Category: For you

     

    Are bananas good for you uk


    are bananas good for you uk

    1) Energy bars · 2) Bananas · 3) Porridge · 4) Oats & blueberries (with a protein shake for good measure) · 5) Toast with honey or jam · 6) Wholemeal bagel with. If you end up with a lot of overripe bananas and can't bear to make another loaf suffering from depression, many felt much better after eating a banana. Horses can eat banana peels, but not all of them will be interested in eating them, owing to their bitter taste. The peels are just as healthy.
    are bananas good for you uk

    watch the video

    What Will Happen if You Eat 2 Bananas a Day

    Going Bananas

     

    The expression "going bananas" is from the effects of bananas on the brain.  Read on:


    Never, put your banana in the refrigerator!

    They pump out loads of ethelene gas, which speeds the ripening of other fruits. This goes against the purpose of a fridge, which is to lengthen the shelf life of spoilable produce by about a week.

    Bananas will ripen at room temperature, away from heat or direct sun. Don't refrigerate under-ripe bananas because they'll never get any riper. Once they get to the right stage, however, you can put them in the refrigerator for up to two weeks. The outside will turn black, but the fruit is still quite edible. If you end up with a lot of overripe bananas and can't bear to make another loaf of banana bread, cut them into chunks, wrap them in plastic wrap and put them in the freezer. When you want a sweet treat this summer, just pop one in your mouth.

    Bananas contain three natural sugars - sucrose, fructose and glucose combined with fiber. A banana gives an instant, sustained and substantial boost of energy.

    Research has proven that just two bananas provide enough energy for a strenuous 90-minute workout. No wonder the banana is the number one what time does pickup close at walmart with the world's leading athletes.

    But energy isn't the only way a banana can help us keep fit. It can also help overcome or prevent a substantial number of illnesses and conditions, making it a must to add to our daily diet.


    Depression:

    According to a recent survey undertaken by MIND amongst people suffering from depression, many felt much better after eating a banana. This is because bananas contain tryptophan, a type of protein that the body converts into serotonin, known to make you relax, improve your mood and generally make you feel happier.

    PMS:

    Forget the pills - eat a banana. The vitamin B6 it contains regulates blood glucose levels, which can affect your mood.

    Anemia:

    High in iron, bananas can stimulate the production of hemoglobin in the blood and so helps in cases of anemia.

    Blood Pressure:

    This unique tropical fruit is extremely high in potassium yet low in salt, making it perfect to beat blood pressure. So much so, the US Food and Drug Administration has just allowed the banana industry to make official claims for the fruit's ability to reduce the risk of blood pressure and stroke.

    Brain Power:

    200 students at a Twickenham (Middlesex) school ( England ) were helped through their exams this year by eating bananas at breakfast, break, and lunch in a bid to boost their brain power. Research has shown that the potassium-packed fruit can assist learning by making pupils more alert.

    Constipation:

    High in fiber, including bananas in the diet can help restore normal bowel action, helping to overcome the problem without resorting to laxatives.  

    Gardening:

    If you have  roses in your garden, drape the used banana skin around the base of the tree and your roses will bloom in abundance.  One main financial debt consolidation reviews very good fertiliser for any garden plants and it easily rots down without having to compost it first.

    Hangovers:

    One of the quickest ways of curing a hangover is to make a banana milkshake, sweetened with honey. The banana calms the stomach and, with the help of the honey, builds up depleted blood sugar levels, while the milk soothes and re-hydrates your system.

    Heartburn:

    Bananas have a natural antacid effect in the body, so if you suffer from heartburn, try eating a banana for soothing relief.

    Morning Sickness:

    Snacking on bananas between meals helps to keep blood sugar levels up and avoid morning sickness.

    Mosquito Bites:

    Before reaching for the insect bite cream, try rubbing the affected area with the inside of a banana skin. Many people find it amazingly successful at reducing swelling and irritation.

    Nerves:

    Bananas are high in B vitamins that help calm the nervous system.

    Overweight:

    And at work? Studies at the Institute of Psychology in Austria found pressure at work leads to gorging on comfort food like chocolate and chips. Looking at 5,000 hospital patients, researchers found the most obese were more likely to be in high-pressure jobs. The report concluded that, to avoid panic-induced food cravings, we need to control our blood sugar levels by snacking on high carbohydrate foods every two hours to keep levels steady.

    Ulcers:

    The banana is used as the dietary food against intestinal disorders because of its soft texture and smoothness. It is the only raw fruit that can be eaten without distress in over-chronicler cases. It also neutralizes over-acidity and reduces irritation by coating the lining of the stomach.

    Temperature control:

    Many other cultures activate your us bank credit card bananas as a "cooling" fruit that can lower both the physical and emotional temperature of expectant mothers. In Thailandfor example, pregnant women eat bananas to ensure their baby is born with a cool temperature.


    Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD):

    Bananas can help SAD sufferers because they contain the natural mood enhancer tryptophan.

    Smoking &Tobacco Use:

    Bananas can also help people trying to give up smoking. The B6, B12 they contain, as well as the potassium and magnesium found in them, help the body recover from the effects of nicotine withdrawal.  Unless accommpanied by extra exercise they will also help to pile the weight on - always a catch!

    Stress:

    Potassium is a vital mineral, which helps normalize the heartbeat, sends oxygen to the brain and regulates your body's water balance. When we are stressed, our metabolic rate rises, thereby reducing our potassium levels. These can be re balanced with the help of a are bananas good for you uk banana snack.

    Strokes:

    According to research in The New England Journal of Medicine, eating bananas as part of a regular diet can cut the risk of death by strokes by as much as 40%.

    Warts:

    Those keen on natural alternatives swear that if you want to kill off a wart, take a piece of banana skin and place it on the wart, with the yellow side out. Carefully hold the skin in place with a plaster or surgical tape!  Www walmart one com it there until the wart has gone.


    So, a banana really is a natural remedy for many ills. When you compare it to an apple, it has four times the protein, twice the carbohydrate, three times the phosphorus, five times the vitamin A and iron, and twice the other vitamins and minerals. It is also rich in potassium and is one pnc mortgage make payment online the best value foods around So maybe its time to change that well-known phrase so that we say, "A banana a day keeps the doctor away!"

    PASS IT ON TO YOUR FRIENDS
    PS: Bananas must be the reason monkeys are so happy all the time!

    Shoe Shine; want a quick shine on our shoes?? Take the INSIDE of the banana skin, and rub directly on the shoe.polish with dry cloth. Amazing fruit !!!

     

    Word of caution.  Bananas have a quick energy release - that's why they're popular with sports people.  You should not eat too many bananas if you are sedentary.  Bananas readily soak into their skin and flesh agricultural poisins associated with weed killer, fertiliser and environmental so these days organic is best.

      

    Источник: https://www.mindandbodybury.co.uk/page_1959199.html

    Some fruits and vegetables can be very toxic to dogs, for example, onions and grapes. Others can make a perfect treat, so it’s important to know which are which. With that in mind, can dogs eat bananas? 

    The good news is, yes, they can! Bananas can be a healthy treat for adult dogs, but it pays to be a little more cautious when feeding bananas to puppies. 

    Introducing bananas to a dog’s diet

    Whenever a new food is introduced to a dog, it is always best to start slowly, giving the digestive system time to adjust. Dogs aren’t used to the large amounts of fibre in a banana and, in particular, the skin. While the skin isn’t dangerous to dogs, it is best to feed only peeled bananas to avoid sickness or diarrhoea.

    Some dogs will turn their noses up at a banana, but others will enjoy the sweet, fruity flavour. It just depends on the dog!

    How much banana can my dog eat?

    One banana benefit is that they don’t contain all the fat and salt that some manufactured treats do. If your dog likes bananas, they can be used as a tasty treat, however, it’s worth remembering that they are high in sugar, so if you're watching your dog’s waistline, limit banana treats to once in a while. 

    Bananas are a good source of magnesium, which can help with absorption of vitamins, promoting bone growth and protein production. They also contain potassium, vitamin C, vitamin B and fibre, but are no substitute for balanced and complete dog food.

    There is a feeding rule some vets and nutritionists like to follow. It’s called the 90/10 rule and should be implemented when feeding dogs extras, such as banana chunks. While 90% of a dog’s calories should come from quality dog food, the remaining 10% can be of treats!

    What about feeding bananas to puppies? 

    Heed caution when feeding bananas to puppies. They need a particular diet to help them grow correctly. Too much banana, or other treats, can upset the finely calculated balance of the feeding plan, so it might be best to avoid feeding bananas to puppies.

    Remember, when introducing puppies to a new food for the first time, they can get an upset stomach - are bananas good for you uk new foods must be introduced gradually.

    With a Kennel Club Pet Insurance policy, you can access the free Pet Health Helpline, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. The veterinary-trained team will advise on any concerns or queries that you may have over your pet’s health – much like the NHS are bananas good for you uk service for people. Call free on 03333 32 19 47.

    By Shelley Harrison

    Share thisFacebookTwitterИсточник: https://www.kcinsurance.co.uk/hub/2021/june/can-dogs-eat-bananas/

    There's a very good reason you receive a banana at the finish line of pretty much every race.

    Bananas have built themselves quite the reputation as a go-to, pre- and post-workout snack, largely because they are high in the electrolyte potassium. They're also a great source of easily digestible carbohydrates. Oh, and they're are bananas good for you uk the good reputation bananas carry, you may have heard some internet "experts" trying to slander their name.

    Bananas are higher in sugar than some other fruits, these "experts" say. For that reason, they also contain more calories. And for that reason, you should avoid eating bananas to avoid eating too many calories so that you can lose weight.

    But, wait, hold up. Is that really true?

    Here’s what legit experts have to say.

    Are Bananas Good for Weight Loss?

    izusek

    “Bananas have an undeserved bad reputation for being too high in sugar, when they’re extremely nutritious. Sure, they are higher in sugar than many other fruits, but the sugar we’re talking about here is natural sugar, not added—like in a candy bar,” says Charlotte Martin, MS, RDN, CSOWM, CPT.

    So, the sugar from a banana isn’t bad for you, and it’s totally fine to eat bananas in moderation if you want to lose weight.

    Are Bananas Good for a Healthy Diet?

    As for nutritional content, one medium banana contains a little over three grams of fiber and 12 percent of your daily value for potassium.

    Both fiber and potassium support heart health, says Martin. Plus, fiber helps you feel full and feeling full helps prevent you from snacking on empty calories.

    Total carbohydrate needs vary from person to person, but you can still lose weight on a high-arbohydrate diet as long as the calories you’re taking in are less than the calories you’re burning.

    This content is imported from {embed-name}. You may be able to find the same content in another format, or you may be able to find more information, at their web site.

    "I recommend everyone, especially those looking to lose weight, consume most of their sugar intake from natural sources, like bananas and other fruits," Martin says.

    How Many Bananas Should I Eat Daily?

    Anjelika Gretskaia

    Again, fruit sugar sources are in the company of fiber, which is the type of carbohydrate you want to maximize in your diet.

    “I typically recommend the average person looking to maintain or lose weight aim for two servings of fruit per day. However, if you’re extremely active and/or have increased calorie needs you may want to increase that amount,” she says.

    And when it comes to bananas and weight loss, make the most of your fruit by pairing with protein to help increase satiety and stabilize blood sugar levels. Think: string cheese, nut butter, or yogurt. american state bank online

    This content is created and maintained by a third party, and imported onto this page to help users provide their email addresses. You may be able to find more information about this and similar content at piano.io

    Источник: https://www.menshealth.com/nutrition/a32406556/bananas-weight-loss/

    8 Foods That Are Surprisingly Bad for the Environment

    Why Global Citizens Should Care 

    Through some of the food we consume, whether it be in their production or their transportation, we are unknowingly contributing to the damage and harm done to our planet. You can help by taking action to  encourage responsible consumption and production, sustainability, and climate change limitation by taking action here.

