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    Lucille bremer abelardo louis rodriguez


    lucille bremer abelardo louis rodriguez

    Miami-Dade Housing Agency. Waiting List 2008. September 2008. Last Name. First Name. Confirmation Number. Client ID PH Ranking S8 Ranking. ALBERTINI. LUIS. https://www.artsy.net/artwork/sebastiaan-bremer-rhododendron-hybridum-prinses-marijke https://www.artsy.net/artwork/luis-rodriguez-noa-citi-zen. While filming "The Adventures of Casanova" in Mexico City, she met Abelardo Rodriguez, the son of a former President of Mexico. When they were.
    lucille bremer abelardo louis rodriguez

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    Will You Marry Me? - Yolanda and the Thief '45 - Fred Astaire \u0026 Lucille Bremer /HD

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    Lucille bremer abelardo louis rodriguez
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    Lucille Bremer

    Lucille Bremer This Day in WWII 5 March 1940 1945 Ready Room

    Lucille Bremer was born in Amsterdam, New York, but soon moved to Philadelphia Pennsylvania, where she studied ballet. At age 12, she danced with the Philadelphia Opera Company.

    Lucille Bremer httpsuploadwikimediaorgwikipediacommons55

    Once in New York, she danced in various specialty acts, most notably in the 1939 New York World's Fair "American Jubilee". She auditioned and began her career as a Rockette at Radio City Music Hall in New York City, at age 16. She was voted as "most likely to succeed" by her Rockette peers. She was also known as "5th from the right" in the Rockettes line up. Bremer also auditioned as a dancer for various Broadway shows, along with fellow stars Vera-Ellen and June Allyson, appearing as a 'Pony Girl' in the Broadway musical Panama Hattie

    Lucille Bremer Lucille Bremer Wikipedia

    Bremer's pokemon card store attempt for a career in films was unsuccessful. Her screen test with Warner Bros. was unsuccessful; "It was so bad I realized why nothing had happened," she said later. She returned to dancing, performing at the Copacabana nightclub in New York City and the Club Versailles, where she was spotted by Arthur Freed, a producer at Metro Goldwyn Mayer.

    Lucille Bremer Lucille Bremer Vintage 3 inactive Pinterest Classic

    She was taken to Hollywood, where her screen test impressed Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer mogul Louis B. Mayer. An accomplished dancer, she was considered to display potential as a dramatic actress. She also screen tested and was offered a contract with Goldwyn Studios, but decided on MGM studios to properly showcase her dancing talent. She studied acting at MGM with the great acting coach Lillian Burns, and was groomed for stardom as an important member of the legendary Freed Unit.

    Bremer made her screen debut to excellent notices in director Vincente Minnelli's smash hit Technicolor lucille bremer abelardo louis rodriguez Meet Me in St. Louis (1944) as Rose Smith, Judy Garland's older sister, and followed this with a starring role opposite Fred Astaire in the musical fable Yolanda and the Thief (1945). Despite sumptuous production values and a staff of high-priced talent behind the scenes (directed again by Vincente Minnelli from a story by Ludwig Bemelmans, with an original score by Harry Warren and producer/songwriter Arthur Freed, and choreographed by Eugene Loring), it was a box-office failure. The film's ambitious surrealist fantasy theme was not popular with wartime audiences, and unfortunately Bremer, a newcomer in her first starring role, took most of the blame. Her career never recovered. She followed this disappointment with featured dance performances, once again with Astaire and directed by Minnelli, in two memorable sequences in the successful musical revue Ziegfeld Follies (released in 1946, but Bremer's numbers were actually filmed in 1945, prior to filming Yolanda and the Thief). Her last major film musical was the lavish Jerome Kern biopic Till the Clouds Roll By (1946), in which Bremer has some good dramatic scenes and dances with Van Johnson. But after this, MGM began to lose interest in promoting her. After a minor dramatic film at MGM, Dark Delusion (1947), she was loaned out to Eagle-Lion in 1948 for her final three films. Bremer played her last starring role in the film noir Behind Locked Doors (1948).

    Reportedly disappointed with her Hollywood career, she elected not to renew her contract and left the film industry. She had also met and fallen in love with the son of the former president of Mexico, Abelardo Luis Rodriguez, who bore the same name as his father. She and Rod Rodriguez were married at Catalina Island in August 1948. She moved with him to Baja California Sur, Mexico, at the beginning of the Golden Age of Baja and started the private resort Rancho Las Cruces, as well as the original Palmilla Hotel and the Hacienda Hotel. With her contacts in Hollywood, and her husband "Rod" Rodriguez's influence, they drew people from Hollywood who sought to enjoy this newly found paradise. She and her husband were also business partners with Desi Arnaz, Lucille Ball, and Bing Crosby to name a few.

