokeswoman for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. (Brands generally remove about 97 percent of the stuff.)

    So, how is decaf coffee made, exactly?

    You probably know that regular coffee is made by roasting and grinding coffee beans. The process of making decaf, though, involves an extra step or two.

    According to Angelone, there are three basic ways to decaffeinate coffee:

    • the Swiss water process, which uses a charcoal filter to remove the caffeine
    • adding (and then removing) is caffeinated coffee good for you carbon dioxide, which dissolve is caffeinated coffee good for you caffeine
    • adding (and then removing) methyl chloride (a chemical used in paint removers) or ethyl acetate (a chemical used in glue and nail polish remover), which also dissolve caffeine

    Sketched out by those last two chemicals? According to the Food and Drug Administration, they're safe to use—and apparently don't leave any residue on the beans, says Angelone.

    Dimitri OtisGetty Images

    Is decaf healthy, then?

    Even sans caffeine, decaf coffee still contains the health-boosting antioxidants you get from regular java, Angelone says. (Stripping out coffee's caffeine doesn't affect them.)

    In fact, both forms of coffee have been shown to decrease your risk of developing type 2 diabetes, Parkinson’s disease, Alzheimer’s disease, breast cancer, prostate cancer, and liver cancer, she adds.

    Is decaf actually better than regular coffee?

    Whether decaf coffee is actually better for you depends on, well, you.

    Of course, if you’re breastfeeding, pregnant, or have a health condition that requires you to limit caffeine, decaf is the obvious option.

    “Some people also find that caffeine makes them anxious or jittery, so if you’ve experienced this, you may want to switch to decaf,” Cassetty says. Same goes if you notice that mid-afternoon cup tends to keep you up at night.

    Your ideal coffee option also depends on the state of your stomach. According to Cassetty, both regular and decaf coffee can cause digestive symptoms in sensitive people.

    However, caffeinated coffee tends to cause more issues, like upset stomach and acid reflux. If it doesn't bug your stomach, though, it can actually help keep you regular, adds Cassetty.

    Ultimately, it comes down to personal preference. “When you’re considering decaf versus regular coffee, it’s primarily about the caffeine,” Cording says.

    How to find yourself a quality decaf coffee.

    If you’re big into coffee and concerned about some of the chemicals used to make decaf, “it’s worth it to purchase organic,” Cording says.

    Organic coffee is free of chemicals and pesticides, and that can make a difference in your overall health—especially if you drink java every day.

    A few of her go-to's:

    Fresh Roasted Coffee Organic Decaf Peruvian Coffee

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    Cording buys this organic, fair-trade coffee (which uses the Swiss water method to remove caffeine) a lot. “I like it because I can find really nice, organic coffees, including decaf,” she says.

    365 Everyday Value Organic Decaf Morning Blend Coffee

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    Whole Foods’ store brand decaf is organic, chemical-free, and made using the Swiss water process. It has a robust flavor and is also certified kosher.

    Trader Joe's Fair Trade Organic French Roast Decaf Coffee

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    This Trader Joe's coffee may be low on caffeine, but it’s high on flavor. It uses 100-percent dark-roasted Arabica beans and is chemical-free.


    How to keep your coffee habit healthy.

    If your daily cup (or cups) of coffee is working for you, keep on doing what you’re doing.

    Just make sure you're sipping on a high-quality brand and are careful not to go overboard on extras like syrups, sugar, and creamers. “The sugar and calories can add up quickly and minimize coffee's health benefits,” Angelone says.

    If you just can’t with completely black coffee but want to cut back on all the add-ins, Cassetty recommends stirring some cinnamon into your brew. “The spice adds a hint of sweetness without added sugar,” she says.

    Otherwise, avoid drinking caffeinated coffee after 3 p.m. to make sure it doesn’t mess with your sleep.

    Korin MillerKorin Miller is a freelance writer specializing in general wellness, sexual health and relationships, and lifestyle trends, with work appearing in Men’s Health, Women’s Health, Self, Glamour, and more.