    Often when we’re sitting down to our meals, we don’t think about the impact that the foods we’re eating are having on our planet. The production cycles behind a lot of our foods have a large carbon footprint, or require a lot of water, or drive deforestation. So it’s really important to be aware of which foods are good or bad for the environment and to shop sustainably.

    Not all food is bad for the environment, and you can take a look at foods that have a positive impact here. But here are some foods to watch out for as being surprisingly bad for our planet. 

    Take action: Educating Girls Strengthens the Global Fight Against Climate Change

    1. Bananas

    The environmental impact of bananas isn't so much in the production of the fruit, but more in the cost of exporting them to other countries across the world. 

    According to One Green Planet, bananas are among the most widely consumed foods in the world, and are the most popular fruit in the United States. The average American will eat about 100 bananas in a single year.

    The world’s leading countries for banana exports include Ecuador, the Philippines, Costa Rica, Colombia, and Guatemala — which send a lot of bananas to Europe, where people have got used to being able to eat their favourite fruits even when they’re out of season. 

    But these bananas have travelled huge distances — to reach the UK, for example, the average banana travels 5,106 miles — and that journey contributes to CO2 levels in the atmosphere. 

    via GIPHY

    2. Avocados 

    This one might hurt a few people. For all you fans of guacamole and avocado on toast it might be time to reconsider — because, you guessed it, avocado production is damaging the environment. 

    In Mexico, for example, a great deal of avocado production takes place in the mountains of Michoacán. But, according to the Associated Press news agency, the www walmart one com and planting of avocado trees uses twice as much water as a fairly dense forest. 

    A researcher from Mexico’s National Institute for Forestry revealed that between 2001 and 2010, avocado production tripled in Michoacán — and that the rise in demand for avocados had caused the loss of about 1,700 acres a year.

    Another issue with avocado production, according to Greenpeace Mexico, is the use of chemicals and high volumes of wood to pack and ship the fruits to other countries. 

    via GIPHY

    3. Almond milk

    As much as people love almond milk as a healthier and, some say, better tasting substitute to regular milk, its production also has a significant environmental impact.

    According to the Guardian, more than 80% of the world's almonds come what are fha fixed interest rates today California — a region known for some of the worst droughts in US history.

    Growing just one almond requires 1.1 gallons (5 litres) of water. To produce 100 ml of almost milk, it takes 100 litres of water.

    Read More: This Country Is Leading the World in Ending Food Waste

    4. Sugar

    We all know that sugar is bad for us. However, not only does sugar do harm to our bodies and our health but, according to a World Wild Fund (WWF) report, it also does harm to our planet.

    The report, “Sugar and the Environment”, says that more than 145 million tonnes of sugar are produced in 121 countries each year. 

    But the production of this sugar destroys natural habitats, requires intensive use of water and the use of damaging agro-chemicals, and causes air pollution.

    In the Indian state of Maharashtra, for example, sugarcane covers 3% of the land — but it corners 60% of the irrigation supply, and so causes substantial groundwater loss in the area.

    Read More:  3 Changes You Should Make to Your Diet to Eat More Sustainably

    5. Soy beans

    Soy beans mainly grow in Latin America — but the rising demand is causing deforestation across the region. 

    Almost 4 million hectares of forest land are destroyed every year, according to the Telegraph, with victims including the Amazon, the Gran Chaco, and the Atlantic forests. 

    With soy increasingly being used in place of dairy products — which can also have a devastating impact — it goes to show that even with the best of intentions, when it comes to the global food industry there are few guarantees that we’ll get it right. 

    via GIPHY

    6. Rice

    One staple food item you’re likely to find as a prominent part of dishes in a lot of countries across the world is rice. 

    While more than half of the world’s population depend on it as a food source, the production of rice accounts for as much as a third of the planet’s annual freshwater, according to a report from Oxfam. To produce a kilo of rice, for example, it takes 2,497 litres of water, according to the Guardian. 

    What’s more, research into a rapid global rise in methane emissions in 2016 surprisingly found that some of the increase can be pinned on the activities of microbes in wetlands and rice paddies. 

    Read More: This New Juice Range Uses Ugly Fruit and Veg to Cut Waste

    7. Beef

    Beef has become something of a villain when it comes to the negative impacts of our global foodindustry.

    Beef production needs about 28 times more land than the production of pork or chicken, and requires 11 times more water. 

    When you compare it to other food items such as rice, for example, and potatoes or wheat, beef needs 160 times more land, and releases 11 times more greenhouse gases.

    You can read more about the negative impact of beef production here. 

    Read More:One Simple Thing You Can Do to Reduce the Impact of Food Waste

    8. Coffee

    If beef are bananas good for you uk a hard one for meat lovers to digest, then coffee lovers are not going to like this bit. 

    Coffee is the second most traded commodity in the world and, for many of us, it’s one of life’s essentials. 

    For coffee, most of the environmental damage comes in finding space to grow the beans. Most commonly, coffee beans are produced in Latin America. Yet, with an increased demand, farmers have cleared 2.5 million acres of forest in Central America to make way for production.

    A report by the WWF highlights the link between coffee productions and environmental damage — showing that 37 of the worst 50 countries for deforestation rates are also coffee producers. 

    via GIPHY

    TopicsEnvironmentFood & HungerClimate changecambio climaticoWasteSustainableDeforestationGreenhouse Gasesalimentos malos bridgewater savings bank east bridgewater hours el medio ambiente

    Источник: https://www.globalcitizen.org/en/content/8-foods-you-probably-didnt-know-were-bad-for-the-e/

    5 A Day portion sizes - Eat well

    Portion sizes for different foods

    Credit:

    Everyone should have at least 5 portions of a variety of fruit and vegetables every day. An adult portion of fruit or vegetables is 80g.

    The guide below will give you an indication of typical portion sizes for adults.

    Children should also eat at least 5 are bananas good for you uk of a variety of fruit and vegetables a day.

    The amount of food a child needs varies with age, body size and levels of physical activity.

    As a rough guide, 1 portion is the amount they can fit in the palm of their hand.

    5 A Day fruit portions

    Small-sized fresh fruit

    A portion is 2 or more small fruit – for example, 2 plums, 2 satsumas, 2 kiwi fruit, 3 apricots, 6 lychees, 7 strawberries or 14 cherries.

    Medium-sized fresh fruit

    A portion is 1 piece of fruit, such as 1 apple, banana, pear, orange or nectarine.

    Large fresh fruit

    A portion is half a grapefruit, 1 slice of papaya, 1 slice of melon (5cm slice), 1 large slice of pineapple or 2 slices of mango (5cm slices).

    Dried fruit

    A portion of dried fruit is around 30g. This is about 1 heaped tablespoon of raisins, currants or sultanas, 1 tablespoon of mixed fruit, 2 figs, 3 prunes or 1 handful of dried banana chips. 

    But dried fruit can be high in sugar and can be bad for your teeth.

    Try to swap dried fruit for fresh fruit, especially between meals.

    To reduce the risk of tooth decay, dried fruit is best enjoyed as part of a meal – as dessert, for example, not as a between meal snack.

    Tinned or canned fruit

    A portion is roughly the same quantity of fruit that you would eat for a fresh portion, such as 2 pear or peach halves, 6 apricot halves or 8 segments of tinned grapefruit.

    Choose fruit canned in natural juice, rather than syrup.

    5 A Day vegetable portions

    Green vegetables

    A portion is 2 broccoli spears or 4 heaped tablespoons of cooked kale, spinach, spring greens or green beans.

    Cooked vegetables

    A portion is 3 heaped tablespoons of cooked vegetables, such as carrots, peas or sweetcorn, or 8 cauliflower florets.

    Salad vegetables

    A portion is 1.5 full-length celery sticks, a 5cm piece of cucumber, 1 medium tomato or 7 cherry tomatoes.

    Tinned and frozen vegetables

    Roughly the same quantity as you would eat for a fresh portion. For example, 3 heaped tablespoons of tinned or frozen carrots, peas or sweetcorn count as 1 portion each.

    For tinned, choose those canned in water with no added salt or sugar.

    Pulses and beans

    A portion is 3 heaped tablespoons of baked beans, haricot beans, kidney beans, cannellini beans, butter beans or chickpeas.

    Remember, however much you eat, beans and pulses count as a maximum of 1 portion a day.

    Potatoes

    Potatoes don't count towards your 5 A Day. This is the same for yams, cassava and plantain, too. 

    They're classified nutritionally as a starchy food, because when eaten as part of a meal they're usually used in place of other sources of starch, such as bread, rice or pasta. 

    Although they don't count towards your 5 A Day, potatoes do play an important role in your diet as a starchy food.

    You can learn more in 5 A Day: what counts?

    5 A Day in juices and smoothies

    Unsweetened 100% fruit juice, vegetable juice and smoothies can only ever count as a maximum of 1 portion of your 5 A Day.

    For example, if you have 2 glasses of fruit are bananas good for you uk and a smoothie in 1 day, that still only counts as 1 portion.

    Smoothies include any drink made up of any combination of fruit or vegetable juice, purée, or all the edible pulped fruit or vegetable.

    Your combined total of drinks from fruit juice, vegetable juice and smoothies shouldn't be more than 150ml a day, which is a small glass.

    For example, if you have 150ml of orange juice and 150ml smoothie in 1 day, you'll have exceeded the recommendation by 150ml.

    When fruit is blended or juiced, it releases the sugars. This increases the risk of tooth decay, so it's best to drink fruit juice or smoothies at mealtimes.

    Whole fruits are less likely to cause tooth decay because the sugars are contained within the structure of the fruit.

    Watch out for drinks that say "juice drink" on the pack as they're unlikely to count towards your 5 A Day and can be high in sugar.

    5 A Day and ready-made foods

    Fruit and vegetables contained in shop-bought ready-made foods can also count toward your 5 A Day.

    Always read the label. Some ready-made foods contain high levels of fat, salt and sugar, so only have them occasionally or in small amounts as part of a healthy, balanced diet.

    Find out more about food labels

    Got a question about 5 A Day?

    If you have a query about 5 A Day check our 5 A Day FAQs.

    Video: how much is 5 A Day?

    In this video, a dietitian gives advice on exactly how much is 1 portion of fruit or vegetables.

    Media last reviewed: 1 May 2021
    Media review due: 1 May 2024

    Page last reviewed: 18 September 2018
    Next review due: 18 September 2021

    Источник: https://www.nhs.uk/live-well/eat-well/5-a-day-portion-sizes/

    Diet and nutrition

    Why is a healthy diet important?

    Eating a healthy diet is important for both physical and mental wellbeing. It gives your body the nutrients it customer service walmart com to grow, repair, and work well. 

    By staying in good general health, more treatment options could be available to you. It can also help you tolerate higher doses of chemotherapy and protect you from infection.

    It’s important to continue to eat well after your treatment to help in your recovery, too. Getting the nutrients you need helps to keep your strength and energy up, and can lower the risk of developing other cancers and illnesses.

    What is a healthy diet?

    The UK government publish the Eatwell Guide, which gives general guidance on healthy eating.

    Eatwell Guide with fruit and vegetables, carbohydrates, protein, dairy and fats

    The Vegetarian Society have produced a version for people who eat a vegetarian diet that does not contain fish or meat. The Vegan Society also give guidance on nutrition for those following a vegan diet.

    Your diet should include carbohydrates, protein, fruit and vegetables, dairy (or dairy alternatives), vitamins and minerals, fibre and fat.

    Carbohydrates (starchy foods)

    Carbohydrates are the main source of your body’s energy. They also provide fibre, which is important for digestion. Carbohydrates should make up around a third of your daily food intake.

    Foods high in carbohydrates include rice, potatoes, bread and pasta. For a healthy and higher fibre option, choose brown, wholegrain or wholemeal varieties. Grains, such as quinoa and cous cous, also provide a source of carbohydrate.

    Protein

    Protein is important for your body to grow and repair, as well as to maintain muscle mass. You might need more protein than usual to help your body heal during and after your treatment for lymphoma. If you are losing weight and muscle mass, seek advice from a member of your medical team.

    Foods that are high in protein include fish, eggs, beans, lentils, nuts, seeds, nut butters and hummus. Dairy products, such as milk, yoghurt and cheese, also contain protein.