    Lucille Bremer Pin by Christine Nagy on Lucille Bremer Tana Pinterest

    After her divorce (in 1963), Bremer settled in La Jolla, California, where she owned a children's clothing boutique. She continued to travel between La Jolla, California, and Baja California Mexico. She died in 1996 from a heart attack at age 79. Her ashes were scattered in the Sea of Cortez as well as scattered next to the church she and her husband had built on the Rancho Las Cruces resort property. A plaque bearing her name, as well as that of Desi Arnaz, was erected on the left side of the church in her honor. She left four children: Nicholas, Torre, Cristina, and Karen.

    Источник: https://alchetron.com/Lucille-Bremer

    Lucille Bremer

    Lucille Bremer (February 21, 1917 – April 16, 1996) was an American film actress and dancer.

    Biography

    Lucille Bremer was born in Amsterdam, New York, but soon moved to Philadelphia Pennsylvania, where she studied ballet. At age 12, she danced with the Philadelphia Opera Company.[1]

    Once in New York, she danced in various specialty acts, most notably in the 1939/40 New York's World's Fair "American Jubilee". She auditioned and began her career as a Rockette at Radio City Music Hall in New York City, at age 16.[1] She was voted as "most likely to succeed" by her Rockette peers.[2] She was also known as "5th from the right" in the Rockettes line up. Bremer also auditioned as a dancer for various Broadway shows, along with fellow stars Vera-Ellen and June Allyson, appearing as a 'Pony Girl' in the Broadway musical Panama Hattie

    Bremer's first attempt for a career in films was unsuccessful Her screen test with Warner Bros. was unsuccessful; "It was so bad I realized why nothing had happened," she said later.[2] She returned to dancing, performing at the Copacabana Nightclub in New York City and the Club Versailles, where she was spotted by Arthur Freed, a producer at Metro Goldwyn Mayer.[2]

    She was taken to Hollywood, where her screen test impressed Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer mogul Louis B. Mayer. An accomplished dancer, she was also considered to display potential as a dramatic actress. She also screen tested and was offered a contract with Goldwyn Studios, but decided on MGM studios to properly showcase her dancing talent. She studied acting at MGM with the great acting coach Lillian Burns.

    Bremer made her screen debut in Meet Me in St. Louis (1944) as Judy Garland's sister, and followed this with a co-starring role opposite Fred Astaire in Yolanda and the Thief (1945), and a featured dance performance, once again with Astaire, in two memorable sequences in Ziegfeld Follies (1946). Her last major film was Till the Clouds Roll By (1946), but after this, MGM began to lose interest in promoting her. After a few minor films, she played her last starring role in Behind Locked Doors (1948).

    Reportedly disappointed with her Hollywood career, she elected not to renew her contract and left the film industry. She had also met and fallen in love with the son of the former president of Mexico, Abelardo Luis Rodriguez,[3] who bore the same name as his father. She and Rod Rodriguez were married at Catalina Island in August 1948. She moved with him to Baja California Sur, Mexico, at the beginning of the Golden Age of Baja and started the private resort Rancho Las Cruces, as well as the original Palmilla Hotel and the Hacienda Hotel. With her contacts in Hollywood, and her husband "Rod" Rodriguez's influence, they drew people from Hollywood who sought to enjoy this newly found paradise. She and her husband were also business partners with Desi Arnaz, Lucille Ball, and Bing Crosby to name a few.

    After her divorce (in 1963), Bremer settled in La Jolla, California, where she owned a children's clothing boutique. She continued to travel between La Jolla, California, and Baja California Mexico. She died in 1996 from a heart attack at age 79. Her ashes were scattered in the Sea of Cortez as well as scattered next to the church she and her husband had built on the Rancho Las Cruces resort property. A plaque bearing her name, as well as that of Desi Arnaz, was erected on the left side of the church in her honor.

    She left four children (Nicholas, Torre, Cristina, and Karen) and numerous grandchildren (Francesca, Amanda, Andres, Alexis, Kamal, and David) and great-grandchildren. Her son, Niki (Nicolas) continues to manage and run the Rancho Las Cruces resort where they recently celebrated their 65th anniversary of the resort in May 2015. Her other children, Cristina, Kali (Karen) and Torre continue to live in the Baja California Mexico area where they also manage their own properties as well. Her children and grandchildren continue to spend their time between La Jolla, California, and Baja California Mexico. Rod Rodriguez is still alive today at age 98 and resides in the La Jolla, California area.