    This content is created and maintained by a third party, and imported onto this page to help users provide their email addresses. You may be able to find more information about this and similar content at piano.io

    Источник: https://www.womenshealthmag.com/food/a30768102/decaf-coffee/

    5 Surprising Health Benefits Of Drinking Hot Coffee Vs. Iced Coffee

    When you're deciding between getting a cup of hot coffee or a cold brew, you may base your decision on your mood or what the weather is like outside. While temperature is an obvious difference between the two, it isn't the only thing. According to experts, there are some surprising differences in the health benefits of drinking hot coffee and iced coffee.

    The benefits of drinking coffee, regardless of temperature, are numerous. When consumed in moderation coffee can help to reduce depression, lower your risk for getting diabetes, improve your workouts, and give your brain a good boost. A 2018 study published in JAMA Internal Medicine, found that drinking coffee can also help you live longer.

    If you have a preference for iced coffees or cold brews, Dr. Maheinthan Yogeswaran, a general practitioner with Medicspot, tells Bustle, there are benefits to drinking it over hot coffee. For instance, iced coffee is known to be less acidic. "This is calmer on your digestive system so you’re less likely to have an upset stomach after drinking your cup of joe cold," Dr. Yogeswaran says. Less acidity is also better for maintaining healthy teeth.

    "Although cold-brewed coffee became a rising star in the health field over the last few years, hot coffee still has some significant advantages," Karin Is caffeinated coffee good for you, certified nutritionist and health coach, tells Bustle. So here are some surprising health benefits of drinking hot coffee versus drinking iced coffee, according to experts.

    1

    Hot Coffee Has More Antioxidants

    In a 2018 study published in Scientific Reports, researchers from Thomas Jefferson University found "chemical differences" between hot and cold brew coffees. Hot coffee was found to have higher levels of antioxidants than cold is caffeinated coffee good for you, which makes it slightly more healthy. This is important because antioxidants are responsible for the health benefits you get from coffee. According to Dr. Nikola Djordjevic, MD from DisturbMeNot, the benefits of antioxidants in coffee include a lower risk of cancer, heart disease, liver disease, diabetes, and premature death.

    2

    Cold Brews Generally Have Less Caffeine

    The amount of caffeine in your coffee can vary based on where you're getting your coffee from. "Generally speaking, cold brew contains less caffeine which is a benefit for those who really crave a second cup of coffee but feel a little shaky," Jordan Karcher, coffee expert and founder of Grounds & Hounds Coffee Co., tells Bustle. Cold brews typically contain around 40mg of caffeine per 100g, while hot coffee contains roughly 60mg per 100g of coffee. Benefits of consuming less caffeine include getting better sleep, more balanced hormones in women, and lower blood pressure.

    3

    Hot Coffee Can Put You In A More Pleasant And Generous Mood

    "A cup of hot coffee in the morning may actually put you in a more positive mindset," Adoni says. In fact, a 2009 study published in the journal Science found that experiencing physical warmth, like holding a cup of hot coffee, can increase feelings of interpersonal warmth. In a series of studies, researchers split participants in two groups. One group was told to briefly hold a cup of hot coffee, while the other held iced coffee. Participants who held a cup of hot coffee were more likely to see others as being generous, caring, and warm. They is caffeinated coffee good for you also more likely to choose a gift for their friend over themselves.

    4

    Iced Coffee Can Help To Prevent A Heart Attack

    Coffee can be very beneficial to your health because it's a good source of antioxidants, which helps to protect you from many diseases. But iced coffee is especially helpful in protecting you against heart attacks. As Dr. Yogeswaran says, "Iced coffee is surprisingly helpful as it contains compounds such as caffeine, magnesium, trigonelline and phenolic compounds that can work by both stabilizing your blood pressure, increasing insulin sensitivity and lowering blood pressure." A 2017 University of Colorado study found that drinking coffee every week — no matter what temperature — can help to reduce your chances of getting a heart attack by 7%.