    Meat is a good source of protein. For a healthier meat option, choose lean (little fat), grilled cuts of meat. As well as providing protein, red meat fcbc nyc church online also a good source of the minerals iron and zinc.

    Some research reports a link between cancer and eating a lot of red meat (such as lamb, pork and beef) and processed meats (such as sausages, bacon and cured meats). The government advises limiting the amount of red and processed meats you eat to 70g per day. World Cancer Research Fund gives some ideas to help you cut down on red and processed meats. 

    Cancer Research UK gives more information about the association between some meats and cancer. 

    Aim to eat two portions of fish a week. One of these should be an oily fish such as salmon, mackerel or trout. If you are pregnant, the current NHS guidance recommends not to eat more than two portions of oily fish a week.

    Include dairy products (made from milk) in your diet. Dairy provides calcium (important for bone health), zinc (a mineral with various functions, including helping wounds heal) and protein. 

    Milk, yoghurts and cheese are good sources of dairy. For a healthy option, choose low-fat dairy products, including low-fat spreads instead of butter, which is high in saturated fat. If you are trying to gain weight, however, you might find it helps to eat some of the higher fat options. 

    If you have a low number of white blood cells (neutropenia), avoid products that contain living bacteria. This includes ‘probiotic’ or ‘live’ yoghurts and yoghurt drinks, unpasteurised dairy products, blue-veined cheeses and mould-ripened cheeses. 

    If you are lactose intolerant or follow a vegan diet, you can meet your calcium requirements with non-dairy alternatives, such as coconut milk, dairy-free yoghurts and soya products. The NHS website offers more information about dairy alternatives.

    Fat

    Fat is an important source of energy and vitamins. 

    Unsaturated (‘good’) fats can help keep your heart healthy and lower your cholesterol. Avocados, brazil nuts and oily fish are examples of sources of unsaturated fats. You can also include unsaturated fat in your diet by cooking with oils or using oils as a dressing.

    Limit your intake of saturated (‘sat’) fats. This type of fat is found in foods such as butter, meat, cakes, and many processed foods, such as sausages and crisps. It’s fine to have a little bit of saturated fat. Women should eat no more than 20g a day; men should eat no more than 30g a day. Too much of this type of fat increases health risks including heart disease and stroke.

    Check the nutritional information given on the packaging of products to see how much of each type of fat it contains. There are also apps available to help you to check nutritional content, for example, the government’s food scanner app.

    Vitamins and minerals

    Vitamins and minerals have many different functions, including keeping your immune system, bones, teeth and skin healthy. Minerals are important for the strength of your teeth and bones. They also help change the food you eat into energy you use.

    Fruits and vegetables are good sources of vitamins and minerals. The recommended intake of fruit and vegetables is at least five different portions (80g) per day. Eating a 30g portion of dried fruit also counts as a portion.

    As a rough guide, the following count as one portion:

    • an apple, banana or slice of melon
    • three heaped tablespoons of cooked vegetables
    • seven cherry tomatoes.

    The NHS website gives more information about what counts as one of your five a day. The World Cancer Research Fund also produce a set of resources that you can download free of charge, including a poster on what a 5 a day portion is.

    If you are concerned about getting enough vitamins and minerals, speak to your doctor. Do not take over-the-counter vitamin and mineral supplements without the advice of a member of your medical team or a dietitian because some can react with other medication.

    Fibre

    Fibre helps with heart and digestive health. It is found in foods that come from plants, for example fruits, vegetables, cereals and potatoes. Aim to my100bank com login 30g of fibre each day. The NHS website gives tips to help get more fibre in your diet.

    Back to top


    How can I eat well during treatment for lymphoma?

    As long as you do not have troublesome symptoms related to your lymphoma or treatment, the general guidance is to eat a healthy, balanced diet. The government’s Eatwell Guide shows the types and amounts of different foods you should include in your diet. The key points are to eat:

    You should also get plenty of fluids each day. The general recommendation is to drink around 1.5 to 2 litres (roughly 6 to 8 glasses) per day. All fluids count, with the exception of alcohol. Be aware, however, that tea and coffee contains caffeine.

    What if I'm struggling to eat and drink?

    If you struggle to eat and drink during or after your treatment, speak to a member of your medical team. They may refer you to a dietitian, who can assess your nutritional wellbeing and tailor advice specific to your needs. You might also be offered nutritional supplements; however, do not take these without seeking medical advice. 

    We offer suggestions to help with difficulties that commonly affect people who are living with lymphoma, including guidance on food safety if you are neutropenic. We also offer basic tips if you have a sore mouth as a side effect of treatment. 

    Elisabet talks about her personal experience with diet and nutrition during and after her lymphoma treatment. Jennifer Pickard, Specialist Dietitian at The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust comments on the importance of healthy eating.

    Loss of appetite or feeling full quickly

    Some medicines and treatments for lymphoma can lower your appetite or make you feel full soon after you start to eat. This could be a side effect of chemotherapy. It capital one current auto loan rates also happen if you have lymphoma in your gut or if you have radiotherapy to your gut.

    If you find it difficult to eat very much, you may find the following tips helpful:

    • Don’t drink anything at least 30 minutes before your food to avoid filling up just before you eat.
    • Serve your food on a smaller plate – a large plateful can be off-putting.
    • Eat little and often, with small snacks between meals.
    • Choose high-energy foods (such as omelettes, cheese and biscuits) instead of those that are filling but often low in energy (such as salads and soups).
    • Fortify your meals with high energy foods such as olive oil, cream, cheese or milk powder.

    Macmillan Cancer Support give more advice on adding energy and protein to everyday foods.

    You can also find information to help you cope with the impact of side effects on your diet and nutrition from the World Cancer Research Fund. They produce a set of resources, including a booklet about how to eat well during cancer. 

    Weight loss and weight gain

    If you have lost weight during your treatment, you can boost your energy intake in the following ways:

    • Choose full-fat options (such as whole milk) over low-fat alternatives.
    • Add cheese or sauces to pasta or vegetables.
    • Add sugar, honey or syrup to drinks and puddings.
    • Add butter or oil to bread, pasta, potatoes and vegetables.

    If you continue to lose weight, ask to be referred to a dietitian. 

    Weight gain winter village bryant park 2015 happen for various reasons including changes to your metabolism or the use of steroids as part of your treatment.

    Although it can be upsetting to gain weight, continue to eat a healthy diet. Your weight should return to normal once you stop taking steroids.

    If you are concerned about weight, speak to your medical team.

    Nausea and sickness

    Nausea (feeling or being sick) is a common side effect of many chemotherapy drugs. You may also feel nauseous with radiotherapy. 

    If you experience nausea and sickness, you could ask your medical team if they can offer you anti-sickness medication (antiemetics).

    To help with nausea:

    • eat dry plain foods such as crackers, toast or rice
    • add ginger to your diet, for example in the form of ginger beer, ginger tea, ginger biscuits, or root ginger
    • eat food cold or cook it in a microwave. This minimises the smell of food, which could worsen nausea.

    Changes in taste

    A side effect of some medications, including chemotherapy and some targeted therapies, is that food tastes different. Many people say food tastes bland. Other people describe a metallic taste in their mouth. It’s also are bananas good for you uk common for food to taste more salty, bitter or sweet than usual.

    If your taste is affected and your mouth is not sore, you could try flavouring savoury food with herbs, spices, sauces and chutneys. A fruit coulis could help to flavour desserts. 

    You might find ‘sharp’ tasting fizzy drinks (such as lemonade or ginger beer) more enjoyable than milder flavours. However, milk-based drinks are more nourishing, providing protein, vitamins and minerals as well as energy.

    Many people stop enjoying tea and coffee during their treatment for lymphoma. If this is the case for you, you could try herbal teas.

    During your treatment, you may be more at risk of developing infections, such as oral thrush. This can make food taste unpleasant. To avoid infection, keep good mouth care. Brush your teeth regularly with a soft bristled brush and use an alcohol-free mouthwash.

    The effects of treatment on your taste may change over time. For example, foods that you didn’t enjoy earlier in your treatment might start to taste good again, although this can take some time. Once you finish treatment, taste changes should start to fade, so try to re-introduce any foods that you stopped enjoying.

    Diarrhoea

    Diarrhoea can be a side effect of some treatments for lymphoma. Eating little and often can be a helpful approach. Drink plenty of fluids to prevent dehydration while you have diarrhoea. Soup, jelly and ice lollies are sources of fluids, too. 

    Be aware of symptoms of dehydration, which include passing urine less often or passing only small amounts of dark coloured urine. 

    If diarrhoea affects you, speak to your doctor or nurse. They might give you medication to help and can advise on whether to make changes to your diet. You could also speak to them about the possibility of getting a referral to a dietitian.

    Constipation

    Constipation is a side effect of some chemotherapy drugs, anti-sickness medications (antiemetics) and pain relief medication, especially morphine-based ones, such as codeine.

    Talk to your doctor or nurse about whether it is suitable for you to take laxatives and, if so, which ones. You might also find that you can ease constipation by increasing the sacramento food bank donation hours of fibre in your diet. Drinking plenty of fluids and taking gentle exercise might also help. 

    Back to top


    FAQs about diet and lymphoma

    We answer some common questions people have about diet and lymphoma. Speak to your medical team for advice specific to your situation.

    Are there certain foods that could help cure lymphoma?

    From time to time, you might come across news stories about whether certain foods can prevent or cure cancer. Unfortunately, there is no evidence that food can cure cancer – be wary of claims that it can. 

    Cancer Research UK have information about alternative cancer diets, including Gerson therapy (coffee enemas) and macrobiotic diets (made up of vegetarian foods). They amazon discount code against following an alternative cancer diet. In addition to the lack of scientific evidence to say that any work, some could make you very unwell and lead to nutritional deficiencies.

    Should I take supplements?

    If you are able to eat a healthy balanced diet, the general guidance is that you do not need to take additional vitamin or mineral supplements. If you have difficulties eating, your doctor might advise you to take an additional general multivitamin and mineral supplement. It’s important to check with them before taking supplements. Some are harmful if taken in high doses and can react with other medications and treatment for lymphoma. 

    Are there foods I should avoid if my immune system is lowered?

    If your immune system is lowered, doctors may say you are ‘immunosuppressed’. This makes you more vulnerable to infection. If you have human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) or if you have a low britannica great books of the western world ebay of white blood cells (neutropenia), you are immunosuppressed. Speak to your medical team for advice about any foods you should avoid are bananas good for you uk reduce your risk of infection.

    Will sugar make my lymphoma worse?

    Some people worry that sugar could ‘feed’ their lymphoma. There is no evidence that eating sugar makes lymphoma, or any type of cancer, grow. There are also no research findings to say that if you do not eat sugar, your lymphoma will go away. 

    Eating a lot of sugar brings other health risks, however, including obesity, which is linked to the development of other cancer types. A healthy diet means eating sugar in moderation. In general, sugary foods (such as cakes, biscuits and honey) provide little nutritional goodness and can lead to weight gain. If you are losing weight unintentionally, however, you may need to temporarily increase your intake of foods that are high in sugar and fat. Your doctor can advise you on this.

    Cancer Research UK has more information about sugar and cancer.

    Is it OK to eat a vegetarian or vegan diet?

    If you follow a vegetarian or vegan diet, you can still meet your nutritional requirements. Include a variety of carbohydrate foods, protein, fruit and vegetables in your diet. 

    Vegetarian sources are bananas good for you uk protein include dairy products, eggs and tofu. Vegan sources include pulses, nuts and soya products.

    Ensure, too, that you get enough iron. You can do this by eating pulses and dark green, leafy vegetables. If you eat a vegan diet, you should also consider taking a Vitamin B12 supplement to avoid developing a deficiency. 

    The Vegetarian Society and The Vegan Society give further guidance relevant to these diets.

    Should I eat organic foods?

    Organic food is produced with restricted use of man-made fertilisers and pesticides. In the UK, this is set by the Department for Agriculture and Rural Affairs (DEFRA). 