    Filmography

    References

    External links

    This article is issued from Wikipedia - version of the 11/21/2016. The text is available under the Creative Commons Attribution/Share Alike but additional terms may apply for the media files.

    Источник: http://yamm.finance/wiki/Lucille_Bremer.html

    Over 9,000 years ago, members of the Gabrielino/Tongva tribe built settlements on a rocky island located 25 miles off the coast of what is today Southern California. They referred to their homeland as Pimu or Pimugna and themselves as Pimungans. In the 1500s, Spanish explorer Juan Rodriguez Cabrillo landed on the island and claimed it for Spain, naming it San Salvador (after his ship). In the early 1600s, another Spanish explorer, Sebastian Vizcaino, renamed the island Santa Catalina Island (in honor of St. Catherine). That name stuck.

    Although the island fell under Spanish rule, American and Russian hunters set up camps on the island to hunt for seals and sea lions. Missionaries visited the island to teach the gospel. Miners lucille bremer abelardo louis rodriguez for gold and precious minerals. Pirates of all nationalities used the islands to conduct smuggling activities. In 1846, mere days before the United States invaded Mexico, the Governor of Mexico granted ownership of Santa Catalina Island to Thomas Robbins, a naturalized citizen of Mexico. A few years later, Santa Catalina Island became part of the United States. Robbins sold the land in 1850 to Jose Maria Covarrubias. The island changed hands a number of times during the next several years with James Lick (at one point the richest man in California) purchasing the entire island in 1864.

    Real estate developer George Shatto bought the island from the Lick family (James Lick had died) in 1887 with the idea of turning it into a resort. He defaulted on the loan and the property returned to Lick’s estate. Brothers Joseph and Hancock Banning (sons of Phineas Banning, “father of the Port of Los Angeles”) bought the island and did develop resort facilities, only to have them destroyed in a fire that eventually bankrupted them. In 1919, chewing gum magnate William Wrigley bought the island. He made many infrastructure improvements, built attractions (including the Catalina Casino), and made the island a destination for tourists and fun seekers. When William Wrigley died, the oversight of the island passed to his son, Phillip, who, in 1975, deeded 90% of the island to the newly formed Catalina Island Conservancy (which Phillip had created).

    Today, Santa Catalina Island – generally referred to as Catalina Island or simply Catalina – is visited by over a million tourists per year. A perusal of the Los Angeles Public Library’s photo collection (TESSA) shows Catalina Island to be an archeological treasure trove, a seaside resort, a fisherman’s paradise, and a Southern California version of home on the range where the buffalo do indeed roam.

    The Pimugnans mined the island’s vast reserves of soapstone, often traveling to the coastland (to what is today San Pedro) to sell this commodity. They had villages all over the island. In this photo, an anthropologist is seen with human remains he has unearthed from a Native American grave on Santa Catalina Island.

    anthropologist on catalina

    Security Pacific National Bank Collection, photo taken in 1920.

    The anthropologist (name unknown) displays a fire-making tool used by Native Americans who inhabited Catalina Island.

    catalina island relics

    Security Pacific National Bank Collection, photo taken in 1920.

    Pictured here is a panoramic view of Avalon Bay. The large ship in the harbor is the S.S. Catalina, also known as the Great White Steamer, which ferried passengers between Los Angeles and Avalon Harbor for over fifty years. If you click on the photo, you will be able to see a large circular building on the far right. This is the Catalina Casino, which houses a theater and ballroom (but no gambling facilities).

    avalon bay

    Security Pacific National Bank Collection, photo taken by Dick Whittington, date unknown.

    The Catalina Casino (also known as the Avalon Casino Ballroom) was built in the Moorish Alhambra style and adorned with Art Deco fixtures. The Casino’s ballroom, as seen here, is the largest circular ballroom in the world and has a row of permanent seats surrounding it.

    catalina ballroom

    Herman Schultheis Collection, photo taken by Herman Schultheis in 1938.

    The interior of the Catalina Casino features Art Deco styling. The building itself is surrounded by the sea on three sides. Here we see the Casino’s lobby and box office. (The Casino does not have any gambling facilities but does show movies and hold special events.)

    catalina casino lobby

    Security Pacific National Bank Collection, photo taken in 1929.

    With its temperate weather, Catalina Island is a great spot for outdoor events. Here we see an open-air theater on a hillside on the island. The theater was apparently used for concerts, as a sign on the lucille bremer abelardo louis rodriguez shell stated: “Do not talk while band is playing.”

    open-air theater on catalina island

    Security Pacific National Bank Collection, photo undated.