    5

    A Whiff Of Hot Coffee In The Morning Can Wake You Up And Make You Feel Less Stressed

    Sometimes you don't even need to drink coffee in order to receive its benefits. A 2008 study published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistryfound that the aroma of coffee can alter the activity of certain genes in the brain. In a study of sleep deprived lab rats, researchers found different gene expressions between rats that were able to sniff the coffee and those that didn't. As it was found, just one whiff of hot coffee was enough to reduce the effects of sleep deprivation like stress and tiredness. More research needs to be done to make any conclusions on the effects of coffee aroma on humans.

    In general, coffee in moderation can be good for you so it doesn't really matter which type of coffee you choose to drink. Both hot coffee and iced coffee have their share of health benefits. These are just a few notable differences to be aware of.

    Источник: https://www.bustle.com/p/5-health-benefits-of-drinking-coffee-hot-vs-iced-18161107

    Green Tea vs. Coffee: Which Is Better for You? We Asked a Nutritionist

    Green Tea vs. Coffee: Which Is Better for You? We Asked a Nutritionist

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    You’ve started your day with a cup of coffee for as long as you can remember. But maybe the caffeine doesn’t work its magic like it once did—or maybe it’s actually too powerful these days. It’s no surprise your coworker’s green tea is looking more appetizing every week. But is there that big a difference health-wise between the two drinks? We called on Dr. Felicia Stoler, DCN, a registered dietitian, nutritionist and exercise physiologist, to settle the green tea vs. coffee debate once and for all.  

    RELATED: Why You Shouldn’t Drink Coffee on an Empty Stomach, According to a Nutritionist

    Green Tea vs. Coffee: Which Is Better to Drink Every Day?

    “They’re both very different in terms of structure, flavonoids and antioxidants,” says Stoler. The main caveat for both drinks is really their caffeine content—and how your body personally reacts to it. For instance, if you have no side effects from consuming caffeine but have acid reflux, green tea might be the better choice for you. If you literally hate the taste of green tea but coffee makes you jittery, it’s safe to stick to the java and cut back or use a mix of decaf and regular grounds. The TLDR: They’re both fine to drink on the regular—it’s just a matter of choosing what’s best for your body and needs. “Both [drinks] naturally contain caffeine, but there are decaffeinated versions available. I actually think if people consumed both, that would be great," says Stoler. "[It will] add some variety to the types of antioxidants and phytonutrients that you receive."

    What Are the Health Benefits of Coffee and Green Tea?

    Let’s face it: Most of us don’t drink coffee every day for our health. It’s typically for the caffeine boost, which we count on to drag us out of dream mode (and um, bed) and into real life every morning. We’d guess most green tea drinkers are in it for the energy boost too, though it has less caffeine. And the fact is, it’s tough for scientists to conclusively narrow down the perks or pitfalls of either drink. “The challenge with the research in humans is that it’s impossible to do longitudinal studies on [coffee or green tea] to isolate the benefits or harm without other confounding factors,” says Stoler. So, what do we know for sure?

    Coffee, once colloquially thought to wreak havoc on the heart, is actually healthier than you may realize (before you add your caramel syrup and creamer, that is). Coffee is rich in antioxidants, which can help protect against type 2 diabetes, Parkinson’s and certain types of cancer. Some people also swear that coffee helps keep their bowel movements regular. Coffee’s caffeine content is great for times when you need a short burst of energy and focus, say before you hit the gym or give a big presentation at work.

    Green tea is better for mellow relaxation and a subtler energy boost (it kills the 3-o’clock slump like a charm). Packed with cancer-fighting polyphenols, it can help burn fat, lower cholesterol and boost your metabolism. It can help fight against potential diseases like dementia, Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s, as well as reduce your risk for heart attack or stroke. Green tea is loaded with antioxidants that help your body detox, slow aging and combat inflammation. Most notably, green tea has a ton of L-theanine, an amino acid that boosts dopamine and reduces anxiety. It may help you relax so well during the day that your quality of sleep might actually improve.