    Some people choose to eat an organic diet because they are concerned about traces of pesticides and herbicides left in food. These levels are closely monitored and reviewed with the aim of keeping them well below the level considered to be safe.

    Some research shows that organically grown crops contain higher levels of antioxidants. Antioxidants absorb free radicals, which can damage cells. However, there is not yet research to say whether eating more antioxidants in food reduces the risk of cancer. In addition, taking antioxidant supplements could have harmful effects.

    In summary, there is no good quality evidence to support that eating organic foods can prevent cancer or stop cancer recurring. For example:

    • In 2014, Cancer Research UK reported findings of their research looking into whether women who ate mostly or wholly organic foods were less likely to develop cancer than those who never ate organic foods. Among the 600,000 women who took part, they found no overall difference in risk between the two groups. An exception was in relation to non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). The researchers state that the risk of developing NHL is possibly lower in those who eat organic foods, but further investigation is needed.
    • A study carried out in France looked at 69,000 people. It found a lower risk of cancer in those who ate the most organic foods compared to those who ate the least. The largest effect was seen with lymphoma – particularly non-Hodgkin lymphoma. As the number of cases was very low, however, scientists are unable to draw conclusions. 

    Is it safe to eat grapefruit?

    You may have heard that it is unsafe to eat grapefruit while you are having treatment for lymphoma.

    Some foods affect how well drugs work. Before they can take effect, drugs first need to be broken down and absorbed into your bloodstream. Proteins called ‘enzymes’, particularly one known as ‘CYP3A’, are important in this process. Foods that block the action of these enzymes lower the amount of the drug that is absorbed into your body, making it less effective.

    Grapefruit can block CYP3A. You may, therefore, be advised to avoid eating grapefruit or drinking grapefruit juice while you are having treatment for lymphoma. Other fruits that may block CYP3A include Seville oranges, blackberries, pomegranates and some varieties of grape.

    Your consultant can advise you on whether to avoid particular foods and drinks based on your specific treatment.

    Is green tea helpful for people with lymphoma?

    Green tea is made from the leaves of Camellia sinensis, a plant that grows in China and India. Scientists think green tea could have the potential to prevent some cancers and to stop cancer cells from growing. However, far more research is needed. In addition, Cancer Research UK caution that there may be other risks associated with increased antioxidant consumption, for example, lowering the body’s ability to fight disease.

    A study of over 40,000 adults in Japan found a 42% lower rate of blood cancers (including non-Hodgkin lymphoma) in people who drank five or more cups of green tea each day compared to zero or one cup a day. Some scientists believe that the high level of antioxidants in green tea may account for this. However, limitations to this study mean that firm conclusions cannot be drawn. 

    A review carried out in 2016 looked at 51 studies with a total of over 1.6 million people. There was no conclusive evidence to make a link between drinking green tea and preventing cancer.

    Is it safe to drink green tea?

    There hasn’t been thorough testing to answer this question with certainty. However, in general, it’s thought that moderate consumption of green tea is safe for people with lymphoma. You should, however, check with your doctors whether it could affect your treatment – for example, researchers have reported that green tea could stop the drug bortezomib (Velcade®) working as well as it would do otherwise. Findings so far have come only from animal studies and more research is needed to tell whether this also applies to humans.

    Can Echinacea help me?

    Some people believe that the herb, Echinacea (purple coneflower) can boost immunity, fight cancer and improve side effects of chemotherapy and radiotherapy. At the moment, there is no evidence to support these ideas. If you would like to take Echinacea, speak to a member of your medical team about doing so first.

    Is it safe to eat chili peppers?

    Chili peppers contain capsaicin, which is what makes your mouth feel hot when you eat them. Although far more research is needed, early findings suggest that there may be a link with cancer. Capsaicin could possibly help to treat some cancers but may lead to other types of cancer. No links have yet been made with lymphoma.

    Can I eat out?

    You may feel anxious about eating out if you have difficulties eating. If your appetite is lowered, you could order a starter instead of a main course or order a child’s portion.

    If you have a low number of neutrophils (neutropenia), take extra care to follow food safety advice when eating out. You can check the food hygiene rating of pubs, clubs, take-aways and restaurants at the scores on the doors website.

    Is it safe to diet while I am having treatment for lymphoma?

    Generally, you should not try to lose weight during treatment because doing so can make it harder for your immune system to recover from treatment. 

    Steroids can stimulate your appetite, and cause fluid retention, leading to weight gain. Your weight should return to normal once you stop taking steroids.

    If you are thinking of dieting, speak to your doctor for advice on whether it is safe to do so.

    Back to top

    1. American Institute capital one 360 login auto Cancer Research. The spices of cancer prevention, 2013. Available at: aicr.org/cancer-research-update/august_21_2013/CRU_spices_cancer_prevention.html (Accessed April 2019).

    2. Bailey, DG. et al. Grapefruit–medication interactions: Forbidden fruit or avoidable consequences? 2013. Canadian Medical Association Journal, 185: 309–316. Available at: cmaj.ca/content/185/4/309.short (Accessed April 2019).

    3. Baudry, J. et al. Association of frequency of organic food consumption with cancer risk. Findings from the NutriNet-Santé prospective cohort study. Jama internal medicine, 2018. 178: 1597–1606. Available at: jamanetwork.com/journals/jamainternalmedicine/article-abstract/2707948 (Accessed April 2019).

    4. Bode, AM and Dong, Z. The two faces of capsaicin, 2011. Available at: cancerres.aacrjournals.org/content/71/8/2809 (Accessed April 2019).

    5. Boehm, K. et al. Green tea (Camellia sinensis) are bananas good for you uk the prevention of cancer, 2009. Cochrane database of systematic reviews. Available at: cochranelibrary.com/cdsr/doi/10.1002/14651858.CD005004.pub2/epdf/standard (Accessed April 2019).

    6. Cancer Research UK. Pnc bank minimum deposit to open account, 2019. Available at: www.cancerresearchuk.org/about-cancer/cancer-in-general/treatment/complementary-alternative-therapies/individual-therapies/echinacea (Accessed April 2019).

    7. Cancer Research UK. Green tea (Chinese tea), 2015. Available at: www.cancerresearchuk.org/about-cancer/cancer-in-general/treatment/complementary-alternative-therapies/individual-therapies/green-tea?_ga=2.105296772.625410314.1554212043-1106683717.1544532677 (Accessed April 2019).

    8. Cancer Research UK. Organic food doesn’t lower overall cancer risk, 2014. Available at: www.cancerresearchuk.org/about-us/cancer-news/press-release/2014-03-28-organic-food-doesnt-lower-overall-cancer-risk?_ga=2.118010766.625410314.1554212043-1106683717.1544532677 (Accessed April 2019).

    9. Can-Lan, S et al. Green tea, black tea and breast cancer risk: a meta-analysis of epidemiological studies. Available at: academic.oup.com/carcin/article/27/7/1310/2390988 (Accessed April 2019).

    10. Chacko, SM et al. Beneficial effects of green tea: A literature review, Chinese Medical Journal, 2010. 5: 13. Available at: ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2855614/ (Accessed April 2019).

    11. Clark, R and Seong-Ho, L. Anticancer properties of capsaicin against human cancer. Journal of pharmacology and experimental therapeutics, 2018. 364: 462–473. Available at: ar.iiarjournals.org/content/36/3/837.full (Accessed April 2019).

    12. Golden, EB et al. Green tea polyphenols block the anticancer effects of bortezomib and other boronic acid–based proteasome inhibitors. Blood, 2009. 113: 5927–5937. Available at: bloodjournal.org/content/113/23/5927?ijkey=330b31902dc2697aced1f49b3f795b68f6ab8e11&keytype2=tf_ipsecsha&sso-checked=true (Accessed April 2019).

    13. Gratus, C et al. The use of herbal medicines by people with sacramento food bank donation hours in the UK: a systematic review of the literature, 2009. 102: 831–842. Available at: academic.oup.com/qjmed/article/102/12/831/1563244#22740948 (Accessed April 2019).

    14. Lobo, V et al. Free radicals, antioxidants and functional foods: Impact on human health. Pharmacognosy Review, 2010: 118–126. Available bank of the west berkeley hours ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3249911/ (Accessed April 2019).

    15. Mallhi TH, et al. Effect of Fruit/Vegetable-Drug Interactions on CYP450, OATP and p-Glycoprotein: A Systematic Review, 2015. 14: 1927–1935. Available at: bioline.org.br/pdf?pr15252 (Accessed April 2019).

    16. Miller, SC. Echinacea: a miracle herb against aging and cancer? Evidence in vivo in mice. Evidence-based complementary and alternative medicine, 2005. 2: 309–314. Available at: ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1193558/ (Accessed April 2019).

    17. Naganuma, T et al. Green tea consumption and Hematologic malignancies in Japan: The Ohsaki study. American Journal of epidemiology, 2009. 170: 730–738. Available at: academic.oup.com/aje/article/170/6/730/123581 (Accessed April 2019).

    18. National Cancer Institute. Antioxidants and cancer prevention, 2017. Available at: cancer.gov/about-cancer/causes-prevention/risk/diet/antioxidants-fact-sheet (Accessed April 2019).

    19. Newcastle University. Organic vs. non-organic food, 2015. Available at: ncl.ac.uk/press/articles/archive/2015/10/organicvsnon-organicfood/ (Accessed April 2019).

    20. NHS. Eating organic food linked with lower cancer risk, 2018. Available at: nhs.uk/news/cancer/eating-organic-food-linked-lower-cancer-risk/ (Accessed April 2019).

    21. Pilkington, K and the CAM Cancer Consortium. Echinacea spp, 2019. Available at: cam-cancer.org/en/echinacea-spp (Accessed April 2019).

    22. Rock, CL et al. Nutrition and physical activity guidelines for cancer survivors, 2012. CA: a cancer journal for clinicians. Available at: onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.3322/caac.21142 (Accessed April 2019).

    23. Winter, CK and Davis, SF. Organic foods. American state bank online of food science, 2006. 71: 1750–3841. Available at: onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/j.1750-3841.2006.00196.x (Accessed April 2019).

    Источник: https://lymphoma-action.org.uk/about-lymphoma-living-and-beyond-lymphoma/diet-and-nutrition

    Are bananas good for you uk -

    There's a very good reason you receive a banana at the finish line of pretty much every race.

    Bananas have built themselves quite the reputation as a go-to, pre- and post-workout snack, largely because they are high in the electrolyte potassium. They're also a great source of easily digestible carbohydrates. Oh, and they're delicious.

    Despite the good reputation bananas carry, you may have heard some internet "experts" trying to slander their name.

    Bananas are higher in sugar than some other fruits, these "experts" say. For that reason, they also contain more calories. And for that reason, you should avoid eating bananas to avoid eating too many calories so that you can lose weight.

    But, wait, hold up. Is that really true?

    Here’s what legit experts have to say.

    Are Bananas Good for Weight Loss?

    izusek

    “Bananas have an undeserved bad reputation for being too high in sugar, when they’re extremely nutritious. Sure, they are higher in sugar than many other fruits, but the sugar we’re talking about here is natural sugar, not added—like in a candy bar,” says Charlotte Martin, MS, RDN, CSOWM, CPT.

    So, the sugar from a banana isn’t bad for you, and it’s totally fine to eat bananas in moderation if you want to lose weight.

    Are Bananas Good for a Healthy Diet?

    As for nutritional content, one medium banana contains a little over three grams of fiber and 12 percent of your daily value for potassium.

    Both fiber and potassium support heart health, says Martin. Plus, fiber helps you feel full and feeling full helps prevent you from snacking on empty calories.

    Total carbohydrate needs vary from person to person, but you can still lose weight on a high-arbohydrate diet as long as the calories you’re taking in are less than the calories you’re burning.

    This content is imported from {embed-name}. You may be able to find the same content in another format, or you may be able to find more information, at their web site.

    "I recommend everyone, especially those looking to lose weight, consume most of their sugar intake from natural sources, like bananas and other fruits," Martin says.