    Folks are also able to enjoy dining al fresco pretty much all year round on Catalina Island. Here we see tables set up outside the Paseo El Encanto, a market in Avalon that featured Spanish Colonial Revival architecture.

    paseo el encanto catalina island

    Herman Schultheis Collection, photo taken by Herman Schultheis in 1938.

    Catalina Island is known for its great fishing spots. The crew of the fishing boat Diamond Jim chose the west end of the island to cast their nets and got an unexpected catch – a 4,200 pound great white shark!

    shark caught catalina island

    Herald Examiner Collection, photo taken by Michael Haering on September 20, 1985.

    Zane Grey, author of many popular western adventure novels (the most famous being Riders of the Purple Sage), built a home on Catalina Island (which later became the Zane Grey Pueblo Hotel) to use as a place to get away, write, and fish. (His primary California residence was in Altadena.)  Grey served lucille bremer abelardo louis rodriguez president of Catalina’s exclusive fishing club, the Tuna Club of Avalon. Here he poses with a swordfish he caught off the shores of Catalina Island.

    zane grey with swordfish

    Security Pacific National Bank Collection, photo undated.

    Of course, with all the fish available off the shores of Santa Catalina Island (tuna, mackerel, sardines), fishing was not only a recreational endeavor but also a commercial enterprise.  Pictured here are employees of Coast Fishing Tuna Cannery in Avalon.

    cannery workers catalina island

    Shades of L.A. Collection, photo taken in 1945.

    Taxidermy of large fish was also popular. In this photo, a woman prepares a fish for mounting at a taxidermist shop in Avalon.

    swordfish mounting

    Security Pacific National Bank Collection, photo taken in 1933.

    Many residents built beautiful homes on the island.  The Banning brothers, who had ownership of Santa Catalina Island for over 25 years, sought to make Avalon (the only incorporated city on the island) a world-class resort. They built the Hotel St. Catherine and added attractions that included an incline railway, an amphitheater, and an aquarium. A huge fire swept through the city in 1915 and destroyed most of their property. This photo is of Descanso, the Catalina Island home of Hancock Banning.

    banning residence on catalina

    Security Pacific National Bank Collection, photo taken by Park & Co. Photo Studio, date unknown.

    William Wrigley, Jr. (of Wrigley chewing gum fame) bought Catalina Island from the Banning brothers in 1919. He upgraded the island by installing utilities, building roads, planting trees and other flora, and building the Catalina Casino. He also oversaw the construction of his own personal residence which sat on a hill overlooking Avalon.

    wrigley residence catalina island

    Security Pacific National Bank Collection, photo undated.

    The stately Victorian home known as the Routing number transit number Residence had a castle-like presence in the midst of tropical landscaping.

    lefmann residence

    Security Pacific National Bank Collection, photo undated.

    While Avalon is the most populous city on Catalina Island, the town of Two Harbors — located at the Isthmus of Santa Catalina (18 miles from Avalon) and built between two harbors (Banning Harbor and Catalina Harbor) — offers beautiful views and a great place to unwind, as seen in this photo.

    two harbors on catalina harbor

    Security Pacific National Bank Collection, photo undated.

    Of course, not all residents of Catalina Island are human. Buffalo were brought over to the island for the filming of a movie and remained on the island after the film shoot ended. (Note: Popular consensus is that the film which introduced buffalo to the island was the 1925 silent film The Vanishing American. That film, however, has no bison in it. Some theorized that the film The Covered Wagon brought the creatures to Catalina, yet that movie (which does feature buffalo) was not filmed on the island. Another film, The Thundering Herd (released in 1925) may have brought buffalo to Catalina Island, as the Catalina Islander (the island’s newspaper) mentioned in its October 6th, 1938, edition that the herd had been brought over by the filmmakers who then gifted the herd to the island.)

    buffalo on catalina island

    Valley Times Collection, photo dated July 22, 1962.

    Spanish missionaries brought a few goats to Catalina Island in 1827, ostensibly as food for natives living on the island. The missionaries and the natives eventually all left the island, but the goats stayed and multiplied. (The goat population on Catalina Island in the 1950s was approximately 25,000.) The goats lived on the rugged terrain at the west end of the island, surviving on any and all vegetation — grass, cacti, flowers, tree leaves and bark. In the early 1990s, efforts were made to eliminate the goat population as they were decimating the top soil and negatively affecting Catalina’s ecosystem. Today, there are no goats (other than a few pets) on the island.

    mountain goats on catalina

    Security Pacific National Bank Collection, photo undated.

    Not all the goats on Catalina were wild. Some were downright friendly and loved company — particularly if said company brought them something to eat. And since goats eat just about anything, it is not hard to find a snack to entice them!

    goats eating hats

    Security Pacific National Bank Collection, photo taken in 1928.