    Stoler also notes that both beverages are solid ways to stay hydrated. “For people who don't like plain water, drinking coffee or green tea are a great way to increase fluid consumption. However, if you’re drinking either with lots of added ingredients (milk, cream, sweeteners, syrups, etc.), then it’s an easy way to add unnecessary calories.”

    Are There Risks to Drinking Too Much Coffee or Green Is caffeinated coffee good for you the main pro and con to each of these beverages is caffeine—the side you’re on just depends on your body’s reactions to it. “Nobody wants a rapid heart rate or to be kept up all night,” says Stoler. Caffeine’s consequent effects are actually why some experts don’t recommend having a cup of joe first thing in the morning—especially women. Coffee increases cortisol, aka the stress hormone that helps regulate your energy and alertness throughout the day. Cortisol is naturally high in the morning, so giving yourself an extra dose when you wake up can blunt its production and get your natural cycle out of whack. In fact, some studies show that it can cause you to naturally produce more cortisol than you need. That can negatively impact your ovulation, weight and hormones over time.

    If you’re drinking coffee first thing in the morning and on an empty stomach, here’s why you shouldn’t: Coffee stimulates acid production in the stomach (if you’re prone to GI issues or have GERD, odds are you already learned that the hard way). Neutralizing your stomach acid (and that of the coffee) with a calcium-rich breakfast, like yogurt and almonds, can save you a lot of discomfort down the line. Other potential downsides to drinking coffee may include reduced bone density, an increase in cholesterol and higher risk for heart disease—but the studies are sparse and the results are is caffeinated coffee good for you in all pretty inconclusive. 

    Green tea, on the other hand, is easier on the gut than coffee and pretty low-risk all around, unless you have a history of kidney stones. Green and black tea have high levels of oxalates, which can lead to the formation of more stones (though it’s pretty rare). Other downsides include stained teeth after long-term consumption, which coffee can also cause, and weakened iron absorption. Tanins, an antioxidant in tea, can interfere with and reduce how much iron your body actually absorbs in a meal.

    What Can Happen When You Switch?

    It all comes down to the caffeine. If you’re switching from green tea to coffee, you might notice you’re a little more jittery than usual. But switching from coffee to tea might give you symptoms of caffeine withdrawal. According to the Cleveland Clinic, cutting yourself off cold turkey can bring on headache, fatigue, concentration issues, muscle pain and even flu-like nausea. Withdrawal can last up to nine days; the more caffeine you’re used to consuming, the more severe the withdrawal can be. Since we’re talking about switching from coffee to green tea, you won’t be totally cut off from caffeine. Just try gradually reducing your oklahoma regional food bank okc (or substituting coffee with tea or decaf coffee) for a few days until you feel no symptoms.

    If caffeine is still an issue even when you’ve switched to drinking mostly tea, think about switching to decaffeinated tea or coffee. Removing the caffeine and its effects from the equation actually sort of levels the playing field for both beverages. But you should know: Decaffeinated tea and coffee may not be as beneficial, because the decaffeinating process strips the drinks of some of their antioxidants. So, just decide what’s best for you based on the reason why you drink coffee or green tea in the first place: the energy boost, the health benefits or the routine itself.  

    Tips for Switching from Coffee to Green Tea

    If you’re hopping on the green tea train, drink it in the morning to wake up your brain, or during an afternoon slump—the exact time doesn’t matter much, because green tea actually *reduces* stress hormones like cortisol. And just for the record, you shouldn’t drink either beverage right before bed. Green tea has is caffeinated coffee good for you third of the amount of caffeine that coffee does (about 30 milligrams versus 96), but it’s still to be avoided in the evening, namely in the couple of hours before you hit the hay. It’s still significant enough to trigger your hormones and adrenals, which translates to less sleep and late-night alertness.