    How Many Bananas Should I Eat Daily?

    Anjelika Gretskaia

    Again, fruit sugar sources are in the company of fiber, which is the type of carbohydrate you want to maximize in your diet.

    “I typically recommend the average person looking to maintain or lose weight aim for two servings of fruit per day. However, if you’re extremely active and/or have increased calorie needs you may want to increase that amount,” she says.

    And when it comes to bananas and weight loss, make the most of your fruit by pairing with protein to help increase satiety and stabilize blood sugar levels. Think: string cheese, nut butter, or yogurt.

    This content is created and maintained by a third party, and imported onto this page to help users provide their email addresses. You may be able to find more information about this and similar content at piano.io

    Источник: https://www.menshealth.com/nutrition/a32406556/bananas-weight-loss/

    Are Bananas Fattening or Weight-Loss-Friendly?

    People who want to improve their health are often advised to eat more fruits and vegetables.

    However, some people worry that high sugar fruits like bananas can be fattening. Most fruits contain about 90% carbs, which means they’re higher in sugar. Still, fruits are an essential part of a balanced diet because they provide vital nutritional benefits.

    This article explores whether bananas will make you gain or lose weight.

    Nutrition facts of bananas

    Bananas are high in many nutrients and provide many health benefits.

    They contain lots of fiber and carbs as well as some essential vitamins and minerals.

    A medium banana contains ():

    • Potassium: 9% DV
    • Vitamin B6: 25% DV
    • Vitamin C: 11% DV
    • Magnesium: 8% DV
    • Copper: 10% DV
    • Manganese: 14% DV
    • Fiber: 3.07 grams

    All this comes with about 105 calories, 90% of which are from carbs. Most of the carbs in ripe bananas are sugars — sucrose, glucose and fructose.

    On the other hand, bananas are low in both fat and protein.

    Bananas also contain a number of beneficial plant compounds and antioxidants, including dopamine and catechin (, , ).

    Summary

    Bananas contain carbs, fiber, and some essential nutrients and antioxidants. A medium banana provides about 105 calories.

    Bananas are high in fiber but low in calories

    Calorie for calorie, bananas contain a lot of fiber.

    One medium banana provides around 7% of your recommended daily intake, with just 105 calories.

    Fiber is important for maintaining regular bowel habits and plays a vital role in digestive health (, ).

    Eating large amounts of fiber has even been linked to a reduced risk of heart disease, diverticular disease, and some cancers (, , , , , ).

    An adequate fiber intake is also linked to reduced body weight (, ).

    One study from 2009 measured the food intake of 252 women for 20 months. The researchers found that for every extra gram of fiber the women ate per day, their body weight was around 0.55 pounds (0.25 kg) lower ().

    Scientists believe this may occur because fiber makes you feel full longer, which may help you eat fewer calories in the long term.

    Summary

    Bananas are a good source of fiber. A high fiber intake has been linked to reduced body weight and a number of other health benefits.

    The greener the banana, the higher the resistant starch

    The type of carbs in a banana depends on how ripe it is.

    Unripe green bananas are high in starch and resistant starch, while ripe yellow bananas contain mostly naturally occurring sugars.

    Resistant starches are long chains of glucose (starch) that are resistant to digestion. They act like soluble fiber in the body and offer lots of potential health benefits, including weight loss and reduced blood sugar levels (16, , , ).

    Resistant starch can also slow down the absorption of sugar from foods. This keeps your blood sugar levels stable and helps you feel full (, , ).

    Additionally, resistant starch may increase fat burning (, ).

    Summary

    Green unripe bananas contain resistant starch, which has been linked to weight loss and reduced blood sugar levels.

    Bananas have a low glycemic index, but it depends on ripeness

    The glycemic index (GI) is a measure of how much foods raise blood sugar levels. If a food scores lower than 55, it’s considered to have a low GI. A score of 56–69 is medium, and 70 or above is high.

    Foods that contain a lot of simple sugars are quickly absorbed and have a high GI value since they cause a greater rise in blood sugar levels.

    Eating a lot of high GI foods has been linked to weight gain and an increased risk of obesity, type 2 diabetes, heart disease, and stroke (, , , , , , ).

    Foods with more slowly absorbed carbs have a lower GI and keep your blood sugar levels stable. Since bananas are 90% carbs, they’re sometimes considered a high sugar fruit that could spike your blood sugar.

    However, the GI score of bananas is 42–62, depending on ripeness. This means they’re low to medium on the glycemic index (31).

    Ripe bananas have a higher GI than greener bananas. The sugar content increases as the banana matures, which in turn affects your blood sugar levels.

    In general, bananas seem to release their sugars slowly.

    In one study of people with type 2 diabetes and high cholesterol, adding 9 ounces (250 grams) of banana to participants’ breakfast for 4 weeks significantly reduced their fasting blood sugar and cholesterol levels ().

    Low GI foods like bananas may also help you feel full and keep blood sugar levels stable. This may lead to weight loss over time ().

    Summary

    Bananas have a low to medium glycemic index (GI) value. Their sugar content and blood sugar-raising effects increase as they ripen.

    The bottom line

    Bananas are healthy and nutritious. They’re high in fiber and low in calories.

    Most bananas have a low to medium glycemic index and should not cause big spikes in blood sugar levels compared with other high carb foods.

    Although there are no studies that directly examine the effects of bananas on weight, bananas have several properties that should make them a weight-loss-friendly food.

    If you’re trying to lose weight, there is absolutely nothing wrong with eating bananas as a part of a balanced diet rich in whole foods.

    Источник: https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/bananas-and-weight

    Diet and nutrition

    Why is a healthy diet important?

    Eating a healthy diet is important for both physical and mental wellbeing. It gives your body the nutrients it needs to grow, repair, and work well. 

    By staying in good general health, more treatment options could be available to you. It can also help you tolerate higher doses of chemotherapy and protect you from infection.

    It’s important to continue to eat well after your treatment to help in your recovery, too. Getting the nutrients you need helps to keep your strength and energy up, and can lower the risk of developing other cancers and illnesses.

    What is a healthy diet?

    The UK government publish the Eatwell Guide, which gives general guidance on healthy eating.

    Eatwell Guide with fruit and vegetables, carbohydrates, protein, dairy and fats

    The Vegetarian Society have produced a version for people who eat a vegetarian diet that does not contain fish or meat. The Vegan Society also give guidance on nutrition for those following a vegan diet.

    Your diet should include carbohydrates, protein, fruit and vegetables, dairy (or dairy alternatives), vitamins and minerals, fibre and fat.

    Carbohydrates (starchy foods)

    Carbohydrates are the main source of your body’s energy. They also provide fibre, which is important for digestion. Carbohydrates should make up around a third of your daily food intake.

    Foods high in carbohydrates include rice, potatoes, bread and pasta. For a healthy and higher fibre option, choose brown, wholegrain or wholemeal varieties. Grains, such as quinoa and cous cous, also provide a source of carbohydrate.

    Protein

    Protein is important for your body to grow and repair, as well as to maintain muscle mass. You might need more protein than usual to help your body heal during and after your treatment for lymphoma. If you are losing weight and muscle mass, seek advice from a member of your medical team.

    Foods that are high in protein include fish, eggs, beans, lentils, nuts, seeds, nut butters and hummus. Dairy products, such as milk, yoghurt and cheese, also contain protein.

    Meat is a good source of protein. For a healthier meat option, choose lean (little fat), grilled cuts of meat. As well as providing protein, red meat is also a good source of the minerals iron and zinc.

    Some research reports a link between cancer and eating a lot of red meat (such as lamb, pork and beef) and processed meats (such as sausages, bacon and cured meats). The government advises limiting the amount of red and processed meats you eat to 70g per day. World Cancer Research Fund gives some ideas to help you cut down on red and processed meats. 

    Cancer Research UK gives more information about the association between some meats and cancer. 

    Aim to eat two portions of fish a week. One of these should be an oily fish such as salmon, mackerel or trout. If you are pregnant, the current NHS guidance recommends not to eat more than two portions of oily fish a week.

    Include dairy products (made from milk) in your diet. Dairy provides calcium (important for bone health), zinc (a mineral with various functions, including helping wounds heal) and protein. 

    Milk, yoghurts and cheese are good sources of dairy. For a healthy option, choose low-fat dairy products, including low-fat spreads instead of butter, which is high in saturated fat. If you are trying to gain weight, however, you might find it helps to eat some of the higher fat options. 

    If you have a low number of white blood cells (neutropenia), avoid products that contain living bacteria. This includes ‘probiotic’ or ‘live’ yoghurts and yoghurt drinks, unpasteurised dairy products, blue-veined cheeses and mould-ripened cheeses. 

    If you are lactose intolerant or follow a vegan diet, you can meet your calcium requirements with non-dairy alternatives, such as coconut milk, dairy-free yoghurts and soya products. The NHS website offers more information about dairy alternatives.

    Fat

    Fat is an important source of energy and vitamins. 

    Unsaturated (‘good’) fats can help keep your heart healthy and lower your cholesterol. Avocados, brazil nuts and oily fish are examples of sources of unsaturated fats. You can also include unsaturated fat in your diet by cooking with oils or using oils as a dressing.

    Limit your intake of saturated (‘sat’) fats. This type of fat is found in foods such as butter, meat, cakes, and many processed foods, such as sausages and crisps. It’s fine to have a little bit of saturated fat. Women should eat no more than 20g a day; men should eat no more than 30g a day. Too much of this type of fat increases health risks including heart disease and stroke.

    Check the nutritional information given on the packaging of products to see how much of each type of fat it contains. There are also apps available to help you to check nutritional content, for example, the government’s food scanner app.

    Vitamins and minerals

    Vitamins and minerals have many different functions, including keeping your immune system, bones, teeth and skin healthy. Minerals are important for the strength of your teeth and bones. They also help change the food you eat into energy you use.

    Fruits and vegetables are good sources of vitamins and minerals. The recommended intake of fruit and vegetables is at least five different portions (80g) per day. Eating a 30g portion of dried fruit also counts as a portion.

    As a rough guide, the following count as one portion:

    • an apple, banana or slice of melon
    • three heaped tablespoons of cooked vegetables
    • seven cherry tomatoes.

    The NHS website gives more information about what counts as one of your five a day. The World Cancer Research Fund also produce a set of resources that you can download free of charge, including a poster on what a 5 a day portion is.

    If you are concerned about getting enough vitamins and minerals, speak to your doctor. Do not take over-the-counter vitamin and mineral supplements without the advice of a member of your medical team or a dietitian because some can react with other medication.

    Fibre

    Fibre helps with heart and digestive health. It is found in foods that come from plants, for example fruits, vegetables, cereals and potatoes. Aim to eat 30g of fibre each day. The NHS website gives tips to help get more fibre in your diet.

    Back to top


    How can I eat well during treatment for lymphoma?

    As long as you do not have troublesome symptoms related to your lymphoma or treatment, the general guidance is to eat a healthy, balanced diet. The government’s Eatwell Guide shows the types and amounts of different foods you should include in your diet. The key points are to eat:

    You should also get plenty of fluids each day. The general recommendation is to drink around 1.5 to 2 litres (roughly 6 to 8 glasses) per day. All fluids count, with the exception of alcohol. Be aware, however, that tea and coffee contains caffeine.

    What if I'm struggling to eat and drink?

    If you struggle to eat and drink during or after your treatment, speak to a member of your medical team. They may refer you to a dietitian, who can assess your nutritional wellbeing and tailor advice specific to your needs. You might also be offered nutritional supplements; however, do not take these without seeking medical advice. 

    We offer suggestions to help with difficulties that commonly affect people who are living with lymphoma, including guidance on food safety if you are neutropenic. We also offer basic tips if you have a sore mouth as a side effect of treatment. 

    Elisabet talks about her personal experience with diet and nutrition during and after her lymphoma treatment. Jennifer Pickard, Specialist Dietitian at The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust comments on the importance of healthy eating.