    The Santa Catalina Bird Park covered eight acres, housed over 8,000 different species of birds, and was Catalina’s biggest attraction for over 35 years. Known as the world’s largest birdcage, it was constructed from remnants of the Sugarloaf Dance Pavilion which had been demolished to create space for the Catalina Casino. The bird park closed in 1966 and all birds were transferred to the Los Angeles Zoo.

    santa catalina bird park

    Works Progress Administration Collection, photo taken by Alma Overholt on March 18, 1940.

    For the Chicago Cubs, beautiful Catalina Island was not a vacation destination but rather a place of grueling exercise and intense work. William Wrigley owned the baseball team and had them come to the island for their Spring training.

    chicago cubs on catalina island

    Security Pacific National Bank Collection, photo taken in 1930.

    Abelardo Luis Rodriguez (man on the right), son of General Rodriguez (former President of Mexico), chose Catalina Island as a place to marry and have a honeymoon. After arriving at Catalina Island’s airport with his wedding party, he and his companions were taken to Toyon Bay where he and his fiancée, actress Lucille Bremer (female in middle of photo), were married by a Justice of the Peace. Toyon Bay is two and a half miles northwest of Avalon and was once the site of a boy’s boarding school. During World War II, the school site was used to house the Office of Strategic Services (which would later become the Central Intelligence Agency) where soldiers were trained in guerrilla warfare. The site is now occupied by Catalina Island Marine Institute which offers educational programs and summer camps for children.

    Abelardo Luis Rodriguez

    Valley Times Collection, photo dated August 6, 1948.

    As the number of vehicles allowed on the island is restricted (and obtaining a permit to import a car or truck can take more than ten years), most lucille bremer abelardo louis rodriguez – particularly those staying in Avalon – walk, bike, or use golf carts to get around. Natural beauty and no traffic — now that is paradise!

    golf carts on catalina island

    Shades of L.A. Collection, Shades of L.A.: Mexican American Community, photo taken in 1962.

     

     

    Categories Local HistoryTags anthropologists on catalina island, avalon bay, aviaries, banning harbor, banning residence, canneries, catalina, catalina birdcage, catalina bison, catalina casino, catalina harbor, catalina island, catalina island buffalo, catalina island goats, city of avalon, descanso residence, great white sharks, paseo el encante, pimu tribe, pimugnans, santa catalina bird park, santa catalina island, southern california channel islands, swordfish fishing, toyon bay, tuna cannery, tuna fishing, two harbors, wrigley residence, zane greyИсточник: http://photofriends.org/page/3/

    Director: Oscar Boetticher
    Writers: Malvin Wald and Eugene Ling, based on a story by Malvin Wald
    Stars: Lucille Bremer and Richard Carlson

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    Index: 2017 Centennials.

    You couldn’t tell it from this film, but Lucille Bremer was a dancer, a Rockette at Radio City Music Hall at the age of sixteen and the one ‘most likely to succeed’, according to her peers. It can’t surprise that she attempted a film career, but she failed her screen test at Warner Bros. and knew it, once she insisted on going back to view it. She went back to dancing, at clubs like the Copacabana and the Club Versailles in New York and, only later, got her second shot at Hollywood, after Arthur Freed saw her dancing and had her audition for Louis B. Mayer. This time it went well and a brief career in MGM musicals ensued. A supporting role as Judy Garland’s sister in Meet Me in St. Louisled to the lead in Vincente Minnelli’s Yolanda and the Thief, opposite a star of the calibre of Fred Astaire. Unfortunately, the picture failed for many reasons and she never got another musical lead. She danced with Astaire once more in Ziegfeld Folliesand also appeared in Till the Clouds Roll By, the biopic of Jerome Kern. Her musical career had lasted three years.

    Mayer considered that she also had potential for dramatic roles but she was never pushed for them. Her last MGM picture was in support of Lionel Barrymore and James Craig in the final Dr. Gillespie movie, Dark Delusion; then they loaned her out to a poverty row company, Eagle-Lion Films. Her final three films were shot for them in 1948: Adventures of Casanova, Ruthlessand this picture, which is short and sweet but deserves more attention than it tends to receive. It runs a mere 61 minutes, but packs rather a lot in; had it been made as an A-movie rather than a B-movie, it could easily have filled a further half hour with character development. It isn’t too surprising that, eventually, someone came back to the ideas here and made another feature along similar lines, though Sam Fuller’s Shock Corridor, made fifteen years later in 1963, attempts a lot more and succeeds at it too. If we compare the two, the later film wins every time, but that doesn’t mean that this one doesn’t achieve the goals that it’s set.