    Bottom line: Pay attention to how your body feels as you tweak your daily routine. Are you sleeping better? Feeling less anxious? Take note of what makes you feel your best and run with it. “Hot or cold, both drinks are great to consume and have health benefits,” says Stoler. “So, instead of thinking of it as either/or, consider how to make both work in the day.”

    RELATED: Should You Drink Green Tea Before Bed? We Weight the Pros and Cons

    Источник: https://www.purewow.com/food/green-tea-vs-coffee

    How high is too high? "Research shows that for most healthy people, consumption of up to 400mg of caffeine per day is safe," says Sarah Rueven, RD, MS, CDN, founder of Rooted Wellness. "This equates to about two to three cups of coffee. However, the caffeine content of coffee varies greatly depending on the source of the bean and preparation method." For someone with a mild habit, that sounds reasonable enough. But for someone with a more extreme consumption habit, well that's a different story.

    To get back to basics, you might be wondering what exactly caffeine does to your body to help you stay alert when you're running on three hours of sleep. First off, how you're affected by caffeine can depend on age and genetics, which will determine how your body absorbs and metabolizes it.

    "Caffeine enters the bloodstream and works as a stimulant as it binds to adenosine receptors in the brain," says Yasi Ansari, MS, RD, CSSD, a national spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. "Adenosine is a nervous system depressant. It promotes sleep controls and can affect memory and learning. When caffeine binds to these receptors, adenosine's effects are lessened and the body is instead stimulated; then it increases adrenaline, which gives the body a boost of energy!"

    And energy isn't the only benefit of caffeine, the experts shared what you can feel good about when sipping your cup of joe (or tea):

    Источник: https://thethirty.whowhatwear.com/is-caffeine-bad-for-you

    5 Health Benefits of Decaf Coffee – Based on Science

    Coffee is one of the most popular drinks in the world, with millions turning to this caffeinated beverage to get them through the day. There are many reasons people drink coffee, and it’s no surprise since it’s chock full of health benefits. Whether it’s for the caffeine jolt or the possible health benefits, it’s safe to say that coffee will remain popular for years to come. It’s one of the most competitive industries as well, so it’s no wonder coffee shops are constantly introducing new ways to enjoy it.

    Yet when the word “decaf” is mentioned amongst coffee lovers, it’s as if the world might end. Decaf coffee has a seriously negative reputation, even amongst the one-a-day coffee drinkers. Many people wonder what the point is to drinking decaf while others swear that it tastes worse than regular coffee. Part of the problem is that decaf coffee is chemically treated and has a history of using toxic chemicals for the decaffeination process, creating a negative connotation around the name.

    However, those dangerous solvents are no longer used and the end result is much safer to consume today. There are plenty of reasons why someone would switch to decaf, but it’s mostly due to a doctor’s recommendation. But, before going into the amazing health benefits of decaf coffee, let’s look at what decaf coffee really is:

    What is Decaf, Anyway?

    Decaf coffee may sound like a GMO product with scary connotations attached, but it’s much simpler than that. The decaffeination of coffee is the process of extracting the caffeine out of normal coffee beans using various different processes, resulting in a tasty, nearly caffeine-free coffee product. There five nights at freddys action figures three main methods of decaffeinating coffee: water processing, direct solvent method, and supercritical carbon dioxide decaffeination method.

    The water processing method uses water to flush out the caffeine, making it completely chemical-free. The direct solvent method uses a chemical solvent (usually methylene chloride or ethyl acetate) to extract the caffeine. Finally, the supercritical carbon dioxide decaffeination method uses carbon dioxide as a solvent to extract the caffeine. While each method extracts similar percentages of caffeine, each method has a subtle taste difference.

    Although decaf coffee may be processed to get the end result, it’s important to remember that regular coffee beans are as well. Aside from the slight taste difference, swapping regular coffee for decaf can benefit you in the long run. Whether it’s due to a doctor’s recommendation or getting the jitters too often, sometimes decaf coffee is the way to go. And, while you may hear that regular coffee has more benefits, that shouldn’t deter you from trying some decaf in the morning. So what are the health benefits of decaf coffee, anyway?