    Loss of appetite or feeling full quickly

    Some medicines and treatments for lymphoma can lower your appetite or make you feel full soon after you start to eat. This could be a side effect of chemotherapy. It may also happen if you have lymphoma in your gut or if you have radiotherapy to your gut.

    If you find it difficult to eat very much, you may find the following tips helpful:

    • Don’t drink anything at least 30 minutes before your food to avoid filling up just before you eat.
    • Serve your food on a smaller plate – a large plateful can be off-putting.
    • Eat little and often, with small snacks between meals.
    • Choose high-energy foods (such as omelettes, cheese and biscuits) instead of those that are filling but often low in energy (such as salads and soups).
    • Fortify your meals with high energy foods such as olive oil, cream, cheese or milk powder.

    Macmillan Cancer Support give more advice on adding energy and protein to everyday foods.

    You can also find information to help you cope with the impact of side effects on your diet and nutrition from the World Cancer Research Fund. They produce a set of resources, including a booklet about how to eat well during cancer. 

    Weight loss and weight gain

    If you have lost weight during your treatment, you can boost your energy intake in the following ways:

    • Choose full-fat options (such as whole milk) over low-fat alternatives.
    • Add cheese or sauces to pasta or vegetables.
    • Add sugar, honey or syrup to drinks and puddings.
    • Add butter or oil to bread, pasta, potatoes and vegetables.

    If you continue to lose weight, ask to be referred to a dietitian. 

    Weight gain can happen for various reasons including changes to your metabolism or the use of steroids as part of your treatment.

    Although it can be upsetting to gain weight, continue to eat a healthy diet. Your weight should return to normal once you stop taking steroids.

    If you are concerned about weight, speak to your medical team.

    Nausea and sickness

    Nausea (feeling or being sick) is a common side effect of many chemotherapy drugs. You may also feel nauseous with radiotherapy. 

    If you experience nausea and sickness, you could ask your medical team if they can offer you anti-sickness medication (antiemetics).

    To help with nausea:

    • eat dry plain foods such as crackers, toast or rice
    • add ginger to your diet, for example in the form of ginger beer, ginger tea, ginger biscuits, or root ginger
    • eat food cold or cook it in a microwave. This minimises the smell of food, which could worsen nausea.

    Changes in taste

    A side effect of some medications, including chemotherapy and some targeted therapies, is that food tastes different. Many people say food tastes bland. Other people describe a metallic taste in their mouth. It’s also quite common for food to taste more salty, bitter or sweet than usual.

    If your taste is affected and your mouth is not sore, you could try flavouring savoury food with herbs, spices, sauces and chutneys. A fruit coulis could help to flavour desserts. 

    You might find ‘sharp’ tasting fizzy drinks (such as lemonade or ginger beer) more enjoyable than milder flavours. However, milk-based drinks are more nourishing, providing protein, vitamins and minerals as well as energy.

    Many people stop enjoying tea and coffee during their treatment for lymphoma. If this is the case for you, you could try herbal teas.

    During your treatment, you may be more at risk of developing infections, such as oral thrush. This can make food taste unpleasant. To avoid infection, keep good mouth care. Brush your teeth regularly with a soft bristled brush and use an alcohol-free mouthwash.

    The effects of treatment on your taste may change over time. For example, foods that you didn’t enjoy earlier in your treatment might start to taste good again, although this can take some time. Once you finish treatment, taste changes should start to fade, so try to re-introduce any foods that you stopped enjoying.

    Diarrhoea

    Diarrhoea can be a side effect of some treatments for lymphoma. Eating little and often can be a helpful approach. Drink plenty of fluids to prevent dehydration while you have diarrhoea. Soup, jelly and ice lollies are sources of fluids, too. 

    Be aware of symptoms of dehydration, which include passing urine less often or passing only small amounts of dark coloured urine. 

    If diarrhoea affects you, speak to your doctor or nurse. They might give you medication to help and can advise on whether to make changes to your diet. You could also speak to them about the possibility of getting a referral to a dietitian.

    Constipation

    Constipation is a side effect of some chemotherapy drugs, anti-sickness medications (antiemetics) and pain relief medication, especially morphine-based ones, such as codeine.

    Talk to your doctor or nurse about whether it is suitable for you to take laxatives and, if so, which ones. You might also find that you can ease constipation by increasing the amount of fibre in your diet. Drinking plenty of fluids and taking gentle exercise might also help. 

    Back to top


    FAQs about diet and lymphoma

    We answer some common questions people have about diet and lymphoma. Speak to your medical team for advice specific to your situation.

    Are there certain foods that could help cure lymphoma?

    From time to time, you might come across news stories about whether certain foods can prevent or cure cancer. Unfortunately, there is no evidence that food can cure cancer – be wary of claims that it can. 

    Cancer Research UK have information about alternative cancer diets, including Gerson therapy (coffee enemas) and macrobiotic diets (made up of vegetarian foods). They advise against following an alternative cancer diet. In addition to the lack of scientific evidence to say that any work, some could make you very unwell and lead to nutritional deficiencies.

    Should I take supplements?

    If you are able to eat a healthy balanced diet, the general guidance is that you do not need to take additional vitamin or mineral supplements. If you have difficulties eating, your doctor might advise you to take an additional general multivitamin and mineral supplement. It’s important to check with them before taking supplements. Some are harmful if taken in high doses and can react with other medications and treatment for lymphoma. 

    Are there foods I should avoid if my immune system is lowered?

    If your immune system is lowered, doctors may say you are ‘immunosuppressed’. This makes you more vulnerable to infection. If you have human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) or if you have a low number of white blood cells (neutropenia), you are immunosuppressed. Speak to your medical team for advice about any foods you should avoid to reduce your risk of infection.

    Will sugar make my lymphoma worse?

    Some people worry that sugar could ‘feed’ their lymphoma. There is no evidence that eating sugar makes lymphoma, or any type of cancer, grow. There are also no research findings to say that if you do not eat sugar, your lymphoma will go away. 

    Eating a lot of sugar brings other health risks, however, including obesity, which is linked to the development of other cancer types. A healthy diet means eating sugar in moderation. In general, sugary foods (such as cakes, biscuits and honey) provide little nutritional goodness and can lead to weight gain. If you are losing weight unintentionally, however, you may need to temporarily increase your intake of foods that are high in sugar and fat. Your doctor can advise you on this.

    Cancer Research UK has more information about sugar and cancer.

    Is it OK to eat a vegetarian or vegan diet?

    If you follow a vegetarian or vegan diet, you can still meet your nutritional requirements. Include a variety of carbohydrate foods, protein, fruit and vegetables in your diet. 

    Vegetarian sources of protein include dairy products, eggs and tofu. Vegan sources include pulses, nuts and soya products.

    Ensure, too, that you get enough iron. You can do this by eating pulses and dark green, leafy vegetables. If you eat a vegan diet, you should also consider taking a Vitamin B12 supplement to avoid developing a deficiency. 

    The Vegetarian Society and The Vegan Society give further guidance relevant to these diets.

    Should I eat organic foods?

    Organic food is produced with restricted use of man-made fertilisers and pesticides. In the UK, this is set by the Department for Agriculture and Rural Affairs (DEFRA). 

    Some people choose to eat an organic diet because they are concerned about traces of pesticides and herbicides left in food. These levels are closely monitored and reviewed with the aim of keeping them well below the level considered to be safe.

    Some research shows that organically grown crops contain higher levels of antioxidants. Antioxidants absorb free radicals, which can damage cells. However, there is not yet research to say whether eating more antioxidants in food reduces the risk of cancer. In addition, taking antioxidant supplements could have harmful effects.

    In summary, there is no good quality evidence to support that eating organic foods can prevent cancer or stop cancer recurring. For example:

    • In 2014, Cancer Research UK reported findings of their research looking into whether women who ate mostly or wholly organic foods were less likely to develop cancer than those who never ate organic foods. Among the 600,000 women who took part, they found no overall difference in risk between the two groups. An exception was in relation to non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). The researchers state that the risk of developing NHL is possibly lower in those who eat organic foods, but further investigation is needed.
    • A study carried out in France looked at 69,000 people. It found a lower risk of cancer in those who ate the most organic foods compared to those who ate the least. The largest effect was seen with lymphoma – particularly non-Hodgkin lymphoma. As the number of cases was very low, however, scientists are unable to draw conclusions. 

    Is it safe to eat grapefruit?

    You may have heard that it is unsafe to eat grapefruit while you are having treatment for lymphoma.

    Some foods affect how well drugs work. Before they can take effect, drugs first need to be broken down and absorbed into your bloodstream. Proteins called ‘enzymes’, particularly one known as ‘CYP3A’, are important in this process. Foods that block the action of these enzymes lower the amount of the drug that is absorbed into your body, making it less effective.

    Grapefruit can block CYP3A. You may, therefore, be advised to avoid eating grapefruit or drinking grapefruit juice while you are having treatment for lymphoma. Other fruits that may block CYP3A include Seville oranges, blackberries, pomegranates and some varieties of grape.

    Your consultant can advise you on whether to avoid particular foods and drinks based on your specific treatment.

    Is green tea helpful for people with lymphoma?

    Green tea is made from the leaves of Camellia sinensis, a plant that grows in China and India. Scientists think green tea could have the potential to prevent some cancers and to stop cancer cells from growing. However, far more research is needed. In addition, Cancer Research UK caution that there may be other risks associated with increased antioxidant consumption, for example, lowering the body’s ability to fight disease.

    A study of over 40,000 adults in Japan found a 42% lower rate of blood cancers (including non-Hodgkin lymphoma) in people who drank five or more cups of green tea each day compared to zero or one cup a day. Some scientists believe that the high level of antioxidants in green tea may account for this. However, limitations to this study mean that firm conclusions cannot be drawn. 

    A review carried out in 2016 looked at 51 studies with a total of over 1.6 million people. There was no conclusive evidence to make a link between drinking green tea and preventing cancer.

    Is it safe to drink green tea?

    There hasn’t been thorough testing to answer this question with certainty. However, in general, it’s thought that moderate consumption of green tea is safe for people with lymphoma. You should, however, check with your doctors whether it could affect your treatment – for example, researchers have reported that green tea could stop the drug bortezomib (Velcade®) working as well as it would do otherwise. Findings so far have come only from animal studies and more research is needed to tell whether this also applies to humans.

    Can Echinacea help me?

    Some people believe that the herb, Echinacea (purple coneflower) can boost immunity, fight cancer and improve side effects of chemotherapy and radiotherapy. At the moment, there is no evidence to support these ideas. If you would like to take Echinacea, speak to a member of your medical team about doing so first.

    Is it safe to eat chili peppers?

    Chili peppers contain capsaicin, which is what makes your mouth feel hot when you eat them. Although far more research is needed, early findings suggest that there may be a link with cancer. Capsaicin could possibly help to treat some cancers but may lead to other types of cancer. No links have yet been made with lymphoma.

    Can I eat out?

    You may feel anxious about eating out if you have difficulties eating. If your appetite is lowered, you could order a starter instead of a main course or order a child’s portion.

    If you have a low number of neutrophils (neutropenia), take extra care to follow food safety advice when eating out. You can check the food hygiene rating of pubs, clubs, take-aways and restaurants at the scores on the doors website.

    Is it safe to diet while I am having treatment for lymphoma?

    Generally, you should not try to lose weight during treatment because doing so can make it harder for your immune system to recover from treatment. 

    Steroids can stimulate your appetite, and cause fluid retention, leading to weight gain. Your weight should return to normal once you stop taking steroids.

    If you are thinking of dieting, speak to your doctor for advice on whether it is safe to do so.

    Back to top

    1. American Institute for Cancer Research. The spices of cancer prevention, 2013. Available at: aicr.org/cancer-research-update/august_21_2013/CRU_spices_cancer_prevention.html (Accessed April 2019).

    2. Bailey, DG. et al. Grapefruit–medication interactions: Forbidden fruit or avoidable consequences? 2013. Canadian Medical Association Journal, 185: 309–316. Available at: cmaj.ca/content/185/4/309.short (Accessed April 2019).