    We know it’s a film noir immediately, because director Budd Boetticher has one lady walk out of the shadows, followed by another who has been tailing her. This was early enough in his career that he was still being credited as Oscar Boetticher, though the Jr. he started out with had been dropped a couple of years prior. Boetticher, of course, became known for his westerns, but that’s one of the few genres that Behind Locked Doorsisn’t; it’s a drama, a romance and a thriller, all shot in a film noir style by cinematographer Guy Roe. It’s the second of those ladies who’s played by Lucille Bremer; she’s Kathy Lawrence, a reporter for the Tribune, and she’s tailing Madge Bennett because she’s convinced she’ll lead her to Judge Finlay Drake. Us bank internet banking enrollment, ex-judge Finlay Drake, that is, who’s on the lam with $10,000 offered for any information leading to his arrest. We’re never told what he did to deserve such attention, but every cop in the state is looking for him and Lawrence thinks she’s found him.

    We know it’s a B-movie because the running time doesn’t include much for introductions, so we’re treated to a succession of signs to tell us where we are and, often, who we’re about to meet. First up for Lawrence is a private investigator called Ross Stewart. We aren’t privy to why she picked him, but his throwaway comment about her being his first client may not lucille bremer abelardo louis rodriguez a joke; the letterer has just finished painting his name on his door when she arrives to see him. Everything adds up, she tells Stewart. She followed Madge to the La Siesta sanitarium; she’s the judge’s girlfriend who’s supposed prairie state bank mortgage rates be out of town. The place is run by Dr. Clifford Porter, a former state medical officer and friend of Drake’s. Even her gut tells her that it’s true and I’ve seen enough journalist movies from the thirties and forties to know that we should always trust the reporter’s gut. The only catch is that she can’t prove anything. She has to get someone inside to confirm with his own eyes that the judge is there. Hence Ross Stewart, P.I.
    This is an interesting set-up lucille bremer abelardo louis rodriguez it’s put together well, even if the lack of budget is clearly on show. Bremer is a confident actress, a surprising thing for someone whose contract was up after this picture and knew she wouldn’t renew it. She reminds of Bette Davis from the side, something not lost on MGM who had her read from Dark Victoryduring her audition because they saw that too; from the front, she’s more like Myrna Loy, except that she moves more than her facial muscles. Had I not known she was a dancer, I bet I’d never have guessed it from this picture; even though I did know she was a dancer, I’m more than happy with her non-dancing work and would happily have kept watching her next bunch of dramatic pictures. As Ross Stewart, however, Richard Carlson does try too hard, especially early on when the P.I. is trying to impress his client, and he ends up making her look even better than she does on her own. Fortunately he gets better as the film runs on, especially as he’s really the lead, even if she got top billing.

    The complexities of Shock Corridoraren’t apparent here, but there’s still plenty going on in La Siesta when Stewart, masquerading as Kathy’s manic depressive husband, Harry Horton, gets himself committed on the recommendation of the state psychiatrist. The downside is that almost everyone inside is a one-dimensional character, there for a single purpose. The upside is that they’re each played well and, in three instances, by uncredited actors who film fans will recognise. There’s Kathleen Freeman, maybe still best known as the Penguin in The Blues Brothers, here playing a nurse. There’s prolific child actor Dickie Moore who, at the ripe old age of 22, was closing in on the end of a long screen career; he’d started at a mere eighteen months and stayed busy throughout. And, most prominent of the three, is Tor Johnson, in a non-speaking but still substantial role as the Champ, locked in a sparse cell at La Siesta with only a chair for company and tormented by an attendant, who fakes bell sounds to make him jump up and fight.
    Die hards will know many more, of course, including the man who impressed me most in this film, the only one with a part crafted out of more than cardboard. He’s Ralf Harolde, playing very much against type as a man named Fred Hopps. We’re never told what Hopps is, but I’m presuming that he’s the one human employee on the La Siesta staff rather than a patient put to more trusting use than his peers. This is a long way from the gangsters I’m used to seeing him play, especially in the thirties, and he impresses. He’s very proper here, somewhat like a shrunken version of Boris Karloff outside his horror roles, especially with his close cropped hair and bow tie. That helps him stand out as the ‘good’ on the staff, as compared to the ‘bad’ of his boss, Dr. Porter, and the ‘ugly’ of his most obvious colleague, Larson, the psychopathic senior attendant, whose round glasses lend him a Gestapo feel that seems highly appropriate given his sadism. Prolific character actor Douglas Fowley isn’t stretched as Larson but does his job well anyway.