    5 Amazing Health Benefits of Decaf Coffee:

    1. Decaf Coffee May Help Lower Risk of Type 2 Diabetes

    Coffee has been known for its ability to lower multiple conditions, but it has always been chalked up to the caffeine itself. However, decaf has been shown in a few studies to have similar effects, meaning that it’s not just the caffeine that lowers the risk of Type 2 Diabetes. In fact, it could be said that decaf coffee can be just as beneficial as regular coffee, without having to expose yourself to caffeine on a daily basis. While they’re not sure what is exactly causing these effects in both regular and decaf, the fact that it’s not solely the caffeine is an important finding to decaf drinkers everywhere.


    2. Less Caffeine Can Improve Sleep and Lower Anxiety

    Coffee is often the first thing suggested when someone is tired in the morning, especially after a long and restless night. However, caffeine is a powerful stimulant that can wreak havoc on your sleep, causing bouts of insomnia. Switching to decaf can help reduce insomnia that may be caused by too much caffeine, which will then improve your overall energy in the morning. Ditching caffeine can also help lower anxiety, especially in individuals that suffer from anxiety disorders.


     3. Decaf Coffee Contains the Same Antioxidants in Regular Coffee

    For those drinking coffee strictly for antioxidants, the switch to decaf should be an easy one because it still contains the same antioxidants as regular coffee. However, it should be noted that decaf has a slightly lower amount of these antioxidants, possibly due to the caffeine extraction process. Regardless, this means that those who have been chugging the world’s most used drug for health reasons can confidently switch to decaf.


    4. Decaf Coffee is Lower in Acidity than Regular Coffee

    Coffee is quite acidic and is often mixed with dairy to help reduce the acidic effects, but it can often lead to heartburn and other uncomfortable side effects. One major benefit of decaf coffee is the lower acidic content, which is usually due to the decaffeination process. For those that suffer from chronic heartburn and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), switching to decaf coffee to lower the number of acidic foods daily can help reduce flare-ups of acid reflux and other side effects.

    Looking for low-acid coffee?We heartily recommend Lifeboost’s naturally low-acid (and delicious) beans!


    5. Decaf Coffee May Lower Your Risk of Fatal Cardiovascular Diseases

    While regular coffee is often lauded for lowering the risk of multiple diseases and conditions, a bank of america money network fees study has shown that decaf may help reduce the risk of getting cardiovascular diseases. Since caffeine can worsen heart problems due to its stimulating effects, swapping your caffeinated java for some decaf may be better for your health if your family history is prone to heart problems.

    Final Thoughts on the Benefits of Decaf Coffee

    Decaf coffee has gone through the wringer, often being called pointless or “full of chemicals”. While regular coffee is the clear favorite amongst coffee drinkers, decaf coffee shouldn’t be shunned right away. It has a place in the coffee industry regardless of its toxic and rocky past, offering millions a caffeine-free coffee experience. Although it’s not as popular as regular coffee, decaf is readily available and can taste just like regular coffee.

    While regular coffee may have a long list of health benefits, decaf coffee is passed up too often as a possible “healthy” beverage. There are many reasons to switch to decaf, especially if an individual is prone to conditions triggered by caffeine intake. For those who can no longer have caffeine, decaf coffee is a great alternative. Even for those who don’t have any health problems, decaf coffee can help improve your energy and mood in the long run simply by getting rid of the need for caffeine.

    Decaf is a great caffeine alternative for die-hard coffee drinkers, regardless of the reason to switch. Although it will never truly replace regular coffee as the go-to for most people, decaf can still bring happiness in your cup each morning. Except for some benefits that actual caffeine offers, switching to decaf coffee will still give you the benefits that a regular cup of joe has.

    READY TO BUY? Choose from our favorite decaf brands:

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    Источник: https://coffeeaffection.com/benefits-of-decaf-coffee/
    is caffeinated coffee good for you

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    3 Comments to Is caffeinated coffee good for you

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