    3. Baudry, J. et al. Association of frequency of organic food consumption with cancer risk. Findings from the NutriNet-Santé prospective cohort study. Jama internal medicine, 2018. 178: 1597–1606. Available at: jamanetwork.com/journals/jamainternalmedicine/article-abstract/2707948 (Accessed April 2019).

    4. Bode, AM and Dong, Z. The two faces of capsaicin, 2011. Available at: cancerres.aacrjournals.org/content/71/8/2809 (Accessed April 2019).

    5. Boehm, K. et al. Green tea (Camellia sinensis) for the prevention of cancer, 2009. Cochrane database of systematic reviews. Available at: cochranelibrary.com/cdsr/doi/10.1002/14651858.CD005004.pub2/epdf/standard (Accessed April 2019).

    6. Cancer Research UK. Echinacea, 2019. Available at: www.cancerresearchuk.org/about-cancer/cancer-in-general/treatment/complementary-alternative-therapies/individual-therapies/echinacea (Accessed April 2019).

    7. Cancer Research UK. Green tea (Chinese tea), 2015. Available at: www.cancerresearchuk.org/about-cancer/cancer-in-general/treatment/complementary-alternative-therapies/individual-therapies/green-tea?_ga=2.105296772.625410314.1554212043-1106683717.1544532677 (Accessed April 2019).

    8. Cancer Research UK. Organic food doesn’t lower overall cancer risk, 2014. Available at: www.cancerresearchuk.org/about-us/cancer-news/press-release/2014-03-28-organic-food-doesnt-lower-overall-cancer-risk?_ga=2.118010766.625410314.1554212043-1106683717.1544532677 (Accessed April 2019).

    9. Can-Lan, S et al. Green tea, black tea and breast cancer risk: a meta-analysis of epidemiological studies. Available at: academic.oup.com/carcin/article/27/7/1310/2390988 (Accessed April 2019).

    10. Chacko, SM et al. Beneficial effects of green tea: A literature review, Chinese Medical Journal, 2010. 5: 13. Available at: ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2855614/ (Accessed April 2019).

    11. Clark, R and Seong-Ho, L. Anticancer properties of capsaicin against human cancer. Journal of pharmacology and experimental therapeutics, 2018. 364: 462–473. Available at: ar.iiarjournals.org/content/36/3/837.full (Accessed April 2019).

    12. Golden, EB et al. Green tea polyphenols block the anticancer effects of bortezomib and other boronic acid–based proteasome inhibitors. Blood, 2009. 113: 5927–5937. Available at: bloodjournal.org/content/113/23/5927?ijkey=330b31902dc2697aced1f49b3f795b68f6ab8e11&keytype2=tf_ipsecsha&sso-checked=true (Accessed April 2019).

    13. Gratus, C et al. The use of herbal medicines by people with cancer in the UK: a systematic review of the literature, 2009. 102: 831–842. Available at: academic.oup.com/qjmed/article/102/12/831/1563244#22740948 (Accessed April 2019).

    14. Lobo, V et al. Free radicals, antioxidants and functional foods: Impact on human health. Pharmacognosy Review, 2010: 118–126. Available at: ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3249911/ (Accessed April 2019).

    15. Mallhi TH, et al. Effect of Fruit/Vegetable-Drug Interactions on CYP450, OATP and p-Glycoprotein: A Systematic Review, 2015. 14: 1927–1935. Available at: bioline.org.br/pdf?pr15252 (Accessed April 2019).

    16. Miller, SC. Echinacea: a miracle herb against aging and cancer? Evidence in vivo in mice. Evidence-based complementary and alternative medicine, 2005. 2: 309–314. Available at: ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1193558/ (Accessed April 2019).

    17. Naganuma, T et al. Green tea consumption and Hematologic malignancies in Japan: The Ohsaki study. American Journal of epidemiology, 2009. 170: 730–738. Available at: academic.oup.com/aje/article/170/6/730/123581 (Accessed April 2019).

    18. National Cancer Institute. Antioxidants and cancer prevention, 2017. Available at: cancer.gov/about-cancer/causes-prevention/risk/diet/antioxidants-fact-sheet (Accessed April 2019).

    19. Newcastle University. Organic vs. non-organic food, 2015. Available at: ncl.ac.uk/press/articles/archive/2015/10/organicvsnon-organicfood/ (Accessed April 2019).

    20. NHS. Eating organic food linked with lower cancer risk, 2018. Available at: nhs.uk/news/cancer/eating-organic-food-linked-lower-cancer-risk/ (Accessed April 2019).

    21. Pilkington, K and the CAM Cancer Consortium. Echinacea spp, 2019. Available at: cam-cancer.org/en/echinacea-spp (Accessed April 2019).

    22. Rock, CL et al. Nutrition and physical activity guidelines for cancer survivors, 2012. CA: a cancer journal for clinicians. Available at: onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.3322/caac.21142 (Accessed April 2019).

    23. Winter, CK and Davis, SF. Organic foods. Journal of food science, 2006. 71: 1750–3841. Available at: onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/j.1750-3841.2006.00196.x (Accessed April 2019).

    Источник: https://lymphoma-action.org.uk/about-lymphoma-living-and-beyond-lymphoma/diet-and-nutrition

    Some fruits and vegetables can be very toxic to dogs, for example, onions and grapes. Others can make a perfect treat, so it’s important to know which are which. With that in mind, can dogs eat bananas? 

    The good news is, yes, they can! Bananas can be a healthy treat for adult dogs, but it pays to be a little more cautious when feeding bananas to puppies. 

    Introducing bananas to a dog’s diet

    Whenever a new food is introduced to a dog, it is always best to start slowly, giving the digestive system time to adjust. Dogs aren’t used to the large amounts of fibre in a banana and, in particular, the skin. While the skin isn’t dangerous to dogs, it is best to feed only peeled bananas to avoid sickness or diarrhoea.

    Some dogs will turn their noses up at a banana, but others will enjoy the sweet, fruity flavour. It just depends on the dog!

    How much banana can my dog eat?

    One banana benefit is that they don’t contain all the fat and salt that some manufactured treats do. If your dog likes bananas, they can be used as a tasty treat, however, it’s worth remembering that they are high in sugar, so if you're watching your dog’s waistline, limit banana treats to once in a while. 

    Bananas are a good source of magnesium, which can help with absorption of vitamins, promoting bone growth and protein production. They also contain potassium, vitamin C, vitamin B and fibre, but are no substitute for balanced and complete dog food.

    There is a feeding rule some vets and nutritionists like to follow. It’s called the 90/10 rule and should be implemented when feeding dogs extras, such as banana chunks. While 90% of a dog’s calories should come from quality dog food, the remaining 10% can be of treats!

    What about feeding bananas to puppies? 

    Heed caution when feeding bananas to puppies. They need a particular diet to help them grow correctly. Too much banana, or other treats, can upset the finely calculated balance of the feeding plan, so it might be best to avoid feeding bananas to puppies.

    Remember, when introducing puppies to a new food for the first time, they can get an upset stomach - any new foods must be introduced gradually.

    With a Kennel Club Pet Insurance policy, you can access the free Pet Health Helpline, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. The veterinary-trained team will advise on any concerns or queries that you may have over your pet’s health – much like the NHS 111 service for people. Call free on 03333 32 19 47.

    By Shelley Harrison

    Share thisFacebookTwitterИсточник: https://www.kcinsurance.co.uk/hub/2021/june/can-dogs-eat-bananas/

    What can I eat with gestational diabetes?

    Understanding your diet and eating healthily is an important part of your treatment for gestational diabetes. It will help you keep your blood sugar levels in the safe range so you’re more likely to enjoy a healthy pregnancy and give birth to a healthy baby.

    If you are diagnosed with gestational diabetes you should be referred to a dietitian for individual advice. If this has not happened ask your maternity care team to refer you. We have come up with some tips and recipes to support you too.

    To help you get started, we’ve got some options to try for breakfast, lunch, snacks and dinner. It’s important to be physically active every day as well, to help you manage your sugar levels.

    Some women with gestational diabetes can keep their sugar levels in the safe range by any necessary changes to their diet and keeping active. Some women may also need insulin and/or a diabetes medication called metformin.

    Eight tips for eating well with gestational diabetes

    These healthy eating tips for women with gestational diabetes are general. Your care team should talk to you about making changes to your diet and refer you to a dietitian for individual advice that’s right for you.

    1. Choose healthier carbohydrates (carbs)

    All carbs affect your blood sugar levels, so you need to know which foods contain carbs. 

    The type and amount of carbs you eat or drink makes a difference to your blood sugar levels. The amount makes the biggest difference. And your dietitian may talk to you about reducing your carb portion sizes. It’s important too, to choose healthier carbs.

    Easy swaps for healthier carbs

    • Swap white bread for multigrain, wholegrain, wholemeal, rye, linseed or pumpernickel.
    • Swap chapatti and roti made with white flour to those made with wholemeal flour. 
    • Swap white pittas for brown pittas.
    • Swap chips and mash for wholemeal pasta, baked plantain or sweet potato.
    • Swap white rice for brown rice.
    • Swap cereals like Cornflakes and Rice Krispies for Weetabix, Branflakes, Shredded Wheat (or supermarket brand ones) or porridge

    Other healthier carbs

    You can check food labels when you’re looking for foods high in fibre if you’re unsure.

    2. Cut down on sugar

    We know cutting down sugar can be really hard at the beginning, so small practical swaps are a good starting point.

    Easy ways to cut down on excess sugar: 

    • Swap sugary drinks, energy drinks and fruit juices with water, plain skimmed or semi-skimmed milk, or decaffeinated tea and coffee.
    • Try low or zero-calorie sweeteners, also known as artificial sweeteners, instead of using sugar. 
    • Have fewer foods like cakes, chocolates, ice cream and biscuits.
    • Know the other names for sugar on the food label. These are sucrose, glucose, dextrose, fructose, lactose, maltose, honey, invert sugar, syrup, corn sweetener and molasses. 

    3. Perfect your portion sizes

    Use our tips on carb portion sizes. This will help you manage your blood sugar levels and avoid too much weight gain during pregnancy. Talk to your care team about what weight gain is right for you. Your weight may be monitored closely while you’re pregnant. 

    4. Plan for snack attacks

    If you do need to snack when you have gestational diabetes, swap cake, biscuits, crisps and chocolate for: 

    • plain or low sugar yogurt 
    • unsalted nuts
    • seeds, fruit and veg 

    But watch your portion sizes still – it’ll help you keep an eye on your weight.

    5. Avoid diabetic foods

    The law has changed and manufacturers are no longer allowed to label food as diabetic or suitable for diabetics. They don’t have any special health benefits, they’re expensive, could still affect your blood sugar and may cause an upset stomach.

    6. Understand the glycaemic index

    The gylcaemic index (GI)  is a measure of how quickly foods containing carbs affect your blood sugar levels after you eat them. Some foods affect sugars levels quickly and so have a high GI, and others take longer to affect blood sugar levels and so have a low GI. To help you manage your blood sugar levels, go for carbs with a lower GI.  You’ll still need to think about your portion sizes. It’s the amount of carbs in the meal that will affect your blood sugar levels the most. And not all low GI foods are healthy, so make sure you read food labels and make a healthy choice.

    7. Manage your weight

    If you gain too much weight in pregnancy it can affect your health and increase your blood pressure. However, evidence suggests that pregnancy isn’t the time to be on a really strict diet and you shouldn’t aim to lose weight. But it’s important that your weight is monitored by your care team and you don’t gain too much weight, which could cause problems for you and your baby.

    Making changes to your diet and physical activity levels can help you avoid gaining too much weight. It’ll also help you to keep your blood sugar within a safe range.

    Breastfeeding is one of the ways you can help reduce your risk of developing type 2 diabetes after giving birth.

    It’s important to keep going with your healthier lifestyle after you’ve had your baby and keep to a healthy weight. This will reduce your risk of developing gestational diabetes in future pregnancies. And, it will also help to reduce your future risk of developing type 2 diabetes too. 