    If the actors are reliable and the crew back them up with decent if routine editing, score and cinematography, it’s really the script that stands out for most attention. The story is by Malvin Wald, who adapted it with Eugene Ling. This was early in his career but it came right after The Naked City, for which he had served in the same roles, adapting his own story there with Albert Maltz. He does a textbook job here of setting things up well and wrapping them up well too. Every character is in the movie for a good reason and everything happens for a good reason as well. Even as we close in on the finalé and wonder which of a few options he’s going to go with, we aren’t surprised at all by how it plays out. Again, with an extra half hour, I’m sure he could have added complexity to the characters and allowed them to develop, but he doesn’t have that luxury and, frankly, I’m impressed by how much he crammed in with a mere hour to play with. The catch is that I can’t say too much or I’ll venture rapidly into spoiler territory!
    As befits the top billed name, Lucille Bremer does do more than just send Stewart into harm’s way for a fifty per cent share in the reward money. She comes to visit him periodically, to check in on his progress and perhaps fall a little more for him too. Of all the subplots going on, the one given least attention is the romance between Lawrence and Stewart, which is so run of the mill that it could have been copied and pasted from any other script floating around Hollywood that year. Bremer returns for the finalé too, playing a strong part in how everything wraps up. At the end of the day, while Stewart is the one who put himself in danger, she’s the one who orchestrates the whole thing, rather an odd statement to make about a 1948 B-movie but a welcome one nonetheless. I don’t want to give it too much credit, because it could be the lack of budget manifesting itself. After all, she’s a journalist without a newspaper, as far as we can tell; we never see any evidence of it. Maybe she’s just the romantic lead and the reporter in one.

    That lack of budget is everywhere, but Boetticher and Roe do their best to hide it. I wouldn’t expect a sanitarium to be decorated in the latest styles, for instance, but La Siesta is bare bones through and through and gets barer when we sneak up the stairs to see the locked ward where Tor Johnson waits patiently for props that never arrive. Ostensibly, Dr. Porter has his patients work to give them something therapeutic to do, but really it helps cut down the need for extras. The state psychiatrist tells the fake couple of Kathy and Harold that private sanatoriums are busy affairs, but this one seems to have a patient population of half a dozen, plus a few extras dotted around the common room to make it seem like it’s worth their while to switch the lights on. I’d say half a dozen speaking roles, but both the Champ and the kid are apparently unable to speak, so we only hear four of them, which number does include the undercover investigator. Now, I’m wondering how they failed to twig to his subterfuge from his arrival!
    I enjoyed Behind Locked Doors, though Wald’s script deserved more depth, which would only have come from more running time and more budget, neither of which were going to happen at Eagle-Lion. Budd Boetticher went on to more prominent things, as in a way did Wald, who co-wrote Venus in Furswith Jess Franco. On the acting front, most of the cast were thinking about retirement, including Lucille Bremer. Only Richard Carlson really went on to notable roles after this, at least in the sci-fi world, where he was the lead in the overlooked The Magnetic Monsterand It Came from Outer Space, not to mention the far from overlooked Creature from the Black Lagoon. Most of his colleagues here were just getting old, but Bremer had other reasons to retire. During the shooting of Adventures of Casanovain Mexico, earlier in 1948, she met a man named Abelardo Luis Rodríguez, the son of a former president of the same name. By the time this picture reached theatres, they us bank schnucks hours married and she felt no need to fight for her MGM contract.

    They moved to Baja California, lucille bremer abelardo louis rodriguez they founded a 10,000 acre resort called Rancho Las Cruces, which started a tourism boom fed by the Hollywood stars that Lucille knew and the Mexican notables that Rod knew. Other actors, such as Desi Arnaz and Bing Crosby, who were both business partners of the Rodríguez family, would follow suit and build houses in Las Cruces. The marriage lasted fifteen busy years and accounted for four children but, after the divorce, Bremer moved to La Jolla, CA where she owned a clothing boutique for children. That far down the coast from Hollywood, where everyone is in the movie industry, whether they actually do anything or not, I wonder how many knew her in those later years as a former actress. While few actresses got to lead an MGM musical with Fred Astaire, hers turned out to be one of the forgotten ones and her screen career soon followed. This last role proved that she still had plenty of potential, but life intervened and we’ll never know what she could have done with it.
    Источник: https://www.apocalypselaterfilm.com/2017/02/behind-locked-doors-1948.html

    Lucille Bremer

    Lucille Rita Bremer (pronounced “Bray-mer”) was a film actress and dancer, particularly remembered for her work in MGM musical films. Born in Amsterdam, New York, to Richard Bremer and Sarah E. Nichols on February 21, 1917, and raised in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, Bremer’s father was of German descent and worked as a barber, while her mother was of Scottish descent and worked as a homemaker. Bremer was the youngest of two children. She had an older brother named Walter, who was 11 years older than her.