    8. Eat more fish

    Try to eat fish regularly, as it’s good for you and the development of your baby.

    The advice is to eat at least two portions a week, including at least one portion of oily fish – like mackerel, sardines, salmon, herrings, trout or pilchards. Oily fish is really good for heart health, but don’t have more than two portions a week because it contains low levels of pollutants (toxins). A portion is about 140g.

    Avoid fish which tend to have higher levels of mercury, like swordfish, shark and marlin. And, don’t have more than four medium-sized cans of tuna, or two tuna steaks a week, as it can have relatively high amounts of mercury compared to other fish.

    There are some foods you should avoid when you’re pregnant, including raw shellfish. The NHS have more information about what foods to avoid or take care with when you’re pregnant.

    Meal and snack ideas for gestational diabetes

    Try to include protein foods with each of your main meals, to help fill you up and help manage your sugar levels.

    Breakfast

    • A bowl of wholegrain cereal, such as porridge, with semi-skimmed milk
    • 2 slices of wholegrain toast with unsaturated low-fat spread
    • Low-fat and low-sugar yogurt and fruit.

    Or you could try making:

    Lunch

    • An egg, cheese, fish or chicken salad sandwich, made with wholegrain bread or chapatti/roti made with wholemeal flour
    • A small pasta salad, with plenty of veggies
    • Soup – containing lots of veggies and pulses – with a wholegrain roll. Some soup contains lots of added salt and sugar so check the label.
      Try our homemade chilli bean soup. .

    Or you could try making:

    Dinner

    Try serving dinners with our Cauliflower pilaf instead of rice.


    Get more recipe ideas – you can search by type of meal, ingredient and filters include vegetarian, vegan and gluten free. For each portion, you'll see how many calories, carbs and sugars there are.

    Источник: https://www.diabetes.org.uk/guide-to-diabetes/enjoy-food/eating-with-diabetes/i-have-gestational-diabetes

    Are Bananas Really Worth the Calories?

    5/5 experts say yes.

    Illustration by Lon Tweeten for TIME

    Last year, a zoo in the U.K. attracted international attention when it banned bananas from its primates’ cages. The reason? According to a zoo spokesperson, they’re too sugary for monkeys, too caloric, and they could give rise to health problems like type-2 diabetes.

    So should we humans eschew bananas, too? All five of our experts say no.

    Bananas are known for their high potassium content. A medium fruit has 422 mg potassium, 12% of the daily total recommended by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). “Most Americans do not get enough dietary potassium,” says Sylvia Wassertheil-Smoller, distinguished university professor emerita at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New York who researches such things. “Those who consume more potassium have a lower risk of stroke,” she says.

    A medium banana has 102 calories, 17% of recommended daily vitamin C and 3 grams of fiber. It also has 27 grams of carbohydrates (and 14 grams of sugar). “Many of my patients are fearful of this fruit due to its high carbohydrate content,” says Kristin Kirkpatrick, registered dietitian and manager of Wellness Nutrition Services at Cleveland Clinic’s Wellness Institute. Her advice: slice a banana in half and pair it with a fat, like peanut or almond butter, to lessen its effects on blood sugar and insulin.

    The coolest thing a banana can do, if you ask David Nieman, is to refuel your body as effectively as Gatorade for far less money (and food dye). In 2012, Nieman, professor of health science and director of the Appalachian State University Human Performance Laboratory at the North Carolina Research Campus, published a study in PLOSOne testing bananas against Gatorade in athletes. (The study was sponsored by Dole Foods; Nieman says he receives no compensation from the company. “All I care about is the scientific truth,” he says.)

    In the study, 14 male athletes cycled a 75-km road race, during which they refueled with either half a banana plus water, or a cup of Gatorade, about every 15 minutes. Three weeks later, the athletes repeated the experiment but switched what they ate during the race. Their performance times and body physiology were the same. But the researchers also discovered that the bananas contained serotonin and dopamine, which seemed to improve the body’s antioxidant capacity and help with oxidative stress.

    “The banana, we think, is like this wonderful athletic package where you get the sugars you need, you get the vitamins and electrolytes that the body likes during exercise, and this very unique molecule dopamine that can help with the oxidative stress, all at one third the cost of Gatorade,” Nieman says.

    It has other perks, too. “Bananas are one of the most versatile and important world foods,” says professor JamesDale from Australia’s Queensland University of Technology. It’s some of the hardiest, producing fruit year-round in good conditions and resilient for long periods when rains don’t come. To help combat vitamin A deficiencies in poor children around the world, Dale is part of a team, backed by millions from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, that’s genetically engineered a banana to deliver alpha- and beta-carotene, which turns into vitamin A in the body.

    Bananas’ popularity have a problem worth considering. There’s just one variety in the world that’s widely grown: the Cavendish, says DanKoeppel, author of Banana: The Fate of the Fruit That Changed the World. “The monoculture turns forests into factories, and means that bananas are very susceptible to disease, requiring lots of damaging pesticides to sustain the crop,” he says. “At the same time, bananas are the cheapest fruit in the supermarket. Maintaining these prices often means paying workers very little, which has led to violent suppression of attempts to expand worker benefits.”

    That makes bananas a problematic fruit, Koeppel says, but he still recommends eating them as a healthy alternative to candy and salty snacks. Ideally, customers should demand more varieties to break the monoculture, he says. But buying fair-trade bananas where some of the profits go to workers and the protection of the environment is a good place to start.

    With apologies to the banana-deprived primates at the zoo, the verdict for humans is clear.

    Read Next: Should I Eat Olives?

    More Must-Read Stories From TIME

    Write to Mandy Oaklander at [email protected]

    Источник: https://time.com/4017962/banana-nutrition/

    Going Bananas

     

    The expression "going bananas" is from the effects of bananas on the brain.  Read on:


    Never, put your banana in the refrigerator!

    They pump out loads of ethelene gas, which speeds the ripening of other fruits. This goes against the purpose of a fridge, which is to lengthen the shelf life of spoilable produce by about a week.

    Bananas will ripen at room temperature, away from heat or direct sun. Don't refrigerate under-ripe bananas because they'll never get any riper. Once they get to the right stage, however, you can put them in the refrigerator for up to two weeks. The outside will turn black, but the fruit is still quite edible. If you end up with a lot of overripe bananas and can't bear to make another loaf of banana bread, cut them into chunks, wrap them in plastic wrap and put them in the freezer. When you want a sweet treat this summer, just pop one in your mouth.

    Bananas contain three natural sugars - sucrose, fructose and glucose combined with fiber. A banana gives an instant, sustained and substantial boost of energy.

    Research has proven that just two bananas provide enough energy for a strenuous 90-minute workout. No wonder the banana is the number one fruit with the world's leading athletes.

    But energy isn't the only way a banana can help us keep fit. It can also help overcome or prevent a substantial number of illnesses and conditions, making it a must to add to our daily diet..


    Depression:

    According to a recent survey undertaken by MIND amongst people suffering from depression, many felt much better after eating a banana. This is because bananas contain tryptophan, a type of protein that the body converts into serotonin, known to make you relax, improve your mood and generally make you feel happier.

    PMS:

    Forget the pills - eat a banana. The vitamin B6 it contains regulates blood glucose levels, which can affect your mood.

    Anemia:

    High in iron, bananas can stimulate the production of hemoglobin in the blood and so helps in cases of anemia.

    Blood Pressure:

    This unique tropical fruit is extremely high in potassium yet low in salt, making it perfect to beat blood pressure. So much so, the US Food and Drug Administration has just allowed the banana industry to make official claims for the fruit's ability to reduce the risk of blood pressure and stroke.

    Brain Power:

    200 students at a Twickenham (Middlesex) school ( England ) were helped through their exams this year by eating bananas at breakfast, break, and lunch in a bid to boost their brain power. Research has shown that the potassium-packed fruit can assist learning by making pupils more alert.

    Constipation:

    High in fiber, including bananas in the diet can help restore normal bowel action, helping to overcome the problem without resorting to laxatives.  

    Gardening:

    If you have  roses in your garden, drape the used banana skin around the base of the tree and your roses will bloom in abundance.  Also very good fertiliser for any garden plants and it easily rots down without having to compost it first.

    Hangovers:

    One of the quickest ways of curing a hangover is to make a banana milkshake, sweetened with honey. The banana calms the stomach and, with the help of the honey, builds up depleted blood sugar levels, while the milk soothes and re-hydrates your system.

    Heartburn:

    Bananas have a natural antacid effect in the body, so if you suffer from heartburn, try eating a banana for soothing relief.

    Morning Sickness:

    Snacking on bananas between meals helps to keep blood sugar levels up and avoid morning sickness.

    Mosquito Bites:

    Before reaching for the insect bite cream, try rubbing the affected area with the inside of a banana skin. Many people find it amazingly successful at reducing swelling and irritation.

    Nerves:

    Bananas are high in B vitamins that help calm the nervous system.

    Overweight:

    And at work? Studies at the Institute of Psychology in Austria found pressure at work leads to gorging on comfort food like chocolate and chips. Looking at 5,000 hospital patients, researchers found the most obese were more likely to be in high-pressure jobs. The report concluded that, to avoid panic-induced food cravings, we need to control our blood sugar levels by snacking on high carbohydrate foods every two hours to keep levels steady.

    Ulcers:

    The banana is used as the dietary food against intestinal disorders because of its soft texture and smoothness. It is the only raw fruit that can be eaten without distress in over-chronicler cases. It also neutralizes over-acidity and reduces irritation by coating the lining of the stomach.

    Temperature control:

    Many other cultures see bananas as a "cooling" fruit that can lower both the physical and emotional temperature of expectant mothers.. In Thailand , for example, pregnant women eat bananas to ensure their baby is born with a cool temperature.


    Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD):

    Bananas can help SAD sufferers because they contain the natural mood enhancer tryptophan.

    Smoking &Tobacco Use:

    Bananas can also help people trying to give up smoking. The B6, B12 they contain, as well as the potassium and magnesium found in them, help the body recover from the effects of nicotine withdrawal.  Unless accommpanied by extra exercise they will also help to pile the weight on - always a catch!

    Stress:

    Potassium is a vital mineral, which helps normalize the heartbeat, sends oxygen to the brain and regulates your body's water balance.. When we are stressed, our metabolic rate rises, thereby reducing our potassium levels. These can be re balanced with the help of a high-potassium banana snack.

    Strokes:

    According to research in The New England Journal of Medicine, eating bananas as part of a regular diet can cut the risk of death by strokes by as much as 40%.

    Warts:

    Those keen on natural alternatives swear that if you want to kill off a wart, take a piece of banana skin and place it on the wart, with the yellow side out. Carefully hold the skin in place with a plaster or surgical tape!  Keep it there until the wart has gone.


    So, a banana really is a natural remedy for many ills. When you compare it to an apple, it has four times the protein, twice the carbohydrate, three times the phosphorus, five times the vitamin A and iron, and twice the other vitamins and minerals. It is also rich in potassium and is one of the best value foods around So maybe its time to change that well-known phrase so that we say, "A banana a day keeps the doctor away!"

    PASS IT ON TO YOUR FRIENDS
    PS: Bananas must be the reason monkeys are so happy all the time!

    Shoe Shine; want a quick shine on our shoes?? Take the INSIDE of the banana skin, and rub directly on the shoe...polish with dry cloth. Amazing fruit !!!

     

    Word of caution.  Bananas have a quick energy release - that's why they're popular with sports people.  You should not eat too many bananas if you are sedentary.  Bananas readily soak into their skin and flesh agricultural poisins associated with weed killer, fertiliser and environmental so these days organic is best.

      

    Источник: https://www.mindandbodybury.co.uk/page_1959199.html
    are bananas good for you uk

    Posted by: | on October 2, 2012
    Posted in For you | 4 Comments »


    4 Comments to Are bananas good for you uk

    1. What is procedure during death of Account person and scheme will remain continue or widrawal money

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

    © 2022: journey to the west conquering the demons 2013 subtitle indonesia | KABBO Theme by: D5 Creation | Powered by: WordPress