    When her family settled in Philadelphia, she developed a strong interest in dancing. She studied ballet as a child and later went on to dance with the Philadelphia Opera Company, sparking an appreciation for the performing arts.

    As the years went on, Bremer aimed to pursue dancing professionally. She returned to New York to dance at the 1939 World’s Fair and soon secured a career as a Rockette at Radio City Music Hall by age 16. She was typically 5th from the right in the lineup, and toured with the show.

    In addition to her work as a Rockette, Bremer actively sought additional dance roles, including appearances in Panama Hattie, earned a featured role in Dancing in the Streets, and the ingénue role in Lady in the Dark. At the same time, she attempted to begin a career in films. After an unsuccessful screen test for Warner Brothers, she once again turned to dance. However, her luck changed when MGM producer Arthur Freed discovered her dancing at the Copacabana and Club Versailles.

    Ultimately, Freed invited Bremer to Hollywood for a screen test with MGM. There, she tested with a passage from Dark Victory (1939). She was offered a contract to showcase her talent as a dancer, soon studying acting in efforts to become a star for the Freed Unit.

    After appearing in some uncredited film roles, Bremer’s big break would be as Rose Smith in Meet Me in St. Louis (1944). This appearance was followed by more work in musicals such as Ziegfeld Follies (1945), Yolanda and the Thief (1945), and Till the Clouds Roll By (1946). Though she starred in Yolanda and the Thief opposite Fred Astaire, the film was a box office failure and severely marred her rise to film stardom. Gradually, MGM ceased promoting her and she would make her final starring role in a film noir called Behind Locked Doors (1948).

    Disenchanted with Hollywood, Bremer left the industry and focused on her private life. She married Abelardo “Rod” Luis Rodriguez, son of a former president of Mexico, at Catalina Island in 1940, later moving to California Sur, Mexico. The couple started a private resort called Rancho Las Cruces, in addition to the Palmilla and Hacienda Hotels in Baja. Her connection to Hollywood piqued the interest of her former film colleagues, eager to vacation in Mexico. In addition, the couple also found business partners in Desi Arnaz and Lucille Ball, as well as Bing Crosby.

    The couple would go on to have four children: Nicolas, Cristina, Torre Richard, and Karen Rodriguez. They divorced in 1963.

    Following her divorce, Bremer moved to La Jolla, California, where she owned a clothing boutique for children. She balanced her time between La Jolla and Baja, traveling frequently, until her passing from a heart attack on April 16, 1996, at a La Jolla hospital. She was 79 years old.

    Today, very few tributes or locations of relevance in relation to Bremer remain. Her 1920 home at 1135 Miller St. in Utica, New York is long-gone.

    In 1940, she lived in an apartment at 307 79th St in New York, New York, which does remain today.

    Bremer’s ashes were partially scattered in the Sea of Cortez as well as next to the church that she and her husband had built on the resort property. A plaque honoring Bremer as well as Desi Arnaz is affixed to the church.

    While Bremer left behind a brief filmography, her work continues to entertain fans of classic Hollywood musicals.


    This post originally appeared in the Annette’s Classic Movie Travels column for Classic Movie Hub. View the original article here.

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    Источник: https://hometownstohollywood.com/new-york/lucille-bremer/

    The better half of Lucille Bremer and Abelardo Luis Rodriguez

    Picture of Lucille Bremer better half of Abelardo Luis Rodriguez.
    Picture of Abelardo Luis Rodriguez better half of Lucille Bremer

    The marriage of this actress and this persona started in 1948 and we have no record of its current status. They have hadn't children.

    The marriage between Lucille Bremer and Abelardo Luis Rodriguez lasts for 15 years.15
    Lucille Bremer and Abelardo Luis Rodriguez had have 0 children0

    Lucille Bremer born in 1917, about Abelardo Luis Rodriguez we lack data on his year of birth.

    Lucille Bremer zodiac sign is pisces104 years old

    Lucille was born in Amsterdam, New York USA but we do not know where Abelardo Luis Rodriguez was born Abelardo Luis Rodriguez.

    Lucille Bremer was born in Amsterdam, New York USA1917

    Lucille bremer abelardo louis rodriguez was 31 years old when she married, of Abelardo Luis Rodriguez we do not have that information.

    Lucille is pisces while for Abelardo Luis Rodriguez we do not know its zodiac sign.

    Lucille Bremer zodiac sign is pisces
    Источник: https://betterhalf.club

    Posted by: | on October 2, 2012
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